The Australian Law Reform Commission Report on the Family Law System: Implications for Domestic Violence

The Australian Law Reform Commission Report on the Family Law System: Implications for Domestic Violence

The Australian Law Reform Commission (ALRC) Review of the Family Law System is the first comprehensive review of Australia’s family law system since its commencement more than 40 years ago.The ALRC Report on the Review of the Family Law System findings and recommendations have serious implications for domestic violence, and women and children will be deeply affected by how they are implemented. Please join us for an interactive discussion and networking luncheon to consider the report and recommendations for domestic violence cases as part of Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

This is a partnership event between Brisbane Domestic Violence Service and QUT Law. Read more

Reflections on Women, Men, Sexual Violence, and #MeToo

Qld Police Commissioner Ian Stewart, Centre Director Prof. Melissa Bull, Prof. James Messerschmidt, Belinda Cox, Assoc. Prof. Michael Flood

The #MeToo movement has drawn national and global attention to the problems of sexual harassment and abuse. A recent, popular public event at the Queensland University of Technology explored the #MeToo campaign, how women and men have responded to it, and the roles that men can play in building a community free of sexual violence and abuse.

The public event, titled “Reflections on Women, Men, Sexual Violence, and #MeToo”, examined the promise and pitfalls of current efforts to end sexual violence, and the role of men in sexual violence prevention. The buzz of conversation during and after the event was a clear sign that it had prompted thought and reflection.

Two leading international experts presented to the 90 or so researchers, professionals, and community members in attendance. James W. Messerschmidt is a Distinguished University Professor of Sociology at the University of Southern Maine, USA, author of the recent book Hegemonic Masculinity, and an Adjunct Professor at QUT’s School of Justice, and the event was timed to take advantage of his visit to QUT. Dr Michael Flood is an Associate Professor at QUT and author of Engaging Men and Boys in Violence Prevention. The event was chaired by Belinda Cox, a longstanding domestic violence advocate.

Attendees at the event included Police Commissioner Ian Stewart, Deputy Commissioner Michael Wassing of the Queensland Fire and Emergency Services, Professor Belinda Carpenter, Assistance Dean (Research) in the QUT Faculty of Law, and a host of others.

There was lively discussion after Messerschmidt’s and Flood’s presentations. Some participants took up Messerschmidt’s assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of the #MeToo campaign. They asked: does #MeToo include the experiences of women beyond the white, wealthy Hollywood celebrities on whom the media has focused? Will the campaign lead to real social change? Other participants asked about the challenges of engaging men in positive change. What role can fathers play in encouraging non-violent futures for their sons and daughters? How do we make sure that women’s voices continue to be heard? And, above all, how can we encourage well-meaning men to take part in working for change?

Workshop – Bogota Universidad Catolica de Colombia – 6-8 November 2019

Conflict, Power and Justice in the Global South

Academic knowledge about conflict, power and justice has generally been sourced from a select number of countries from the Global North, whose journals, conferences, publishers and universities dominate the intellectual landscape. In the last decades, there have been substantial efforts to undo these colonized ways of producing knowledge in this field.

This three-day workshop in Colombia brings together scholars, practitioners and activists from across the globe to contribute to this task of southernizing and democratising knowledge.

The workshop aims to link northern and southern activists and scholars in a collective project to create globally connected critical and innovative knowledges. It builds upon the international workshop on Southern Criminology co-hosted by QUT and Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Argentina in November 2018; and seeks to combine presentations with group discussions around the theoretical and conceptual foundations of the Southern Criminology project.

This workshop will be co-hosted by Queensland University of Technology, Australia; Universidad Autónoma de México; Universidad Católica Colombia; University of Essex, UK; Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Argentina; University of Northumbria, UK; and, University of Oslo, Norway.

Abstracts of 250 words

Due 30 June 2019

Early submission advised as the workshop is limited to 100

Email to:  justice@qut.edu.au

The workshop will be convened in two languages: Spanish and English. Selected papers will be published as a Special Edition of Critical Criminology

 

Public Lecture: Good Universities or Ghastly Futures: How can we find a democratic path for higher education and research?

Join us for a keynote presentation with Emerita Professor Raewyn Connell where she will address a ‘big idea’ that is central to social democracy and justice, access to knowledge and participation in Australian public life.

