Domestic Violence Beyond the Obvious: Interpreting Power, Control and Manipulation

Domestic Violence Beyond the Obvious: Interpreting Power, Control and Manipulation

Fulbright Specialist Mark Wynn

8 October 2018
1 – 5 pm
Room-Three-Sixty, Level 10, Y Block, QUT Gardens Point Campus

Free registration required

Please join the QUT School of Justice for a special domestic violence event with Fulbright specialist Mark Wynn. This interactive training will enable participants to see domestic violence offender manipulation through the eyes of people who have experienced domestic violence, first responders, and advocates. This session will enhance participants’ understanding of the power, control, and manipulation tactics used by abusers, touching on probable cause, interpretation of injuries, justifiable self-defense and determining the dominant/primary aggressor.

The Fulbright Specialist Program supports Australian educational institutions through grants to bring U.S. Specialists in selected disciplines to Australia. The aim of the FSP grant is to assist Australian educational institutions to exchange expertise and build collaborative linkages with U.S. faculty and professionals on curriculum and faculty development, institutional planning and a variety of other activities.

Sponsored by:

Professor Reece Walters – ESC Conference, Sarajevo

Professor Reece Walters (Director, Crime, Justice and Social Democracy Research Centre) is pictured above with Professor Gorazd Mesko (President of the European Society of Criminology) at this week’s ESC conference in Sarajevo. Reece has been an International Partner Investigator with Professor Mesko on a Euro$770,000 project examining Water Crimes in Europe funded by the European Commission. This research will be published in a forthcoming book entitled Water, Governance and Crime. Reece has also presented a paper at the ESC as part of special panel on Southern Criminology chaired by QUT Adjunct Professor Maximo Sozzo. Reece’s paper was based on a chapter co-authored with QUT Adjunct Professors Nigel South and Avi Brisman and published in the Palgrave Handbook of Criminology and Global South edited by Kerry Carrington et al. Reece’s presentation focussed on the following:

The politics and conquests of the Global North have long necessitated the forced migration, colonization and ecological plunder of the Global South for imperial and capital expansionism. In recent decades, these excesses of accelerated industrialization have created new victims, with entire populations or “climate refugees” (Barnes and Dove 2015) or “environmental refugees” (Seelye 2001) dislocated by human-induced climate change. This presentation adopts Connell’s (2007) southern theory and Carrington and colleagues’ (2015) idea of a “southern criminology” to examine critically the notion of ‘climate apartheid’ and explore its impacts on the increasing number of individuals displaced by environmental harms.

CJSDRC presents at 25th World Congress of the International Political Science Association (IPSA)

Michael Wilson, Dr Erin O’Brien, Michelle Ringrose and Dr Helen Berents at the IPSA 25th World Congress

This week four members of the CJSDRC (Crime Justice and Social Democracy Research Centre) presented at the 25th World Congress of the International Political Science Association (IPSA); joining over 2000 delegates in Brisbane from the 21-25 July. 

 The IPSA World Congress brings together delegates from over the world to discuss diverse and pressing issues facing political institutions and political practices at local, national and international levels. This year’s theme was ‘Borders and Margins’.

 Across four busy days Dr Erin O’Brien, Dr Helen Berents, Michelle Ringrose, and Michael Wilson presented on several exciting research projects they are currently undertaking. Dr Erin O’Brien and PhD Candidate Michael Wilson presented a paper together on “Alternative tweeting: reclaiming institutions from the Trump Presidency” in a session on political participation on the internet. Michelle Ringrose, also a PhD Candidate with the Centre, presented on her ongoing PhD research with a paper titled “Gendered Narratives in Genocidal Crimes: An Analysis of Civil Society Representations of the Yazidi Genocide”.  Dr Helen Berents’ paper, in a session on violence, images and world politics was titled “Violence, Compassion and Spectacle: The Politics of Sharing Images of Suffering Children”

 

Conference: query:data – 16 July 2018

Register for the national query:data conference!

Date: 16 July 2018

Location: ZINC, Federation Square, Melbourne.

Register here: https://querydata2018.eventbrite.com.au.

Consumer Policy Research Centre (CPRC) is hosting query:data, a national conference on consumer data, innovation and fairness in the digital economy.

CPRC’s research shows that Australian consumers want more choice, control and transparency over how their data is being collected and used. Reforms internationally, such as the introduction of the General Data Protection Regulation in the EU, reflect major attempts to shift the power and control over data to consumers. How we ensure this occurs in Australia, while facilitating innovation and competition, is a critical question for those working in business, the community sector, regulators, policymakers and academia.

Join Australia’s leading researchers, regulators, advocates and businesses to discuss the evolving consumer policy & practice landscape across the fields of privacy, competition and consumer law, data ethics, machine learning and open data.

