2019 ACS Distinguished Book Award

The Asian Criminological Society (ACS) is accepting nominations for the 2019 ACS Distinguished Book Award until February 15, 2019. Please see details below. We look forward to receiving many nominations.
Setsuo Miyazawa
ACS President 2019-2021

1. The 2019 ACS Distinguished Book Award Committee

Peter Grabosky, Committee Chair
PO Box 9054
Deakin, ACT 2600
Australia
Email: Peter.Grabosky@anu.edu.au

Nicole Wai Ting Cheung
Department of Sociology
The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Shatin, N.T.
HONG KONG
Email: nwtcheung@cuhk.edu.hk

Hua-Fu Hsu
Department of Criminology
National Chung Cheng University
168 University Road
Min-Hsiung
Chia-Yi County
Taiwan
Email: crmhfh@ccu.edu.tw

Mai Sato
School of Regulation and Global Governance
HC Coombs Extension (Building #8)
College of Asia and the Pacific
Australian National University
Canberra, ACT 2601
Email: mai.sato@anu.edu.au

Ramasubbu Thilagaraj
1981, 3rd Street
Vasantha Colony
Anna Nagar West
Chennai 600 040
Tamil Nadu
India
Email: rthilagaraj@gmail.com

Jing Zhang
2403# – 213
East Side of WangJing HuaYuan
Chaoyang District
Beijing
China 100102
Email: rwrlzj@163.com

2. Eligibility
( 1) Books on crime and criminal justice in Asia published in English in the calendar year of 2018 are eligible.
( 2) In addition to single-authored books, co-authored books are eligible, but collected works are not.

3. Nominations
(1) Nominations, including self-nominations, must be submitted to Peter Grabosky, the committee chair.
(2) Nominations will be accepted until 15 February 2019.
(3) Nominators are required to ask the publisher or the author of the nominated book to send a review copy to every committee member before 15 February 2019.

4. Announcement of the Award and Award Ceremony
(1) Up to two Awards and up to two Honorary Mentions will be announced by the end of April 2019.
(2) An award ceremony will be held during the 2019 annual meeting of the ACS on June 23-26, 2019, in Cebu, the Philippines. We regret that we are unable to provide any travel grant.

New Editorial Board International Journal for Crime Justice and Social Democracy

Welcome to the New Editorial Board International Journal for Crime Justice and Social Democracy

This is the 7th year of publication of the International Journal for Crime Justice and Social Democracy, which is committed to democratising knowledge through free to publish and free to download Open Access. We welcome our readers, reviewers, and International Editorial Board Members to another year of open access high quality publication. The demand to publish in our journal has grown exponentially over the last few years. We now receive a submission almost every day and so are very greatful to our reviewers. Our downloads are now over 100,000 per annum.

This year we welcome Associate Professor Matthew Ball as our new Assistant Editor and Dr Michael Chataway as our new Book Review Editor.

We thank Dr Kelly Richards for her contribution as Assistant Editor and Dr Bridget Harris for her contribution as Book Review Editor.

We look forward to working with you again this year.

Kerry Carrington and John Scott

Co Chief Editors

 

Research: Young people with cognitive disabilities and their experiences with police

Young people with cognitive disabilities are overrepresented in the criminal justice system. While about 4% of young men and 3% of young women have a cognitive disability in Australia, a much higher proportion of young people in detention (about 14%) has some form of cognitive impairment.

To contribute towards understanding this problem, Dr Kelly Richards (School of Justice, Queensland University of Technology) and Dr Kathy Ellem (School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University of Queensland) recently undertook interdisciplinary research on young people with cognitive disabilities’ first point of contact with the criminal justice system: the police. Funded by the Queensland Centre for Social Science Innovation, the research drew on the disciplines of criminology, social work and disability studies, and involved interviews with service providers who work with young people with cognitive disabilities in south-east Queensland. The project also sought the views of young people themselves, and for the first time, gave voice to three young people with cognitive disabilities who had been in contact with the police.
The research yielded a number of key insights that make a significant contribution to this under-examined topic:

• Service providers identified the phenomenon of “escalation” – ie, that once in an interaction with police, young people with cognitive disabilities face a range of difficulties exiting or evading police contact in ways that other young people usually successfully manage. Young people with cognitive disability may become highly visible to police and are at heightened risk of cycling in and out of the criminal justice system as offenders.
• Service providers also identified that young people with cognitive disabilities often come into increased contact with police due to the complex constellations of disadvantage that this group commonly experiences, such as homelessness, being in out-of-home care, co-morbid mental health conditions, and poverty. Further, a young person with cognitive disability may present with complex behavioural issues that others close to them find difficult to manage. Parents of young people and youth residential workers have been reported to deliberately involve the police as a strategy to cope with a young person’s challenging behaviours, again leading to increased police contact.
Young people with cognitive disabilities themselves reported in their interviews that being treated by police in ways that are “procedurally just” (ie being able to have a say, being treated with dignity, respect and fairness) enhanced their interactions with police. For example, 18-year-old “Justin” appeared to have a positive experience of citizen participation in his interaction with police. He reported having being supported by his disability worker to make a statement to police about a physical assault he had experienced. He reported that the police were “nice”, gave him time to explain things and directed some questions to his disability support worker, which he found helpful.
Findings from the study underscore the urgent need for better non-criminal justice supports for families of young people with cognitive disabilities, skill development in staff of youth services to better respond to complex behaviours of young people, as well as improved police training on issues of both youth and disability. The authors have recently been invited to present their research to Queensland‘s Department of Child Safety, Youth and Women.

