Publication: The legal geographies of transnational cyber-prosecutions: Extradition, human rights and forum shifting

Crime and Justice Research Centre member Dr Monique Mann, along with Deakin University colleagues Dr Ian Warren and Ms Sally Kennedy, recently published ‘The legal geographies of transnational cyber-prosecutions: Extradition, human rights and forum shifting’ in the leading international (Q1) journal Global Crime.

The article describes legal and human rights issues in three cases of transnational online offending involving extradition requests by the United States (US). These cases were selected as all suspects claimed the negative impacts of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) were sufficient to deny extradition on human rights grounds. The authors demonstrate how recent developments in UK and Irish extradition law raise human rights and prosecutorial challenges specific to online offending that are not met by established protections under domestic and internationally sanctioned approaches to extradition, or human rights, law. In these cases, although the allegedly unlawful conduct occurred exclusively online and concurrent jurisdiction enables prosecution at both the source and location of harm, the authors demonstrate why national courts hearing extradition challenges are extremely reluctant to shift the trial forum. They conclude by discussing the implications of the new geographies of online offending for future criminological research and transnational criminal justice.

Keywords: Extradition, computer hacking, legal geography, human rights, autism spectrum disorders, Asperger’s syndrome.

The article can be accessed at this link:

Publication: Gender and Age in the Construction of Male Youth in the European Migration “Crisis”

The following article was recently published by Dr. Helen Berents from QUT School of Justice and member of CJRC, along with colleagues from Monash University and Salvation Army UK.  This article was published in Signs – a leading journal (Q1) for feminist politics.


Displacement is clearly gendered; age also has a strong influence on outcomes and experiences for the displaced, including a significant impact on how they are understood by the public and policy makers. It is important to keep this in mind when considering how children and youth are understood within contexts of conflict and insecurity, how they are affected by these forces, and how they navigate their lives in these contexts, especially in seeking peaceful outcomes. Here we engage with the current so-called European migration crisis as a potential watershed moment in understandings of children and youth as refugees. In particular, we suggest that the public representations of young people in this context can be deeply influenced by stereotypes and assumptions around gender and age that may—intentionally or inadvertently—lead to greater insecurity for people of diverse genders and ages. Likewise, we argue that when considering scholarship, policy, and practice in relation to migration, it is critical to develop and apply a lens that accounts for both gender and age.

A link to the full article can be found here


New Issue: International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy

A new issue of International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy has been published today.  With authors from Brazil/Portugal, Croatia, Italy, Norway, Sweden, the United Kingdom, the United States and Australia, the journal’s global representation continues.

There are nine articles in this issue book-ended by Sandra Walklate’s “Criminology, Gender and Risk:  The Dilemmas of Northern Theorising for Southern Responses to Intimate Partner Violence”, and Aleksandar Marsavelski and John Braithwaite who provide insights into “The Best Way to Rob a Bank”.  Additionally, Matt Ball has authored one of two terrific book reviews:  Marianna Valverde’s Michel Voucault (2017).

The following articles are free to download and share.

Current Issue

Vol 7 No 1 (2018): International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy

Published: 2018-03-01


Sandra Walklate


Thiago Pierobom de Avila


Jason Spraitz, Kendra N Bowen, Louisa Strange


Tully O’Neill


Antonio Iudici, Fela Boccato, Elena Faccio


Sophie De’Ath, Catherine Anne Flynn, Melanie Field-Pimm


David Rodríguez Goyes


Ida Nafstad


Aleksandar Marsavelski, John Braithwaite


Book Reviews



View All Issues

Coercive Control Workshop and Celebration of Books

Coercive Control Workshop 

The concept of ‘Coercive Control’ as a means of making sense of the nature and extent of violence(s) in women’s everyday lives has been around since the early 1980s. However its recent revitalisation by Evan Stark has resulted in rejuvenated interest in it in the policy domain. In England and Wales an offence of coercive control was introduced in December 2015 and a recent special edition of Criminology and Criminal Justice exposes this concept and associated legal and professional practices to international interrogation. The purpose of this workshop is to examine the efficacy of the implementation of this recent legislation alongside subjecting this concept to further critical interrogation with a view to examining its potential value for other jurisdictions.

