10th ACS conference – Call for abstract

Dear ACS Members, Scholars & Practitioners,

You are cordially invited to participate in the 10th Asian Criminological Society Annual Conference. This conference will be held in the City of Georgetown, Penang, Malaysia from 24th to 28th June 2018.

The primary objective of this conference is to bring together scholars, academics and practitioners working in the field, or in related disciplines, to share and exchange their knowledge and experiences. Scholars and practitioners from Asia and all over the world are therefore invited to attend.

We encourage scholars, academicians, and, in particular, practitioners to not only attend but also to present papers. Presentations on a wide range of topics in the area are welcomed, and papers synthesizing theory and practice are especially encouraged.

If you are interested in participating in this conference, please visit our website (https://events.mcpfpg.org/acsc2018/).

Thank you.

Associate Professor Dr. P.Sundramoorthy

Organizing Chairman

10th ACS Annual Conference

email: moorthy@usm.my

The Secretariat of Asian Criminological Society

website: www.acs001.com

email: asiancriminologist@gmail.com

 

Does #ANZSOC endorse the Pacific Solution by accepting Sponsorship from www.border.gov.au?

President, Australian and New Zealand Society of Criminology

Dear Dr McGee

We are aware that ANZSOC has recently received social media criticism for accepting a ‘silver sponsorship’ from the Department of Immigration and Border Protection (DIBP) for the 2017 conference. We are writing to express concern but also seek clarification about the nature of this sponsorship.

There is an emerging sentiment that this sponsorship was inappropriate for the Society’s annual event. We recognise that the DIBP has a wider ministerial function beyond border protection, however  the remit between DIBP and Australian Borderforce (ABF) is inextricably interwoven. Given the national and international condemnation and controversies surrounding DIBP’s  actions and policies in recent times we are surprised that ANZSOC would take the arguably injudicious decision to accept this department’s sponsorship.

While we acknowledge that DIPB , as mentioned, is responsible for customs and citizenship portfolios, much of its resources are devoted to border protection and the work of ABF. Indeed, the DIPB is jointly headed by Secretary Pezzullo and ABF’s Commissioner Quaedvlieg.

As you’ll be aware, the ABF as an operational arm of the DIPB, has outsourced state functions to corporate entities. Such privatisation of Australian border security, as part of the Pacific Solution, has been mired in allegations of scandal, torture, tax evasion, corruption and human rights abuses resulting in widespread public protest and condemnation. For ANZSOC to grant ‘silver sponsorship’ to a much maligned state-corporate complex with its reportedly unjust, abusive and illegal response to vulnerable people seeking asylum, is an indictment on the Society and an insult to those members who have committed their careers  to championing the plight of victims and to critiquing state and corporate deviance.

We note ANZSOC’s tweeted response to the Australian Critical Race and Whiteness Studies Association’, notably that ‘Criminology has always involved debate re contentious issues. The conference is an important forum to bring different players together 2 have these challenges conversation’. We agree, however, it is one thing to provide a forum for robust debate and offer a platform for all parties to exchange dialogue, it is quite another issue to receive sponsorship from one side of the debate only. Moreover, it is not clear how this year’s conference managed to successfully engage opposed voices in a forum that debated the challenging issues you allude to.

Without clarification of the sponsorship arrangements, and without ANZSOC attempting to disentangle the broader roles of DIPB from ABF, one is left with the impression that the conference was endorsing the Pacific Solution, Manus Island policies and the associated scandals mentioned above. Rightly or wrongly, this is the emerging picture, and the growing criticism on social media attests to that fact.

Would you kindly clarify the nature of the sponsorship. Why did ANZSOC choose to seek sponsorship from a Commonwealth department condemned by the international human rights community and mired in allegations of torture and abuse? We suggest that it is imperative that you as President publicly clarify ANZSOC’s position, and dispel the emerging suspicion that the Society, by virtue of accepting sponsorship, is supporting the punitive and widely-condemned offshore detention policies of the Australian Government.

