Publication: “Sleeping the deep, deep sleep – the Hierarchy of Disaster” – Dr. Dean Biron

School of Justice affiliated academic Dr Dean Biron has published a new essay titled “Sleeping the deep, deep sleep.” Co-written with Dr Suzie Gibson of Charles Sturt University, the piece appears in Issue 229 of Overland Literary Journal:

https://overland.org.au/previous-issues/issue-229/essay-dean-biron-and-suzie-gibson/

Subtitled “The Hierarchy of Disaster,” the essay considers how human-made catastrophes are ordered so as to distinguish between worthy and unworthy victims. Commencing with a comparison of political and media responses to the 2001 terrorist attacks in the US and the 1984 Bhopal tragedy in India, the essay considers how many traumatic occurrences are elided from the collective memory and justice is denied to those victims of disasters which occur beyond the “self-reverent gaze” of Western society. It concludes by suggesting that the starting point to diminishing this hierarchy, and in turn confronting the ubiquity of disaster itself, must be an ethical recalibration on the part of first world governments.

In recent months Dean has also published work in The Guardian, The Conversation, Popular Music and Society and Metro Screen Journal.

Dean is currently coordinating the QUT Justice undergraduate subject ‘Deviance.’

In the media: “They are calculating: What makes women kill their partners”

 

Congratulations to QUT School of Justice sessional academic Dr Belinda Parker, who appeared in news.com.au discussing her thesis “Seven Deadly Sins – developing a situational understanding of homicide event motive”  – the seven motives that characterize solved homocides, based on the analysis of 149 Australian murders.

Read the full article here:

http://www.news.com.au/national/crime/they-are-calculating-what-makes-women-kill-their-partners/news-story/e5e6a97cc432c0f79363917471b78791#.2fvlp

Belinda’s PhD was supervised by Professor John Scott and Dr Claire Ferguson from QUT School of Justice.

 

 

 

Crime and Justice Research Centre Seminar Series – Doing Research in the Indigenous space – Associate Professor Hilde Tubex

Crime and Justice Research Centre Seminar Series with speaker Associate Professor Hilde Tubex
 
Topic: Doing Research in the Indigenous Space

Date:         Tuesday 13 February 2018
When:       4.00pm – 5.30pm
Venue:      C Block, level 4, room C412,
QUT Gardens Point Campus,
2 George Street, Brisbane

Register:  by Thursday 8 February 2018
by accepting calendar invitation or Emailing    mailto:law.research@qut.edu.au.

Abstract:
Over the last years, the focus of Assoc Professor Tubex’s research has been on Indigenous Peoples in the criminal justice system. Being a criminologist / penologist, this focus is not surprising, given the enormous overrepresentation of Indigenous Peoples in our punitive system. She has built experience over three research projects; starting with the ARC Future Fellowship in which she studied different penal cultures within Australia, based on the different imprisonment rates between Australian jurisdictions, with a particular focus on Indigenous overrepresentation. In this research she studied the causes of Indigenous offending and their presence in the criminal justice system from a theoretical perspective, followed by field work in the Kimberley in WA and Darwin and Alice Springs in the NT. In an ARC Linkage she is CI on a project investigating the validity of risk assessment tools for Indigenous sex offenders. Her specific role is to assist in the development of a methodology to establish culturally appropriate risk assessment tools, alongside an Indigenous psychologist and an Indigenous reference group. She recently completed a CRG funded project on building effective throughcare strategies for Indigenous offenders in WA and the NT, for which they did fieldwork in regional and remote communities in the Kimberley, Darwin, Alice Springs and the Tiwi Islands. They conducted 38 interviews involving 59 people from these communities and their service providers, using yarning as a data collection tool. However, doing research in the Indigenous space, being a non-Indigenous person, is not evident. In this presentation Assoc Professor Tubex would like to share her experiences over these projects and discuss consequences for practice and theory building

Associate Professor Hilde Tubex
Hilde Tubex is Associate Professor and Deputy Head of School, Research at the Law School of the University of Western Australia. Her areas of expertise are comparative criminology, and penal policy, Indigenous peoples and the criminal justice system. Between 2007 and 2011, she worked at the Department of Corrective Services in WA as Team Leader Research and Evaluation. Before migrating to Australia, Hilde worked as a researcher/lecturer at the Free University of Brussels, and as an advisor to the Belgian Minister of Justice and the Council of Europe.

 

US warrants could be used to access Australian data

phototonyphillips.com

CJRC member Dr Monique Mann spoke to the ABC today about the upcoming US Supreme Court case US v Microsoft Ireland.

This case has global significance as the US government’s position would effectively undermine the data protection and privacy laws of other countries by giving the US government the power to unilaterally seize data no matter where it is located (and without regard for laws protecting that data).

Dr Mann and Dr Ian Warren (Deakin University) examine this case in their chapter in the recently published Palgrave Handbook of Criminology and the Global South.

