CALLING ALL STUDENTS – QUT Justice Society Event

Come along to the biggest event of the QUT Justice Society.  This is a great opportunity for students to make connections with justice professionals.

WHO: The event is open to all students (must be 18+ years old)

WHEN: Wednesday 3rd October, 6pm-9pm

WHERE: Darling & Co., Paddington

DRESS: Business attire

COST: $20 for members; $25 for non-members (tickets include membership)

All details and tickets can be found on the Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/1796169797133417/

 

Congratulations to Dr Papazian

Congratulations to School of Justice PhD graduate Dr Natasha Papazian. Her thesis Transgender domestic violence: An analysis of the transgender community and service provision in Queensland examines domestic violence from the perspectives of transgender people and LGBT-friendly service providers. Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz and Associate Professor Matthew Ball supervised the project.

Read more

Event: Cybercrime and Counter Terrorism Panel

The QUT Justice Society and Women in Technology proudly presents: A Professional Panel on Cyber Crime and Counter Terrorism

These societies, who are both passionate about the intersection of technology and the justice system, have come together to provide students a unique opportunity – to discover how cyber crime and counter terrorism works within and influences our justice system. This evening is a great opportunity to listen to amazing professionals and their career journeys in the field. It’s also a fantastic way to network with the professionals and other students and possibly open up more opportunities for yourself!

So if you’re trying to figure out what field of justice works well for you or if you know that cyber crime and/or counter terrorism is what you want to work in and want some more information or if you’re just really interested in the area, then come along for a lovely and very informative evening with us!

Date: Tuesday, 1 May 2018
Time: 5:45pm for a 6pm start
Location: Z1064 Gibson Room, Z Block, QUT Gardens Point Campus
Who: Students of all degrees are more than welcome

Catering will be provided. Please purchase your FREE tickets to assist with catering and dietary requirements.

To purchase FREE tickets click here

Publication: The limits of (digital) constitutionalism: Exploring the privacy-security (im)balance in Australia

Crime and Justice Research Centre members Dr Monique Mann and Dr Angela Daly, along with Justice PhD Candidate Michael Wilson, and QUT Law Associate Professor Nic Suzor recently published ‘The limits of (digital) constitutionalism: Exploring the privacy-security (im)balance in Australia’ in the International Communication Gazette.

 Abstract

This article explores the challenges of digital constitutionalism in practice through a case study examining how concepts of privacy and security have been framed and contested in Australian cyber security and telecommunications policy-making over the last decade. The Australian Government has formally committed to ‘internet freedom’ norms, including privacy, through membership of the Freedom Online Coalition (FOC). Importantly, however, this commitment is non-binding and designed primarily to guide the development of policy by legislators and the executive government. Through this analysis, we seek to understand if, and how, principles of digital constitutionalism have been incorporated at the national level. Our analysis suggests a fundamental challenge for the project of digital constitutionalism in developing and implementing principles that have practical or legally binding impact on domestic telecommunications and cyber security policy. Australia is the only major Western liberal democracy without comprehensive constitutional human rights or a legislated bill of rights at the federal level; this means that the task of ‘balancing’ what are conceived as competing rights is left only to the legislature. Our analysis shows that despite high-level commitments to privacy as per the Freedom Online Coalition, individual rights are routinely discounted against collective rights to security. We conclude by arguing that, at least in Australia, the domestic conditions limit the practical application and enforcement of digital constitutionalism’s norms.

Keywords

Cyber security, digital constitutionalism, human rights, metadata retention, online surveillance, privacy, security, securitization

You can read the full article here: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1748048518757141?journalCode=gazb#articleShareContainer

 

 

Congratulations Dr Le

CJRC PhD student Tien Hoang Le has been notified that he has been awarded a Doctor of Philosophy for his thesis on Human trafficking in Vietnam: Preventing crime and protecting victims through interagency cooperation. Le’s Principal Supervisor was Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz and his Associate Supervisor was Professor Kerry Carrington. Read more