Conference: query:data – 16 July 2018

Register for the national query:data conference!

Date: 16 July 2018

Location: ZINC, Federation Square, Melbourne.

Register here: https://querydata2018.eventbrite.com.au.

Consumer Policy Research Centre (CPRC) is hosting query:data, a national conference on consumer data, innovation and fairness in the digital economy.

CPRC’s research shows that Australian consumers want more choice, control and transparency over how their data is being collected and used. Reforms internationally, such as the introduction of the General Data Protection Regulation in the EU, reflect major attempts to shift the power and control over data to consumers. How we ensure this occurs in Australia, while facilitating innovation and competition, is a critical question for those working in business, the community sector, regulators, policymakers and academia.

Join Australia’s leading researchers, regulators, advocates and businesses to discuss the evolving consumer policy & practice landscape across the fields of privacy, competition and consumer law, data ethics, machine learning and open data.

Key speakers include:

  • Mr Rod Sims, Chair, Australian Competition & Consumer Commission
  • Mr Ed Santow, Australian Human Rights Commissioner
  • Dr Monique Mann, Vice Chancellor’s Research Fellow in Technology & Regulation, Queensland University of Technology
  • Dr Katharine Kemp, Lecturer, University of New South Wales
  • Ms Andrea Lau, Founder, Small Multiples
  • Mr Nigel Dobson, Banking Services Domain Lead, ANZ

See the full program on the CPRC website in the next week: http://cprc.org.au/2018/05/25/querydata-national-conference-consumer-data/

Use the code QD18 to receive 25% off registrations for a limited time.

 

Call for Abstracts: Crime, Justice and Social Democracy 5th Biennial International Conference 2019

The 5th biennial international conference hosted by the Crime, Justice and Social Democracy Research Centre, Queensland University of Technology is being held 15-17 July 2019.

This conference seeks to further build on and innovate in new and imaginative areas of criminological thought.   This conference creates a globally connected space to enhance the dialogue between scholars and practitioners from the Global South and the Global North. The conference especially welcomes scholars from the global north – as a critical aim of the conference is to link northern and southern scholars in a collective project that will radically transnationalise the discipline into the future.

The conference is being convened at Broadbeach, a picturesque part of the Gold Coast in the south east corridor of Queensland, Australia. It has an international airport and is within close proximity to Asia and other parts of the Global South, as well as the beautiful beaches of the Gold Coast and its adjacent hinterland with rich and rare biodiversity.

Further information about the conference, including information on how to submit abstracts, can be found on the conference website

Conference: Queer(y)ing Justice in the Global South Conference

Date: 11-13 July 2018

Location: Charles Perkins Centre, Building D17, John Hopkins Drive (off Missenden Rd), University of Sydney

Recent years have seen social, criminal, and legal justice campaigns for sexuality and gender diverse people gain increasing visibility and popular support in many jurisdictions, while repression and discrimination have increased in others. At the same time, academic LGBT and queer scholarship in fields such as criminology, criminal justice studies, sociology, and socio-legal studies, has grown significantly.

Despite reversals of enfranchisement for sexuality and gender diverse people in some countries, important changes in the interests of social and legal justice have been achieved, and there is a growing space in some legal and criminal justice contexts for the needs of sexuality and gender diverse people to be recognised. However, more can be done to respond to the intersections of inequalities in these contexts. Culturally diverse people, Indigenous people, and people seeking safety, among others, have not always benefited from these gains. A gulf remains between academia and practitioners in these areas, with greater opportunity to pay attention to the voices of those in the Global South in these debates, and to how ‘Northern’ frameworks guiding research and practice in this area may need to be reconsidered. These issues are central to ongoing campaigns to achieve greater social and criminal justice for sexuality and gender diverse people globally.

To further explore and respond to these issues, and strengthen the international networks of scholars and practitioners working in this area, we invite proposals to speak at an upcoming conference on ‘Queer(y)ing Justice in the Global South’. We hope to question how justice can be ‘queered’ and queried from the perspectives of sexuality and gender diverse people.

The conference is an opportunity to bring together researchers, community members, and organisations working at the intersections of sexuality, gender diversity, and justice, broadly conceived.

Further information about the conference can be found here:  http://sydney.edu.au/news/law/457.html?eventid=11768

 

Event: Defending Truth Internet Freedom Hack

Crime and Justice Research Centre member Dr Monique Mann is speaking at the ‘Defending Truth Internet Freedom Hack’ to be held this weekend (20-22nd of April) across both Brisbane and Melbourne.

The Internet Freedom Hack is a community event that brings technologists with a passion for digital rights together for a weekend to build things that advance the cause of internet freedom.

Dr Mann will be in conversation with Lauri Love about all the terrible things that governments around the world are doing for internet freedom and privacy, with a focus on the ridiculous #waronmaths in Australia and across the Five Eyes alliance more broadly. They will talk through the options of what we can realistically do about it as scholactivists and hacktivists, and drawing from Love’s recent success fighting extradition and 99 years in a US prison, how to fight back against internet apathy, privacy nihilism and the government.