Professors Reece Walters and John Scott
Directors. Crime and Justice Research Centre
Faculty of Law
Queensland University of Technology
2 George Street, Brisbane
Queensland, 4001.

Dr Cassandra Cross wins two awards at #ANZSOC 2017

Dr Cassandra Cross, Senior Lecturer, School of Justice, Faculty of Law, QUT was won two awards at the 2017 ANZSOC Conference.

The first is for the best publication by a new scholar in 2016 – ‘They’re Very Lonely’: Understanding the Fraud Victimisation of Seniors’ International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy, Vol 6 (4).

The second is the Adam Sutton Crime Prevention Award for the best publication or report on Crime Prevention.

Congratulations Cassandra from your colleagues at CJRC.

VC Excellence Awards for Law and Justice Staff

Today the VC Awards for Excellence were presented by the Dean, Professor John Humphrey for staff in the Faculty Award. The winners, photographed above, included an award for Alison McIntosh, in recognition of her outstanding management as Journal Editor of the International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy.

Dr Matthew Ball, Senior Lecturer in the School of Justice, was presented with two awards, one for Excellence in Research and the other for Excellence in Teaching.

Professor John Scott, Dr Bridget Harris and Robyn Johnston were presented with a VC Excellence Award for their organistion of the International Conference, on Crime and Justice in Asia and the Global South, which was a tremendous success.

 

 

Vol 6 (4) International Journal for Crime, Justice & Social Democracy just published

Vol 6(4), the special edition of International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy on ‘Corruption Downunder’ edited by Scott Poynting and David Whyte, has been published online (as of today, 1 December 2017). The article are free to download and to share.  Please send/tweet/share to your lists.

You will see on the journal’s home page, ahead of the Table of Contents for the issue, that this journal was recently ranked in Q2 by Scopus and has been scored as the top Law journal in Australia. We hope this distinction for the journal will contribute towards interest in your articles and the issue as a whole.

#CJRC staff and adjuncts win awards at the American Society of Criminology

Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz, from the CJRC, and her two co-authors Professors Walter Dekeseredy and Marty Schwartz were awarded the best book prize by the Victimology Division of the American Society of Criminology , 2017.

In another prize ceremony Professor Rob White from University of Tasmania, and adjunct professor with the CJRC, QUT won the Lifetime Achievement Award, Division of Critical Criminology, ASC, 2017. Rob was also recognised for his global contribution to criminology, by the International Division of the ASC.

Professor Marty Schwartz with Professor Rob White

INTRODUCING NEW BOOK SERIES: Routledge Studies in Crime and Justice in Asia and the Global South Call for Proposals

Crime and justice studies, as with much social science, has concentrated mainly on problems in the metropolitan centres of the Global North, while Asia and the Global South have remained largely invisible in criminological thinking. Routledge is now accepting proposals for a brand new research series which aims to redress this imbalance by showcasing exciting new ways of thinking and doing crime and justice research from the global periphery. Edited by John Scott and Russell Hogg or Queensland University of Technology and by Wing Hong Chui of City University of Hong Kong, the series provides an opportunity to illustrate the work of emerging and established scholars who are challenging traditional paradigms in the fields of crime and justice. Bringing together scholarly work from a range of disciplines, from criminology, law, and sociology to psychology, cultural geography and comparative social sciences, the series will offer grounded empirical research and fresh theoretical approaches and cover a range of pressing topics, including international corruption, drug use, environmental issues, sex work, organized crime, innovative models of justice, and punishment and penology.

Please contact John Scott (j31.scott@qut.edu.au), Russell Hogg (russell.hogg@qut.edu.au), Wing Hong Chui (eric.chui@cityu.edu.hk) for more details, or alternatively Tom Sutton (Thomas.Sutton@tandf.co.uk) , Senior Editor for Criminology at Routledge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ASSA grant success: ‘Technology and Domestic Violence: Experiences, Perpetration and Responses’ Workshop 2018

CJRC staff – Dr Bridget Harris and Professor Kerry Carrington, with Dr Delanie Woodlock and the Honourable Marcia Neave – have received funding from the Academy of Social Sciences Australia to host a workshop in August 2018, on ‘Technology and Domestic Violence: Experiences, Perpetration and Responses’ #DVTech18 #DVTech18QUT

