Recently published: 2nd edition of the Routledge Handbook of Critical Criminology

The 2nd edition of the Routledge Handbook of Critical Criminology, edited by CJRC Adjunct Professor Walter S. DeKeseredy and CJRC Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz was published on 17 March 2018. The updated edition includes forty chapters and more than a dozen contributions by CJRC staff and adjunct professors such as:

Left realism: a new look (Walter S. DeKeseredy and Martin D. Schwartz)
Southern criminology (Kerry Carrington, Russell Hogg, and Maximo Sozzo)
Masculinities and Crime (James W. Messerschmidt and Stephen Tomsen)
Queer criminology (Carrie Buist, Emily Lenning, and Matthew Ball)
Critical Green criminology (Rob White)
Green cultural criminology (Avi Brisman and Nigel South)
Towards a Criminology of War, Violence and Militarism (Ross McGarry and Sandra Walklate)
Terrorism. The Problem with Radicalization: Overlooking the elephants in the room (Sandra Walklate and Gaybe Mythen)
Thinking critically about contemporary adult pornography and woman abuse (Walter S. DeKeseredy and Amanda Hall-Sanchez)
Antifeminism and backlash: a critical criminological imperative (Molly Dragiewicz)
A critical examination of girls’ violence and juvenile justice (Meda Chesney-Lind and Lisa Pasko)
The future of a critical rural criminology (Joseph F. Donnermeyer)
Violence and social policy (Elliott Currie)
Confronting adult pornography (Walter DeKeseredy)

An Author meets critics session will be held at the American Society of Criminology meetings in Atlanta, Georgia in November 2018.

Coercive Control Workshop and Celebration of Books

Coercive Control Workshop 

The concept of ‘Coercive Control’ as a means of making sense of the nature and extent of violence(s) in women’s everyday lives has been around since the early 1980s. However its recent revitalisation by Evan Stark has resulted in rejuvenated interest in it in the policy domain. In England and Wales an offence of coercive control was introduced in December 2015 and a recent special edition of Criminology and Criminal Justice exposes this concept and associated legal and professional practices to international interrogation. The purpose of this workshop is to examine the efficacy of the implementation of this recent legislation alongside subjecting this concept to further critical interrogation with a view to examining its potential value for other jurisdictions.

Please join the Crime and Justice Research Centre and the School of Justice for a workshop on ‘Coercive Control’, with leading practitioners and academics. Following the event, there will be a Celebration of Books recently published by Crime and Justice Research Centre members.

March 15, 2018

3.00 – 5.00pm
Including light refreshments
OJW Room, Level 12, S Block, QUT Gardens Point Campus

This event requires registration.  To register, please email Brigid Xavier – brigid.xavier@qut.edu.au.  Eventbrite link to follow. 

Speakers

Kate Fitz-Gibbon
Senior Lecturer in Criminology at Monash University.

Sandra Walklate
Eleanor Rathbone Chair of Sociology at the University of Liverpool (U.K)

Rachel Neil

Principal Solicitor of the Women’s Legal Service (WLS)

 

Book: Biometrics, Crime and Security

 

Crime and Justice Research Centre Dr Monique Mann recently published a book on Biometrics, Crime and Security with co-authors Dr Marcus Smith (Centre for Law and Justice at Charles Sturt University) and Associate Professor Gregor Urbas (Faculty of Business, Government and Law at the University of Canberra).

The book appears in the Routledge Law, Science and Society Series and can be purchased at this link: https://www.routledge.com/Biometrics-Crime-and-Security/Smith-Mann-Urbas/p/book/9780815378068

The book addresses the use of biometrics – including fingerprint identification, DNA identification and facial recognition – in the criminal justice system: balancing the need to ensure society is protected from harms, such as crime and terrorism, while also preserving individual rights. It offers a comprehensive discussion of biometric identification that includes a consideration of: basic scientific principles, their historical development, the perspectives of political philosophy, critical security and surveillance studies; but especially the relevant law, policy and regulatory issues.

 

US warrants could be used to access Australian data

phototonyphillips.com

CJRC member Dr Monique Mann spoke to the ABC today about the upcoming US Supreme Court case US v Microsoft Ireland.

This case has global significance as the US government’s position would effectively undermine the data protection and privacy laws of other countries by giving the US government the power to unilaterally seize data no matter where it is located (and without regard for laws protecting that data).

Dr Mann and Dr Ian Warren (Deakin University) examine this case in their chapter in the recently published Palgrave Handbook of Criminology and the Global South.

In Dr Mann’s role as Co-Chair of the Surveillance Committee and Director of the Australian Privacy Foundation she led Australian efforts to join an Amicus Brief by Privacy International in a coalition of 25 international human and digital rights organisations in support of Microsoft in the US Supreme Court case.

To read the chapter click here.

To read the ABC article click here.

 

Landmark Publication of Palgrave Handbook of Criminology and the Global South

Palgrave Handbook of Criminology and the Global South edited by Kerry Carrington, Russell Hogg, John Scott and Máximo Sozzo has just been published.