Key speakers include:

  • Mr Rod Sims, Chair, Australian Competition & Consumer Commission
  • Mr Ed Santow, Australian Human Rights Commissioner
  • Dr Monique Mann, Vice Chancellor’s Research Fellow in Technology & Regulation, Queensland University of Technology
  • Dr Katharine Kemp, Lecturer, University of New South Wales
  • Ms Andrea Lau, Founder, Small Multiples
  • Mr Nigel Dobson, Banking Services Domain Lead, ANZ

See the full program on the CPRC website in the next week: http://cprc.org.au/2018/05/25/querydata-national-conference-consumer-data/

Use the code QD18 to receive 25% off registrations for a limited time.

 

Call for Abstracts: Crime, Justice and Social Democracy 5th Biennial International Conference 2019

The 5th biennial international conference hosted by the Crime, Justice and Social Democracy Research Centre, Queensland University of Technology is being held 15-17 July 2019.

This conference seeks to further build on and innovate in new and imaginative areas of criminological thought.   This conference creates a globally connected space to enhance the dialogue between scholars and practitioners from the Global South and the Global North. The conference especially welcomes scholars from the global north – as a critical aim of the conference is to link northern and southern scholars in a collective project that will radically transnationalise the discipline into the future.

The conference is being convened at Broadbeach, a picturesque part of the Gold Coast in the south east corridor of Queensland, Australia. It has an international airport and is within close proximity to Asia and other parts of the Global South, as well as the beautiful beaches of the Gold Coast and its adjacent hinterland with rich and rare biodiversity.

Further information about the conference, including information on how to submit abstracts, can be found on the conference website

Conference: Queer(y)ing Justice in the Global South Conference

Date: 11-13 July 2018

Location: Charles Perkins Centre, Building D17, John Hopkins Drive (off Missenden Rd), University of Sydney

Recent years have seen social, criminal, and legal justice campaigns for sexuality and gender diverse people gain increasing visibility and popular support in many jurisdictions, while repression and discrimination have increased in others. At the same time, academic LGBT and queer scholarship in fields such as criminology, criminal justice studies, sociology, and socio-legal studies, has grown significantly.

Despite reversals of enfranchisement for sexuality and gender diverse people in some countries, important changes in the interests of social and legal justice have been achieved, and there is a growing space in some legal and criminal justice contexts for the needs of sexuality and gender diverse people to be recognised. However, more can be done to respond to the intersections of inequalities in these contexts. Culturally diverse people, Indigenous people, and people seeking safety, among others, have not always benefited from these gains. A gulf remains between academia and practitioners in these areas, with greater opportunity to pay attention to the voices of those in the Global South in these debates, and to how ‘Northern’ frameworks guiding research and practice in this area may need to be reconsidered. These issues are central to ongoing campaigns to achieve greater social and criminal justice for sexuality and gender diverse people globally.

To further explore and respond to these issues, and strengthen the international networks of scholars and practitioners working in this area, we invite proposals to speak at an upcoming conference on ‘Queer(y)ing Justice in the Global South’. We hope to question how justice can be ‘queered’ and queried from the perspectives of sexuality and gender diverse people.

The conference is an opportunity to bring together researchers, community members, and organisations working at the intersections of sexuality, gender diversity, and justice, broadly conceived.

Further information about the conference can be found here:  http://sydney.edu.au/news/law/457.html?eventid=11768

 

Event: Defending Truth Internet Freedom Hack

Crime and Justice Research Centre member Dr Monique Mann is speaking at the ‘Defending Truth Internet Freedom Hack’ to be held this weekend (20-22nd of April) across both Brisbane and Melbourne.

The Internet Freedom Hack is a community event that brings technologists with a passion for digital rights together for a weekend to build things that advance the cause of internet freedom.

Dr Mann will be in conversation with Lauri Love about all the terrible things that governments around the world are doing for internet freedom and privacy, with a focus on the ridiculous #waronmaths in Australia and across the Five Eyes alliance more broadly. They will talk through the options of what we can realistically do about it as scholactivists and hacktivists, and drawing from Love’s recent success fighting extradition and 99 years in a US prison, how to fight back against internet apathy, privacy nihilism and the government.

Lauri Love’s extradition case was one of the cases examined in Dr Mann’s recent co-authored article with Dr Ian Warren and Ms Sally Kennedy on ‘The legal geographies of transnational cyber-prosecutions: Extradition, human rights and forum shifting’ published in the leading international (Q1) journal Global Crime.

See attached QUT media release about the event here

You can register to attend the Internet Freedom Hack and the talks here: https://internetfreedomhack.org/

 

 

Event: Cybercrime and Counter Terrorism Panel

The QUT Justice Society and Women in Technology proudly presents: A Professional Panel on Cyber Crime and Counter Terrorism

These societies, who are both passionate about the intersection of technology and the justice system, have come together to provide students a unique opportunity – to discover how cyber crime and counter terrorism works within and influences our justice system. This evening is a great opportunity to listen to amazing professionals and their career journeys in the field. It’s also a fantastic way to network with the professionals and other students and possibly open up more opportunities for yourself!