Professor Connell is an internationally renowned scholar and public intellectual. An enduring theme throughout her career has been access to justice, whether this is in relation to education, or the impact of gender relations in everyday life. More recently this has been evident in her consideration of knowledge and global power, and the significance of this in the university context.

Raewyn’s more recent work is a critique of the Northern bias of mainstream social science and the colonial structures of knowledge. Her book Southern Theory (2007) discusses intellectuals and social theories from the global periphery and explores paths towards knowledge democracy on a world scale. In 2019 she will publish a new book that extends this work called Knowledge and Global Power. She will also publish a book about the impact of neo-liberalism on universities – called the Good University. This will be the topic of her lecture.

27 March 2019
5.30pm arrival (networking and refreshments)
6.00pm – 7.00pm
Gardens Theatre, X Block, QUT Gardens Point Campus, 2 George St, Brisbane

Dress: Smart Casual

Register here by 20 March 2019:  https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/good-universities-or-ghastly-futures-public-lecture-tickets-56025975200

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Call for Abstracts – Crime Justice and Social Democracy 5th Biennial International Conference

The 5th biennial international conference hosted by the Crime, Justice and Social Democracy Research Centre, Queensland University of Technology is being held 15-17 July 2019.

The conference is being convened at Broadbeach, a picturesque part of the Gold Coast in the south east corridor of Queensland, Australia. It has an international airport and is within close proximity to Asia and other parts of the Global South, as well as the beautiful beaches of the Gold Coast and its adjacent hinterland with rich and rare biodiversity.

This conference seeks to further build on and innovate in new and imaginative areas of criminological thought. This conference creates a globally connected space to enhance the dialogue between scholars and practitioners from the Global South and the Global North. The conference especially welcomes scholars from the global north – as a critical aim of the conference is to link northern and southern scholars in a collective project that will radically transnationalise the discipline into the future.

Information on each of our conference guest speakers including Keynote, International Visitors and Emerging Australian Scholars can be found here :

Further information about the conference, including information on how to submit abstracts, can be found on the conference website

Co-hosted international conference Southern Criminology, Santa Fe, Argentina

Around 100 scholars from Spain, Argentina, Brazil, Peru, Chile, Columbia, UK, America, Singapore and Australia met at the international conference on Southern Criminology, co-hosted by the Faculty of Law, QUT and the Faculty of Law, Universidad Nacional del Litorel, Argentina 7-9 November 2018. The papers were simultaneously translated to bridge global divides, enhance inter-lingual dialogue and cross-cultural communication. The event was attended by 13 staff from the School of Justice, Faculty of Law, QUT.

School of Justice, Faculty of Law Staff visit Faculty of Law, University of Buenos Aires

Aside

On Monday 10 November staff from the School of Justice, Faculty of Law QUT, visited the Faculty of Law, University of Buenos Aires (UBA), Argentina (Faculdad de Derecho UBA). Professor Diego Zysman from UBA, who is also an adjunct Professor in the Faculty of Law QUT, met the group from QUT to undertake a private tour of the magnificent building, paintings, sculpture, history and architecture. The faculty has played an important role in the building of Argentina as a democratic nation.13 of the country’s Presidents did their law degree here, as have many of the Judges who tried the military juntas. The most famous Raúl Alfonsín was the first elected president after the fall of the military dictatorship 10 December 1983. This year the university will celebrate 35 years since the return of democracy in Argentina.

 

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Professor Sandra Walklate: Crime, Justice and Social Democracy 5th Biennial International Conference, Gold Coast, 2019

Professor Sandra Walklate has been confirmed as the first International Guest for the Crime, Justice and Social Democracy Research Centre 5th Biennial Conference being held on the Gold Coast from 15-17 July 2019.

Sandra Walklate is currently Eleanor Rathbone Chair of Sociology at the University of Liverpool, conjoint Chair of Criminology at Monash University in Melbourne and an Adjunct Professor in the School of Social Justice, QUT. She has been Editor in Chief of the British Journal of Criminology and in July 2019 becomes President of the British Society of Criminology. She has been researching in the field of criminal victimisation since the early 1980s and her recent publications reflect her ongoing and critical interests in this field, and the capacity of criminology to make sense of the impact of violence in particular on women’s lives.

Professor Walklate joins our Keynote Speaker, Professor Meda Chesney-Lind.

Keep an eye on the conference website for more details about other International Guests and Emerging Australian Scholars.