In Dr Mann’s role as Co-Chair of the Surveillance Committee and Director of the Australian Privacy Foundation she led Australian efforts to join an Amicus Brief by Privacy International in a coalition of 25 international human and digital rights organisations in support of Microsoft in the US Supreme Court case.

To read the chapter click here.

To read the ABC article click here.

 

Landmark Publication of Palgrave Handbook of Criminology and the Global South

Palgrave Handbook of Criminology and the Global South edited by Kerry Carrington, Russell Hogg, John Scott and Máximo Sozzo has just been published.

The first comprehensive collection of its kind, this handbook addresses the problem of knowledge production in criminology, redressing the global imbalance with an original focus on the Global South. Issues of vital criminological research and policy significance abound in the Global South, with important implications for South/North relations as well as global security and justice. In a world of high speed communication technologies and fluid national borders, empire building has shifted from colonising territories to colonising knowledge. The authors of this volume question whose voices, experiences, and theories are reflected in the discipline, and argue that diversity of discourse is more important now than ever before.     Approaching the subject from a range of historical, theoretical, and social perspectives, this collection promotes the Global South not only as a space for the production of knowledge, but crucially, as a source of innovative research and theory on crime and justice. Wide-ranging in scope and authoritative in theory, this study will appeal to scholars, activists, policy-makers, and students from a wide range of social science disciplines from both the Global North and South, including criminal justice, human rights, and penology.

For further details click here.

Here is what Emerita Professor Raewyn Connell has to say about this landmark collection:

“This Handbook embodies for criminology a revolutionary change that is influencing and challenging all the social sciences. This is work that prioritises the experience of colonized and postcolonial societies, and values the intellectual work done in the periphery. It does not abandon ideas and methods developed in the global North, but sets them in a different logic of knowledge-making. It calls their universality into question and combines them with very different agendas and perspectives. Once this process is set in motion, a vast terrain opens up.

While organized around the historical relations of colonization and post-colonial power, a Southern criminology does not produce simple categories. Both “North” and “South” name multiple and changing social formations. These complexities are well represented in this Handbook, ranging across affluent settler-colonial countries, poor developing countries, emerging economic powers, and the offshore transnational corporations that have increasingly replaced states as the centres of global capitalism.

Any Southern criminology must call into question familiar concepts and understandings. An important theme in this Handbook is the role of the state, conventionally seen as the source of law and embodiment of justice. Many of the contributions here recognize the pervasiveness of state violence and injustice in the making of global empire.

This Handbook has significance beyond its contribution to criminology and our understanding of the specifics of crime, policing and violence. It contributes to a major transformation of our knowledge of social processes in general. There are rich resources here, multiple points of view, a wealth of information and re-thinking. I hope their work travels widely into the world.’ (Raewyn Connell, University of Sydney, Australia)

For more reviews click here

Welcome Dr Laura Bedford

On Monday we welcomed Dr Laura Bedford as a new lecturer within the School of Justice, Faculty of Law, at QUT with a morning tea at The Gardens Café at Gardens Point.

Laura holds a PhD in Criminology, a MA in Economic History and a B. Soc Sci (Hons) in Political Science.  Laura has over 25 years experience in social and economic policy research and advocacy, working as a consultant and in senior roles in the public and private sector in South Africa and Australia.  Over the past two years, Laura has been employed by the Queensland Police Service as the lead researcher on a randomised controlled field trial which examined the impact of mobile technology on frontline policing.  Laura is currently interested in new directions in criminology, including the application of social and environment justice perspectives to problematise the translation of hegemonic criminological theory, and criminal justice practice, within the Global South.

We warmly welcome Laura to the team.

 

‘Examining Stakeholder Perceptions of Community Policing in the Pacific: A Pilot Study on Community Policing in Tuvalu’ presented by Dr. Danielle Watson

Research Seminar
 
Topic: ‘Examining Stakeholder Perceptions of Community Policing in the Pacific: A Pilot Study on Community Policing in Tuvalu’ presented by Dr. Danielle Watson

Please join members of the Crime and Justice Research Centre for the first in the seminar series for 2018.

Date:         Tuesday 23 January 2018
When:       4.00pm – 5.30pm
Venue:      C Block, Level 4, Room C412,
QUT Gardens Point Campus,
2 George Street, Brisbane

Register:  by Thursday 18 January 2018
by accepting the calendar invitation or emailing law.research@qut.edu.au

