Journal articles

Publication: Crime, justice and social capital in the Torres Strait region

QUT Centre  for Justice member, and Head of School, QUT School of Justice Professor John Scott, Zoe Staines and James Morton have published an article in the Australian Institute of Criminology Trends and Issues in Crime and Criminal Justice titled, “Crime, justice and social capital in the Torres Strait region”.  
Abstract

While there has been much research into Indigenous crime and justice, previous research draws largely on Aboriginal peoples, who are culturally distinct from Torres Strait Islanders.

The Torres Strait region offers a unique opportunity to observe how justice is practised in remote contexts. Through statistical analysis and qualitative fieldwork, this study documents crime rates, community and customary justice practices and impediments to justice, to identify best practices unique to the Torres Strait region.

Crime-report data indicate relatively low rates of crime in the Torres Strait region. While under-reporting and under-policing can partly explain these differences, strong levels of social capital, as well as unique justice practices, also play important roles in preventing crime in the region.

A full copy of the article can be found here 

Scott J, Staines Z & Morton J 2021. Crime, justice and social capital in the Torres Strait region. Trends & issues in crime and criminal justice no. 620. Canberra: Australian Institute of Criminology. https://www.aic.gov.au/publications/tandi/tandi620

This article was based on a research project, culminating in a Report to the Criminology Research Advisory Council titled, “Understanding Crime and Justice in Torres Strait Islander Communities.” 

Abstract:

This project represents the first unique study of crime and justice in the Torres Strait region. While there has been much research into Indigenous crime and justice, previous research draws largely on Aboriginal peoples, who are culturally distinct from Torres Strait Islanders. The Torres Strait region offers an opportunity to observe how justice is practised in diverse remote contexts. Through statistical analysis and qualitative fieldwork involving local service providers and community members, this study documents crime rates, community and customary justice practices, as well as impediments to justice, to identify best practices specific to the Torres Strait region.

A full copy of the report can be found here

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