Lauri Love’s extradition case was one of the cases examined in Dr Mann’s recent co-authored article with Dr Ian Warren and Ms Sally Kennedy on ‘The legal geographies of transnational cyber-prosecutions: Extradition, human rights and forum shifting’ published in the leading international (Q1) journal Global Crime.

See attached QUT media release about the event here

You can register to attend the Internet Freedom Hack and the talks here: https://internetfreedomhack.org/

 

 

Event: Cybercrime and Counter Terrorism Panel

The QUT Justice Society and Women in Technology proudly presents: A Professional Panel on Cyber Crime and Counter Terrorism

These societies, who are both passionate about the intersection of technology and the justice system, have come together to provide students a unique opportunity – to discover how cyber crime and counter terrorism works within and influences our justice system. This evening is a great opportunity to listen to amazing professionals and their career journeys in the field. It’s also a fantastic way to network with the professionals and other students and possibly open up more opportunities for yourself!

So if you’re trying to figure out what field of justice works well for you or if you know that cyber crime and/or counter terrorism is what you want to work in and want some more information or if you’re just really interested in the area, then come along for a lovely and very informative evening with us!

Date: Tuesday, 1 May 2018
Time: 5:45pm for a 6pm start
Location: Z1064 Gibson Room, Z Block, QUT Gardens Point Campus
Who: Students of all degrees are more than welcome

Catering will be provided. Please purchase your FREE tickets to assist with catering and dietary requirements.

To purchase FREE tickets click here

CJRC Seminar Series: Eddie, Smoke and Mirrors – Adjunct Professor Scott Poynting

Crime and Justice Research Centre Seminar Series with speaker Adjunct Professor Scott Poynting

Topic: Eddie, Smoke and Mirrors

Date: Thursday 12 April 2018
When: 4.00pm – 5.30pm
Venue: C Block, level 4, room C412,
QUT Gardens Point Campus,
2 George Street, Brisbane

Register: by Friday 6 April 2018
by emailing law.research@qut.edu.au.

Abstract:
This paper draws inspiration from Frank Pearce’s insistence, over forty years ago in his Crimes of the Powerful, that ‘It is not possible to explain … systematic continuous [corrupt] behaviour in terms of the “greed” of a few individuals’ and that anti-corruption prosecutions ‘by condemning an infraction as illegal and abnormal serve ‘to dramatise an imaginary social order’. It presents a case study of corruption investigations and proceedings involving ‘disgraced’ former New South Wales upper house ‘numbers man’ of the Labor party, Eddie Obeid, currently serving a prison sentence for wilful misconduct in public office.
While justice will be seen to be done in this case and the process is clearly justifiable, the crimes of Obeid and his cohort are small change compared to large-scale corporate corruption. The Obeid family is not General Electric or Westinghouse. Why, then, the public theatre? What function does it serve? This paper argues that such charades act out the fantasy that the normal workings of capitalism are uncorrupted, and that abnormal aberrations can be rooted out, to the public benefit. The earlier cartels and anti-competitive price-fixing of monopoly capitalism shown by Pearce to be endemic, are now supplemented by newer corporate criminal opportunities under neo-liberalism. In the focus on the lining of private pockets, our view is averted from the larger damage to public wellbeing of privatisation, contracting out of public resources, and depredation of the environment for short-term private profit.

@CrimeJusticeQUT

Adjunct Professor Scott Poynting
Scott Poynting is an adjunct professor in the School of Justice at QUT. He was founding professor in criminology at the University of Auckland (2013-16) and was previously Professor in Sociology at Manchester Metropolitan University. He is author of 99 journal articles and scholarly chapters, and co-author or co-editor of a dozen books, the most recent of which is Media, Crime and Racism, just published by Palgrave. He co-edited, with David Whyte, the December 2017 special issue of the International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy, on ‘Corruption Downunder’.

Workshop: Coercive Control

  1.  Kate Fitz-Gibbon
  2. Sandra Walklate
  3. Rachel Neil
  4. Refreshments following Coercive Control
  5. Book Launch – CJRC staff

Last week the Crime and Justice Research Centre and School of Justice hosted a workshop on ‘Coercive Control‘.  The purpose of this workshop was to examine the efficacy of the implementation of recent legislation alongside subjecting this concept to further critical interrogation with a view to examining its potential for other jurisdictions.

The workshop panel discussed the concept of Coercive Control from different points of view and applications, giving the audience a well-rounded perspective on the topic.

Speakers included Kate Fitz-Gibbon, a Senior Lecturer in Criminology at Monash University, and a member of the Monash Gender and Family Violence Research Program. Her research examines family violence, the law of homicide, youth justice and the impact of criminal law reform across Australian and international jurisdictions.