Abstract:
Recent dialogue about police capacity building in the Pacific region highlights the necessity of adapting and formulating context specific initiatives geared towards advancing jurisdictional agendas. What these discussions vaguely acknowledge is the uniqueness of member countries within the region with specific capacity building requirements and the need for development initiatives to match contextual challenges. Development initiatives should reflect consideration of police organizations role as the most visible arm of the state with responsibility for maintaining law and order, from a standpoint of promoting efficiency and effectiveness. Critical to Pacific police organizations capacity to execute the state mandate is the ability of officers to demonstrate the highest levels of accuracy and efficiency in conducting professional practice. My argument is that continued review of what is considered professional practice and examination of customer satisfaction with the service provided by police are of paramount importance to meeting the police mandate of maintaining law and order at the societal level.
The Tuvalu Police Service (TPS) has expressed its commitment to providing more service oriented policing underscored by professional codes of conduct, behaviors and performance. What presents a difficulty for the police organization, however, is the lack of capacity to drive, evaluate and strategically revise changes, and the inability to derive informed responses to societal stakeholder expectations. The organization therefore relies on donor aid countries to provide required assistance. Most recently, the University of the South Pacific was approached to assist with the collection and analysis of data to inform the TPS’s strategic planning and crime prevention model. The study is a subset of that initiative intended to provide assistance to the TPS by firstly, creating a model for assessing primary stakeholders (police and public) perceptions of and satisfaction with the provision of community policing services; secondly, conduct a comparative analysis of stakeholder perceptions and finally, offer recommendations for continued professional development of police officers in the area of community policing and propose an actionable direction for improved community policing based on the identified stakeholders’ positions. Danielle’s goal is to add to the ongoing dialogue about community policing initiatives in the Pacific and provide necessary data for continued reflection and revision of policing practices in developing Pacific islands.

Danielle is the coordinator of the Pacific Policing Programme at the University of the South Pacific, Fiji. She conducts research on police/civilian relations on the margins with particular interests in hotspot policing, police recruitment and training as well as many other areas specific to policing in developing country contexts. Her research interests are multidisciplinary in scope as she also conducts research geared towards the advancement of tertiary teaching and learning. She is the principal researcher on two ongoing projects “Policing Pacific Island Communities” and “Re-Imagining Graduate Supervision at Regional Universities”. She is also the lead author (with Erik Blair) of Reimagining Graduate Supervision in Developing Contexts: A Focus on Regional Universities (2018, Taylor and Francis), and sole author of a forthcoming Pivot Police and the Policed: Language and Power Relations on the Margins of the Global South (2018, Palgrave Macmillan)

 

 

10th ACS conference

Dear ACS Members, Scholars & Practitioners,

You are cordially invited to participate in the 10th Asian Criminological Society Annual Conference. This conference will be held in the City of Georgetown, Penang, Malaysia from 24th to 28th June 2018.

The primary objective of this conference is to bring together scholars, academics and practitioners working in the field, or in related disciplines, to share and exchange their knowledge and experiences. Scholars and practitioners from Asia and all over the world are therefore invited to attend.

We encourage scholars, academicians, and, in particular, practitioners to not only attend but also to present papers. Presentations on a wide range of topics in the area are welcomed, and papers synthesizing theory and practice are especially encouraged.

If you are interested in participating in this conference, please visit our website (https://events.mcpfpg.org/acsc2018/).

Thank you.

Associate Professor Dr. P.Sundramoorthy

Organizing Chairman

10th ACS Annual Conference

email: moorthy@usm.my

The Secretariat of Asian Criminological Society

website: www.acs001.com

email: asiancriminologist@gmail.com

New Book Series: Perspectives on Law, Crime and Justice from the Global South

Academic perspectives on crime, law and justice have generally been sourced from a select number of countries from the Global North, whose journals, conferences, publishers and universities dominate the intellectual landscape. As a consequence research about these matters in contexts of the Global South have tended to uncritically reproduce concepts and arguments developed elsewhere to understand local problems and processes. In recent times, there have been substantial efforts to undo this colonized way of thinking leading to a burgeoning body of new work. This new book series aims to publish and promote this innovative new scholarship, with a long term view of bridging global divides and enhancing cognitive justice. The editors are especially keen to solicit manuscripts from authors from South America, Oceania, and South Africa.

Series Editors: Kerry Carrington Máximo Sozzo

submit manuscript proposals to kerry.carrington@qut.edu.au

10th ACS conference – Call for abstract

Dear ACS Members, Scholars & Practitioners,

You are cordially invited to participate in the 10th Asian Criminological Society Annual Conference. This conference will be held in the City of Georgetown, Penang, Malaysia from 24th to 28th June 2018.

The primary objective of this conference is to bring together scholars, academics and practitioners working in the field, or in related disciplines, to share and exchange their knowledge and experiences. Scholars and practitioners from Asia and all over the world are therefore invited to attend.

We encourage scholars, academicians, and, in particular, practitioners to not only attend but also to present papers. Presentations on a wide range of topics in the area are welcomed, and papers synthesizing theory and practice are especially encouraged.

If you are interested in participating in this conference, please visit our website (https://events.mcpfpg.org/acsc2018/).

Thank you.

Associate Professor Dr. P.Sundramoorthy

Organizing Chairman

10th ACS Annual Conference

email: moorthy@usm.my

The Secretariat of Asian Criminological Society

website: www.acs001.com

email: asiancriminologist@gmail.com