Domestic violence is widely recognised as one of Australia’s most important social issues, with approximately one woman killed by her partner, weekly. This event will bring focus to an emerging trend in domestic violence: the use of technology to stalk and abuse victim/survivors. Landmark studies have been conducted in Australia that have highlighted the significant impacts on wellbeing and risks to safety associated with this violence, but as yet there is no consensus in regards to the definitions, effects, legal and judicial remedies and social responses. By bringing together 20 leading scholars, practitioners and technology experts from across the nation, this workshop will produce knowledge that will improve policy and practice in protecting and empowering victims, with the ultimate aim of preventing this under-recognised violence from occurring.

The workshop will also be supported by the Crime and Justice Research Centre and will be held in August 2018; for more on the event, outcomes and research conducted by QUT scholars in this field, contact Bridget.Harris@qut.edu.au

Discovery and DECRA success for the Crime and Justice Research Centre

We are delighted to announce the following successful ARC DECRA and DISCOVERY  successes.

Dr Angela Higginson has been awarded a Discovery Early Career Researcher Award (DECRA) entitled,  Ethnically Motivated Youth Hate Crime in Australia

Total Funding Amount: $344,996 over three years
 
Proposal Summary:
This project aims to provide the first assessment of youth hate crime in Australia, examine incidence rates over time, and explore how Australia’s experiences compare internationally. Hate crime can cause injury, psychological harm and social disengagement. For victims in early adolescence – a critical time of identity formation – the harms may be multiplied. The project will uncover the risk and protective factors for perpetration and victimisation, and for understanding the consequences for hate crime victims. This is expected to benefit the community by helping to inform social policy to improve the lives of Australia’s youth.

Out of 197 successful DECRA, only 2 were awarded in the 1602 Criminology FOR code

Professor Kerry Carrington is the successful recipient of a Discovery grant entitled, Preventing gendered violence: lessons from the global south

Total Funding Amount: $228,951 over three years

Projects Summary:
Preventing gendered violence: lessons from the global south. This project aims to study the establishment of police stations for women in Argentina as a key element to preventing gendered violence. This project aims to discover the extent to which the Argentinian interventions prevent the occurrence of gendered violence, and identify aspects that could inform the development of new approaches to preventing gendered violence in Australia. Anticipated outcomes include knowledge critical to developing and implementing new ways to prevent gendered violence, with long-term benefits for national health, wellbeing and productivity.

Out of 594 successful Discovery Projects, only four were awarded in the 1602 Criminology FOR code

Call for papers – Southern Criminology Workshop, Argentina  7-9 Nov 2018

CRIME, LAW AND JUSTICE IN THE GLOBAL SOUTH
Southern Criminology Workshop 7-9 N0VEMBER 2018
SANTA FE, ARGENTINA
Co-Hosted by the Faculty of Social and Juridical Sciences, National University of Litoral, Santa Fe, Argentina and the Faculty of Law, Queensland University of Technology, Australia

Academic knowledge about crime, law and justice has generally been sourced from a select number of countries from the Global North, whose journals, conferences, publishers and universities dominate the intellectual landscape –particularly, the English speaking world. As a consequence research about these matters in contexts of the Global South have tended to reproduce concepts and arguments developed there to understand local problems and processes. In recent times, there have been substantial efforts to undo this colonized way of thinking.
This three day workshop set in the ideal location of Santa Fe, Argentina brings together scholars from across the globe to contribute to this task of de-colonising knowledge about crime, law and justice. The workshop aims to link northern and southern scholars in a collective project to create globally connected critical and innovative knowledges.

The workshop will be convened in three languages; Portuguese, Spanish and English. Selected papers will be published as a Special Edition of the International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy, an open access journal.

Abstracts of 250 words are invited in Spanish, Portuguese or English.
Abstracts Due: 31 May 2018
Early submission of abstracts is advised as the workshop will be limited to 100.
Email to: delitoysociedad@unl.edu.ar