Publications from the research:
Richards, K., Ellem, K., Grevis-James, N. and Dwyer, A. (2017) Young people with cognitive impairments’ interactions with police in Queensland: A report to the Queensland Centre for Social Science Innovation. Brisbane: https://eprints.qut.edu.au/109470/

Ellem, K. and Richards, K. (2018) Police contact with young people with cognitive disabilities: Perceptions of procedural (in)justice. Youth Justice: An International Journal https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1473225418794357

Richards, K. and Ellem, K. (2018) Young people with cognitive impairments and overrepresentation in the criminal justice system: Service provider perspectives. Police Practice and Research: An International Journal https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15614263.2018.1473771

Co-hosted international conference Southern Criminology, Santa Fe, Argentina

Around 100 scholars from Spain, Argentina, Brazil, Peru, Chile, Columbia, UK, America, Singapore and Australia met at the international conference on Southern Criminology, co-hosted by the Faculty of Law, QUT and the Faculty of Law, Universidad Nacional del Litorel, Argentina 7-9 November 2018. The papers were simultaneously translated to bridge global divides, enhance inter-lingual dialogue and cross-cultural communication. The event was attended by 13 staff from the School of Justice, Faculty of Law, QUT.

School of Justice, Faculty of Law Staff visit Faculty of Law, University of Buenos Aires

Aside

On Monday 10 November staff from the School of Justice, Faculty of Law QUT, visited the Faculty of Law, University of Buenos Aires (UBA), Argentina (Faculdad de Derecho UBA). Professor Diego Zysman from UBA, who is also an adjunct Professor in the Faculty of Law QUT, met the group from QUT to undertake a private tour of the magnificent building, paintings, sculpture, history and architecture. The faculty has played an important role in the building of Argentina as a democratic nation.13 of the country’s Presidents did their law degree here, as have many of the Judges who tried the military juntas. The most famous Raúl Alfonsín was the first elected president after the fall of the military dictatorship 10 December 1983. This year the university will celebrate 35 years since the return of democracy in Argentina.

 

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New research on what we know about small time ‘social’ drug dealers

What do we know about drug dealers? And how should the law deal with them? These issues are discussed in ABC Radio National’s weekly Law Report.

In the interview, Professor John Scott, from the Centre for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy, discusses his recently published research in the International Journal of Drug Policy, exploring how eleven different countries deal with low end drug dealers or ‘social suppliers’.

This follows a previous study, two years ago, of interviews with two hundred small scale cannabis sellers around Australia.

Social supply of cannabis in Australia

For more, listen to the interview.

Mark Wynn: Sexual Assault – Myths and Misconceptions

Mark Wynn: Sexual Assault – Myths and Misconceptions
3 October 10-11 a.m.
in person at CQU Brisbane Campus 160 Ann Street, Brisbane QLD 4000
or live-streamed
Free but registration is required
Fulbright Specialist Mark Wynn is a leading police trainer who has lectured at universities and police academies throughout the world. He draws upon his extensive experience in law enforcement and his knowledge of family violence; stalking; domestic violence and sexual violence. He has also worked a consultant and an advisor to government departments, providing strategies to prevent domestic violence and support in the development of policy and training curriculum for law enforcement.

Research scholarship round closing soon!

Interested in undertaking higher degree research for a PhD or Masters with the School of Justice at QUT? It’s not too late to get an application in before the scholarship round ends on 30 September 2018.

We are currently looking to supervise students in our areas of expertise:

  • Southern Criminology
  • Activism and Social Change
  • Gender, Sexuality and Violence
  • Policing, Diversity and Society
  • Technologies and Digital Justice

Learn more about the Crime, Justice and Social Democracy Research Centre and our research strengths

See what School of Justice Academics have been publishing

Find out more about higher degree research and the current scholarship round

Domestic Violence Beyond the Obvious: Interpreting Power, Control and Manipulation

Domestic Violence Beyond the Obvious: Interpreting Power, Control and Manipulation

Fulbright Specialist Mark Wynn

8 October 2018
1 – 5 pm
Room-Three-Sixty, Level 10, Y Block, QUT Gardens Point Campus

Free registration required

Please join the QUT School of Justice for a special domestic violence event with Fulbright specialist Mark Wynn. This interactive training will enable participants to see domestic violence offender manipulation through the eyes of people who have experienced domestic violence, first responders, and advocates. This session will enhance participants’ understanding of the power, control, and manipulation tactics used by abusers, touching on probable cause, interpretation of injuries, justifiable self-defense and determining the dominant/primary aggressor.

The Fulbright Specialist Program supports Australian educational institutions through grants to bring U.S. Specialists in selected disciplines to Australia. The aim of the FSP grant is to assist Australian educational institutions to exchange expertise and build collaborative linkages with U.S. faculty and professionals on curriculum and faculty development, institutional planning and a variety of other activities.

Sponsored by:

Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz wins domestic violence prevention award

Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz won a 2018 Domestic Violence Prevention Leadership Award from the Domestic Violence Prevention Centre Gold Coast for Furthering the Work – adding new information and knowledge. Read more