So if you’re trying to figure out what field of justice works well for you or if you know that cyber crime and/or counter terrorism is what you want to work in and want some more information or if you’re just really interested in the area, then come along for a lovely and very informative evening with us!

Date: Tuesday, 1 May 2018
Time: 5:45pm for a 6pm start
Location: Z1064 Gibson Room, Z Block, QUT Gardens Point Campus
Who: Students of all degrees are more than welcome

Catering will be provided. Please purchase your FREE tickets to assist with catering and dietary requirements.

To purchase FREE tickets click here

CJRC Seminar Series: Eddie, Smoke and Mirrors – Adjunct Professor Scott Poynting

Crime and Justice Research Centre Seminar Series with speaker Adjunct Professor Scott Poynting

Topic: Eddie, Smoke and Mirrors

Date: Thursday 12 April 2018
When: 4.00pm – 5.30pm
Venue: C Block, level 4, room C412,
QUT Gardens Point Campus,
2 George Street, Brisbane

Register: by Friday 6 April 2018
by emailing law.research@qut.edu.au.

Abstract:
This paper draws inspiration from Frank Pearce’s insistence, over forty years ago in his Crimes of the Powerful, that ‘It is not possible to explain … systematic continuous [corrupt] behaviour in terms of the “greed” of a few individuals’ and that anti-corruption prosecutions ‘by condemning an infraction as illegal and abnormal serve ‘to dramatise an imaginary social order’. It presents a case study of corruption investigations and proceedings involving ‘disgraced’ former New South Wales upper house ‘numbers man’ of the Labor party, Eddie Obeid, currently serving a prison sentence for wilful misconduct in public office.
While justice will be seen to be done in this case and the process is clearly justifiable, the crimes of Obeid and his cohort are small change compared to large-scale corporate corruption. The Obeid family is not General Electric or Westinghouse. Why, then, the public theatre? What function does it serve? This paper argues that such charades act out the fantasy that the normal workings of capitalism are uncorrupted, and that abnormal aberrations can be rooted out, to the public benefit. The earlier cartels and anti-competitive price-fixing of monopoly capitalism shown by Pearce to be endemic, are now supplemented by newer corporate criminal opportunities under neo-liberalism. In the focus on the lining of private pockets, our view is averted from the larger damage to public wellbeing of privatisation, contracting out of public resources, and depredation of the environment for short-term private profit.

@CrimeJusticeQUT

Adjunct Professor Scott Poynting
Scott Poynting is an adjunct professor in the School of Justice at QUT. He was founding professor in criminology at the University of Auckland (2013-16) and was previously Professor in Sociology at Manchester Metropolitan University. He is author of 99 journal articles and scholarly chapters, and co-author or co-editor of a dozen books, the most recent of which is Media, Crime and Racism, just published by Palgrave. He co-edited, with David Whyte, the December 2017 special issue of the International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy, on ‘Corruption Downunder’.

Workshop: Coercive Control

  1.  Kate Fitz-Gibbon
  2. Sandra Walklate
  3. Rachel Neil
  4. Refreshments following Coercive Control
  5. Book Launch – CJRC staff

Last week the Crime and Justice Research Centre and School of Justice hosted a workshop on ‘Coercive Control‘.  The purpose of this workshop was to examine the efficacy of the implementation of recent legislation alongside subjecting this concept to further critical interrogation with a view to examining its potential for other jurisdictions.

The workshop panel discussed the concept of Coercive Control from different points of view and applications, giving the audience a well-rounded perspective on the topic.

Speakers included Kate Fitz-Gibbon, a Senior Lecturer in Criminology at Monash University, and a member of the Monash Gender and Family Violence Research Program. Her research examines family violence, the law of homicide, youth justice and the impact of criminal law reform across Australian and international jurisdictions.

Rachel Neil is the Principal Solicitor of the Women’s Legal Service (WLS). Rachel is passionate about providing vulnerable women with high quality legal support and working towards a future where all women are free from violence.

Sandra Walklate is Eleanor Rathbone Chair of Sociology at the University of Liverpool (U.K.), co-joint Chair of Criminology at Monash University and an Adjunct Professor at the QUT School of Justice. She is currently Editor in Chief of the British Journal of Criminology and in July 2018 becomes president elect of the British Criminology Society. She is internationally recognised for her work on criminal victimisation (including terrorism) and gender and violence.

The event proved very popular with approximately 100 registered.

Following the event there was a celebration of books recently published by Crime and Justice Research Centre members since 2016.