Please join the Crime and Justice Research Centre and the School of Justice for a workshop on ‘Coercive Control’, with leading practitioners and academics. Following the event, there will be a Celebration of Books recently published by Crime and Justice Research Centre members.

March 15, 2018

3.00 – 5.00pm
Including light refreshments
OJW Room, Level 12, S Block, QUT Gardens Point Campus

This event requires registration.  To register, please email Brigid Xavier –  Eventbrite link to follow. 


Kate Fitz-Gibbon
Senior Lecturer in Criminology at Monash University.

Sandra Walklate
Eleanor Rathbone Chair of Sociology at the University of Liverpool (U.K)

Rachel Neil

Principal Solicitor of the Women’s Legal Service (WLS)


Media discourse surrounding ‘non-ideal’ victims – The Ashley Madison data breach case

Media discourses surrounding ‘non-ideal’ victims

The case of the Ashley Madison data breach

Cassandra Cross, Megan Parker and Daniel Sansom


Data breaches are an increasingly common event across businesses globally. Many companies have been subject to large-scale breaches. Consequently, the exposure of 37 million customers of the Ashley Madison website is not an extraordinary event in and of itself. However, Ashley Madison is an online dating website predominantly known for facilitating extramarital affairs. Therefore, the nature of this website (and business) is very different from those that have previously been breached. This article examines one of the media discourses surrounding the victims of the Ashley Madison data breach. It particular, it illustrates examples of victim blaming evident in the print media towards individuals (or customers) who had their personal details exposed. Importantly, it highlights the emerging tension within this particular case, of the strong victim blaming narrative contrasted against those who attempted to challenge this discourse and refocus attention on the actual offenders, and the criminality of the act. The article concludes that victims of this data breach were exposed to victim blaming, based on the perceived immorality of the website they were connected to and their actions in subscribing, rather than focusing on the data breach itself, and the blatant criminality of the offenders who exposed the sensitive information.

Available online at the International Review of Victimology



Book: Biometrics, Crime and Security


Crime and Justice Research Centre Dr Monique Mann recently published a book on Biometrics, Crime and Security with co-authors Dr Marcus Smith (Centre for Law and Justice at Charles Sturt University) and Associate Professor Gregor Urbas (Faculty of Business, Government and Law at the University of Canberra).

The book appears in the Routledge Law, Science and Society Series and can be purchased at this link:

The book addresses the use of biometrics – including fingerprint identification, DNA identification and facial recognition – in the criminal justice system: balancing the need to ensure society is protected from harms, such as crime and terrorism, while also preserving individual rights. It offers a comprehensive discussion of biometric identification that includes a consideration of: basic scientific principles, their historical development, the perspectives of political philosophy, critical security and surveillance studies; but especially the relevant law, policy and regulatory issues.


Publication: “Sleeping the deep, deep sleep – the Hierarchy of Disaster” – Dr. Dean Biron

School of Justice affiliated academic Dr Dean Biron has published a new essay titled “Sleeping the deep, deep sleep.” Co-written with Dr Suzie Gibson of Charles Sturt University, the piece appears in Issue 229 of Overland Literary Journal:

Subtitled “The Hierarchy of Disaster,” the essay considers how human-made catastrophes are ordered so as to distinguish between worthy and unworthy victims. Commencing with a comparison of political and media responses to the 2001 terrorist attacks in the US and the 1984 Bhopal tragedy in India, the essay considers how many traumatic occurrences are elided from the collective memory and justice is denied to those victims of disasters which occur beyond the “self-reverent gaze” of Western society. It concludes by suggesting that the starting point to diminishing this hierarchy, and in turn confronting the ubiquity of disaster itself, must be an ethical recalibration on the part of first world governments.

In recent months Dean has also published work in The Guardian, The Conversation, Popular Music and Society and Metro Screen Journal.

Dean is currently coordinating the QUT Justice undergraduate subject ‘Deviance.’