The first comprehensive collection of its kind, this handbook addresses the problem of knowledge production in criminology, redressing the global imbalance with an original focus on the Global South. Issues of vital criminological research and policy significance abound in the Global South, with important implications for South/North relations as well as global security and justice. In a world of high speed communication technologies and fluid national borders, empire building has shifted from colonising territories to colonising knowledge. The authors of this volume question whose voices, experiences, and theories are reflected in the discipline, and argue that diversity of discourse is more important now than ever before.     Approaching the subject from a range of historical, theoretical, and social perspectives, this collection promotes the Global South not only as a space for the production of knowledge, but crucially, as a source of innovative research and theory on crime and justice. Wide-ranging in scope and authoritative in theory, this study will appeal to scholars, activists, policy-makers, and students from a wide range of social science disciplines from both the Global North and South, including criminal justice, human rights, and penology.

For further details click here.

Here is what Emerita Professor Raewyn Connell has to say about this landmark collection:

“This Handbook embodies for criminology a revolutionary change that is influencing and challenging all the social sciences. This is work that prioritises the experience of colonized and postcolonial societies, and values the intellectual work done in the periphery. It does not abandon ideas and methods developed in the global North, but sets them in a different logic of knowledge-making. It calls their universality into question and combines them with very different agendas and perspectives. Once this process is set in motion, a vast terrain opens up.

While organized around the historical relations of colonization and post-colonial power, a Southern criminology does not produce simple categories. Both “North” and “South” name multiple and changing social formations. These complexities are well represented in this Handbook, ranging across affluent settler-colonial countries, poor developing countries, emerging economic powers, and the offshore transnational corporations that have increasingly replaced states as the centres of global capitalism.

Any Southern criminology must call into question familiar concepts and understandings. An important theme in this Handbook is the role of the state, conventionally seen as the source of law and embodiment of justice. Many of the contributions here recognize the pervasiveness of state violence and injustice in the making of global empire.

This Handbook has significance beyond its contribution to criminology and our understanding of the specifics of crime, policing and violence. It contributes to a major transformation of our knowledge of social processes in general. There are rich resources here, multiple points of view, a wealth of information and re-thinking. I hope their work travels widely into the world.’ (Raewyn Connell, University of Sydney, Australia)

For more reviews click here

New Book Series: Perspectives on Law, Crime and Justice from the Global South

Academic perspectives on crime, law and justice have generally been sourced from a select number of countries from the Global North, whose journals, conferences, publishers and universities dominate the intellectual landscape. As a consequence research about these matters in contexts of the Global South have tended to uncritically reproduce concepts and arguments developed elsewhere to understand local problems and processes. In recent times, there have been substantial efforts to undo this colonized way of thinking leading to a burgeoning body of new work. This new book series aims to publish and promote this innovative new scholarship, with a long term view of bridging global divides and enhancing cognitive justice. The editors are especially keen to solicit manuscripts from authors from South America, Oceania, and South Africa.

Series Editors: Kerry Carrington Máximo Sozzo

submit manuscript proposals to kerry.carrington@qut.edu.au

INTRODUCING NEW BOOK SERIES: Routledge Studies in Crime and Justice in Asia and the Global South Call for Proposals

Crime and justice studies, as with much social science, has concentrated mainly on problems in the metropolitan centres of the Global North, while Asia and the Global South have remained largely invisible in criminological thinking. Routledge is now accepting proposals for a brand new research series which aims to redress this imbalance by showcasing exciting new ways of thinking and doing crime and justice research from the global periphery. Edited by John Scott and Russell Hogg or Queensland University of Technology and by Wing Hong Chui of City University of Hong Kong, the series provides an opportunity to illustrate the work of emerging and established scholars who are challenging traditional paradigms in the fields of crime and justice. Bringing together scholarly work from a range of disciplines, from criminology, law, and sociology to psychology, cultural geography and comparative social sciences, the series will offer grounded empirical research and fresh theoretical approaches and cover a range of pressing topics, including international corruption, drug use, environmental issues, sex work, organized crime, innovative models of justice, and punishment and penology.

Please contact John Scott (j31.scott@qut.edu.au), Russell Hogg (russell.hogg@qut.edu.au), Wing Hong Chui (eric.chui@cityu.edu.hk) for more details, or alternatively Tom Sutton (Thomas.Sutton@tandf.co.uk) , Senior Editor for Criminology at Routledge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Webinar- Abusive Endings: Separation and Divorce Violence Against Women, a conversation with the authors

Join CJRC Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz, CJRC Adjunct Professor Walter DeKeseredy and Professor Martin Schwartz for an international webinar

Abusive Endings: Separation and Divorce Violence Against Women, a conversation with the authors

Read more

Recently Published: “The Routledge International Handbook of Rural Criminology”

The Routledge International Handbook of Rural Criminology, edited by Adjunct Professor Joseph Donnermeyer, has recently been published and features chapters by CJRC researchers Professor Kerry Carrington, Professor Russell Hogg, Professor John Scott and Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz.  Read more