Rachel Neil is the Principal Solicitor of the Women’s Legal Service (WLS). Rachel is passionate about providing vulnerable women with high quality legal support and working towards a future where all women are free from violence.

Sandra Walklate is Eleanor Rathbone Chair of Sociology at the University of Liverpool (U.K.), co-joint Chair of Criminology at Monash University and an Adjunct Professor at the QUT School of Justice. She is currently Editor in Chief of the British Journal of Criminology and in July 2018 becomes president elect of the British Criminology Society. She is internationally recognised for her work on criminal victimisation (including terrorism) and gender and violence.

The event proved very popular with approximately 100 registered.

Following the event there was a celebration of books recently published by Crime and Justice Research Centre members since 2016.

 

 

 

Research Showcase – Queensland Police Service

On the 8th March the Crime and Justice Research Centre was invite to deliver a Research Showcase at Queensland Police Service. The event, hosted by Frontline Research and information, Organisational Capability Command at QPS and facilitated by our QUT Police Fellow, Inspector Chris Emzin.

Four CJRC members: Professor Kerry Carrington, Dr Cassandra Cross, Dr Claire Ferguson and Associate Professor Mark Lauchs presented their work to the QPS cohort, to highlight and share work conducted at QUT.

Professor Carrington discussed the policing of gendered violence in the Global South, focusing on the innovative approach of women’s only police stations in Latin America and possible applications in the Australian context. Her ARC Discovery project with Professor Maximo Sozzo will explore the prevention of gendered violence; lessons from the Global South.

Dr Cross reflected on her work with online fraud which she began while working for the Queensland Police Service, and her Churchill Fellowship which extends this work and the challenges police and victims face when responding to fraud. She also outlined her current projects and future research directions in the field of cybercrime, digital crime, fraud and romance fraud.

Dr Ferguson spoke on her fascinating research and consultancy in the field of forensic criminology, offender evidence manipulation at homicide scenes, how police can combat these efforts and processes of determining death in complex cases. She outlined her research in Australian jurisdictions and beyond, on strategies offenders use and features police can use to combat these efforts.

Associate Professor Mark Lauchs’s presentation covered his work on organised crime and outlaw motorcycle groups. He summarised strategies researching these fields in Australia, with limited data in the public domain; how to redress knowledge gaps and explore the ‘organised’ component of crime as well as impacts on the community.

Thank you to the team and to Chris for facilitating what was, we hope, the first of a series of research events with Queensland Police. We look forward to exploring future research collaborations and initiatives with QPS.

 

Professor John Scott keynote at Indian National Justice Conference

Professor Scott is presented with gifts by Professor Sibnath Deb, Dean of Law, Pondicherry University.

Professor John Scott has recently returned from Puducherry (a part of French India until 1954), India where he presented a keynote conference paper on the theme of ‘Southern criminology and cognitive justice’.  The two day conference, organized by the School of Law, Pondicherry University (A Central University), examined The Role of Law Enforcement Authorities and Government in Upholding Justice. Distinguished presenters at the national conference included Justice N. Santosh Hegde (Former Judge, Supreme Court of India), Justice Indira Banerjee (Chief Justice of Madras High Court, Chennai), Justice Ravi R. Tripathi (Law Commission, Government of India) and Mr. V. Narayanswamy (Chief Minister, Puducherry Union Territory).  Scott made the case for a globally inclusive criminology noting that Australian, US and British textbooks ignored crime in the Subcontinent. This was especially striking in the case of Australia and Britain given the shared legal, social and political history. He argued that the extent of neglect exposed a bias in the way in which criminological knowledge was produced and disseminated and discussed the historic development of criminology in India and its growth over the last few decades. Major themes of the conference included access to justice, human rights, the role of police and political corruption. Approximately 200 people attended the conference.

 

Associate Professor Michael Flood contributes to ANROWS public forum and training

Michael Flood at ANROWS Community of Practice Workshop

Michael Flood at Evidence to Action & Action as Evidence Forum

Associate Professor Michael Flood contributed to two Sydney events on violence prevention hosted by Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety (ANROWS).

The first event was a forum on violence prevention, Evidence to Action & Action as Evidence, intended to showcase the successes and challenges encountered by local communities working to end violence against women. The event highlighted projects and findings from the Building Safe Communities for Women (BSCW) Grant Projects and the ANROWS Action Research Support Project. A report of findings from associated action research was launched at the forum where 130 participants from communities across Australia gathered for the full day event. Download the report here. Dr Flood spoke on his impact evaluation of the ‘Working Together With Men’ project in Melbourne, and hosted a panel with five speakers on engaging men in preventing violence against women.

Associate Professor Flood also presented a workshop as part of an ANROWS Community of Practice Workshop on February 22. These workshops are for ANROWS staff and ANROWS-supported projects to develop their understandings of and skills in violence prevention. Dr Flood’s three-hour, interactive workshop focused on effective ways to engage men in the prevention of men’s violence against women.