Click on the following link to submit an abstract: http://crimejusticeconference.com.au/call-for-abstracts/

 

 

 

 

 

Event: Tuesday 23 October 2018 @ 6pm – A world without privacy – Australia’s role in an international privacy crisis


Dear Members and Friends of the AIIA QLD,

IMPORTANT: Please note a venue for this event has not been finalised. Members will be notified as soon as a location is confirmed. We urge members to register as this is a high-profile event on a major issue. Queensland Privacy Commissioner Philip Green is one of the panelists. You will note that the website lists the offices of Holding Redlich Lawyers as the venue. Please disregard this. It will be corrected when the new venue is known

Our next event is scheduled for TUESDAY the 23rd of October 2018, at 6 for 6:30pm. There will be a big turnout for this event. Please register by clicking here:  https://aiiaqld.tidyhq.com/public/schedule/events/21569-a-world-without-privacy-australia-s-role-in-an-international-privacy-crisis

All events are free for AIIA members. Non-members are welcome and can pay $15 (or $10 for student non-members) online while registering. Or they can pay at the door on the night. Drinks are available for purchase at the event, as well as copies of our latest policy commentary (which are free for our members). Details on all events for this month are available on our website and our Facebook page.

A world without privacy – Australia’s role in an international privacy crisis

An AIIA Qld Conversations event with Queensland Privacy Commissioner Philip Green, Angus Murray, and Dr Monique Mann

With the rise of social media platforms, digital profiles, transactions and subscriptions, an individuals’ data footprint is constantly expanding. Who owns that data? Is privacy a reality? And is Australian regulation tough enough? Both the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights recognise privacy as a fundamental human right. But are these conventions being undermined by a data driven economy and international security concerns. If so, what is the effect of this? Will a loss of privacy equal a loss of autonomy?

With Australia’s privacy legislation under review and consideration, we seek to discuss the effects this will have on the world’s perceptions on Australia’s relationship with privacy. In light of the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) setting the ‘golden standard’ on privacy, does Australia continue to lag behind? Join us for a conversation in which we discuss these important questions and more.

About our speakers

Philip Green was appointed to the position of Privacy Commissioner, Office of the Information Commissioner in December 2015. Philip has worked in many different Queensland Government roles and in private practice throughout his career.  Prior to his appointment as Privacy Commissioner, he was Executive Director, Small Business – Department of Tourism, Major Events, Small Business and the Commonwealth Games and has held this role since 2008.  He was responsible for leading Innovation Policy and Innovation Partnerships and Services and Office of Small Business Teams in the delivery of high level policy development, program management, service delivery and advice. Philip holds degrees in law and arts (with economic minor) and was admitted as a solicitor of the Supreme Court of Queensland and High Court of Australia in February 1992. As the Privacy Commissioner Philip actively promotes and champions privacy rights and responsibilities in Queensland. In his role as Privacy Commissioner, Philip leads the staff in OIC responsible for mediating privacy complaints which have not been resolved with the Queensland Government agency involved; conducting reviews and audits of privacy compliance; giving compliance notices for serious, flagrant or recurring breaches of the privacy principles; and waiving or modifying an agency’s privacy obligations for a particular purpose or project.

Angus Murray is a practising solicitor and human rights advocate. He is a Vice President of the Queensland Council for Civil Liberties, the Chair of Electronic Frontiers Australia’s Policy and Research Committee and a Partner and Trade Marks Attorney at Irish Bentley Lawyers. He is also a co-founder and national director of The Legal Forecast and a professional member of Australian Lawyers for Human Rights. He holds a Master of Laws from Stockholm University and his academic work has focused on the interaction between the right to privacy and the enforcement of intellectual property law.

Dr Monique Mann is the Vice Chancellor’s Research Fellow in Technology and Regulation at the Faculty of Law, Queensland University of Technology. She is a member of: The Crime, Justice and Social Democracy Research Centre (CJSDRC) at QUT Law; The Intellectual Property and Innovation Law (IPIL) Research Program at QUT Law; The International Law and Global Governance (ILGG) Research Program at QUT Law, and; The Digital Media Research Centre (DMRC) at QUT Creative Industries Faculty. Dr Mann is advancing a program of socio-legal research on the intersecting topics of algorithmic justice, police technology, surveillance, and transnational online policing. She is on the Board of Directors of the Australian Privacy Foundation.