US warrants could be used to access Australian data

CJRC member Dr Monique Mann spoke to the ABC today about the upcoming US Supreme Court case US v Microsoft Ireland.

This case has global significance as the US government’s position would effectively undermine the data protection and privacy laws of other countries by giving the US government the power to unilaterally seize data no matter where it is located (and without regard for laws protecting that data).

Dr Mann and Dr Ian Warren (Deakin University) examine this case in their chapter in the recently published Palgrave Handbook of Criminology and the Global South.

In Dr Mann’s role as Co-Chair of the Surveillance Committee and Director of the Australian Privacy Foundation she led Australian efforts to join an Amicus Brief by Privacy International in a coalition of 25 international human and digital rights organisations in support of Microsoft in the US Supreme Court case.

To read the chapter click here.

To read the ABC article click here.


Landmark Publication of Palgrave Handbook of Criminology and the Global South

Palgrave Handbook of Criminology and the Global South edited by Kerry Carrington, Russell Hogg, John Scott and Máximo Sozzo has just been published.

The first comprehensive collection of its kind, this handbook addresses the problem of knowledge production in criminology, redressing the global imbalance with an original focus on the Global South. Issues of vital criminological research and policy significance abound in the Global South, with important implications for South/North relations as well as global security and justice. In a world of high speed communication technologies and fluid national borders, empire building has shifted from colonising territories to colonising knowledge. The authors of this volume question whose voices, experiences, and theories are reflected in the discipline, and argue that diversity of discourse is more important now than ever before.     Approaching the subject from a range of historical, theoretical, and social perspectives, this collection promotes the Global South not only as a space for the production of knowledge, but crucially, as a source of innovative research and theory on crime and justice. Wide-ranging in scope and authoritative in theory, this study will appeal to scholars, activists, policy-makers, and students from a wide range of social science disciplines from both the Global North and South, including criminal justice, human rights, and penology.

For further details click here.

Here is what Emerita Professor Raewyn Connell has to say about this landmark collection:

“This Handbook embodies for criminology a revolutionary change that is influencing and challenging all the social sciences. This is work that prioritises the experience of colonized and postcolonial societies, and values the intellectual work done in the periphery. It does not abandon ideas and methods developed in the global North, but sets them in a different logic of knowledge-making. It calls their universality into question and combines them with very different agendas and perspectives. Once this process is set in motion, a vast terrain opens up.

While organized around the historical relations of colonization and post-colonial power, a Southern criminology does not produce simple categories. Both “North” and “South” name multiple and changing social formations. These complexities are well represented in this Handbook, ranging across affluent settler-colonial countries, poor developing countries, emerging economic powers, and the offshore transnational corporations that have increasingly replaced states as the centres of global capitalism.

Any Southern criminology must call into question familiar concepts and understandings. An important theme in this Handbook is the role of the state, conventionally seen as the source of law and embodiment of justice. Many of the contributions here recognize the pervasiveness of state violence and injustice in the making of global empire.

This Handbook has significance beyond its contribution to criminology and our understanding of the specifics of crime, policing and violence. It contributes to a major transformation of our knowledge of social processes in general. There are rich resources here, multiple points of view, a wealth of information and re-thinking. I hope their work travels widely into the world.’ (Raewyn Connell, University of Sydney, Australia)

For more reviews click here

New Book Series: Perspectives on Law, Crime and Justice from the Global South

Academic perspectives on crime, law and justice have generally been sourced from a select number of countries from the Global North, whose journals, conferences, publishers and universities dominate the intellectual landscape. As a consequence research about these matters in contexts of the Global South have tended to uncritically reproduce concepts and arguments developed elsewhere to understand local problems and processes. In recent times, there have been substantial efforts to undo this colonized way of thinking leading to a burgeoning body of new work. This new book series aims to publish and promote this innovative new scholarship, with a long term view of bridging global divides and enhancing cognitive justice. The editors are especially keen to solicit manuscripts from authors from South America, Oceania, and South Africa.

Series Editors: Kerry Carrington Máximo Sozzo

submit manuscript proposals to