Welcome Michael Chataway, Lecturer, QUT School of Justice

CJRC welcomes the appointment of Mr Michael Chataway as Lecturer, QUT School of Justice.

Michael holds a Bachelor of Psychological Science, and a Bachelor of Criminology and Criminal Justice Hons Class 1 from Griffith University. He has recently completed his PhD Dissertation titled: Fear of Crime in Time and Place: Developing and Testing a New Momentary Model of Victimisation Worry. His research focuses on how young people interpret and perceive crime and disorder within their everyday environments.  In addition to his theoretical contributions to the fear of crime literature, Michael is among a handful of researchers in the world currently using mobile apps to collect context-dependent information on fear of crime and victimisation risk.

Michael’s research has been published in national and international journals including the Journal of Environmental Psychology, the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology, and the Journal of Applied Geography. His mobile app research and projects with colleagues have been featured by ABC Radio – Gold Coast, The Brisbane Times, and the Gold Coast Bulletin.  Michael’s other research interests include: social geography, social and environmental psychology, attitudinal research, and innovative research methods.  His future work aims to integrate these research interests to develop innovative strategies for reducing fear of crime using dynamic mobile sensors.

We welcome Michael to the School, and look forward to his valuable contribution.

 

Research meets art: CJRC member works with photographer selected for National Photographic Portrait Prize

Crime and Justice Research Member Dr Monique Mann’s research on facial recognition has inspired Anna Sinclair – a photographer based in Sydney – who has been selected as one of 41 finalists in the prestigious National Photographic Portrait Prize 2018, for her work, ‘The Capability’, which brings attention to the creation of the National Facial Biometric Recognition Capability.

Anna discusses the background to her photograph and the inspiration for it:

“Through this work I am trying to bring attention to the creation of The Capability and the risks it poses to the privacy of every Australian that holds a driver’s licence or a passport. Despite what the Federal and state governments have said, the creation of this system that allows government agencies to identify people from a pool of images made up primarily of law-abiding citizens is extraordinary and I find it concerning how little consideration and weight has been given to the privacy implications of it.

Another important aspect of the work is how the creation of a national system of images, combined with facial recognition technology, significantly changes the function of a digital portrait. Portraits have long been objects that both represent and celebrate the uniqueness of individuals, and allow us to reflect on the human experience. With this technology a digital portrait becomes a simple tool by which government agencies can easily identify a person and obtain their biographical information, without their knowledge or consent.

The inspiration for this work came from my research into the broader national security changes that we have seen in the age of counter terrorism, which is feeding into a longer-term project. As part of that research I was in contact with Dr Monique Mann whose work provided a very useful grounding in the use and development of facial recognition technology in Australia. In August 2017, I also attended the Workshop on the Social Implications of National Security co-convened by Dr Mann where the privacy and social impacts of new surveillance technologies, big data and facial recognition technology were discussed and debated by some of the leading experts in the field. It often seems like there are few people watching and getting concerned with the changes that our governments are introducing in the name of national security, so it was really encouraging to be amongst a group of people that are committed to it.”

The National Photographic Portrait Prize is currently on display at the National Portrait Gallery in Canberra until 17 June 2018. The images of all of the finalists can be viewed here: https://nppp.portrait.gov.au/

Dr Monique Mann has recently published a co-authored book on Biometrics, Crime and Security in the Routledge Law, Science and Society Series and as part of her public policy work on this issue has also recently co-authored a submission to the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Intelligence and Security Review of the Identity-matching Services Bill 2018 and the Australian Passports Amendment (Identity-matching Services) Bill 2018 that provides the legislative basis for The Capability.

 

 

CJRC Member gives evidence to Parliamentary Inquiry on law enforcement and new technology



On Thursday the 29th of March Crime and Justice Research Centre member Dr Monique Mann gave oral evidence to the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Law Enforcement Inquiry into new information communication technologies and the challenges facing law enforcement.

This evidence was based on Dr Mann’s published works in online surveillance, extraterritorial online policing including darkweb policing, biometrics including facial recognition and her ongoing research on 3D printed firearms, big data and algorithmic policing.

The opening statement that Dr Mann gave focused on her public policy and advocacy work in defending encryption and can be accessed here, with the full written submission available here.

QUT’s Graduate Certificate on Domestic Violence featured on ABC Focus

ABC Focus will run an episode on domestic violence education in Australia on 27 March 2018 at 12:00pm QLD time. The episode features JS12 Queensland University of Technology’s Graduate Certificate in Domestic Violence and JSB286 Queensland University of Technology’s interdisciplinary undergraduate elective Domestic Violence.

Listen to the episode here 

Links to resources from the episode can be found here.

QUT’s Graduate Certificate in Domestic Violence in the news

The Sydney Morning Herald ran a story about graduate education about domestic violence in Australia. A new weapon in the fight against family violence by Jane Gilmore was published 20 March 2018. The article features quotes from QUT’s Graduate Certificate in Domestic Violence alumni. For more information about the units in the Graduate Certificate in Domestic Violence click here.

Recently published: 2nd edition of the Routledge Handbook of Critical Criminology

The 2nd edition of the Routledge Handbook of Critical Criminology, edited by CJRC Adjunct Professor Walter S. DeKeseredy and CJRC Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz was published on 17 March 2018. The updated edition includes forty chapters and more than a dozen contributions by CJRC staff and adjunct professors such as:

Left realism: a new look (Walter S. DeKeseredy and Martin D. Schwartz)
Southern criminology (Kerry Carrington, Russell Hogg, and Maximo Sozzo)
Masculinities and Crime (James W. Messerschmidt and Stephen Tomsen)
Queer criminology (Carrie Buist, Emily Lenning, and Matthew Ball)
Critical Green criminology (Rob White)
Green cultural criminology (Avi Brisman and Nigel South)
Towards a Criminology of War, Violence and Militarism (Ross McGarry and Sandra Walklate)
Terrorism. The Problem with Radicalization: Overlooking the elephants in the room (Sandra Walklate and Gaybe Mythen)
Thinking critically about contemporary adult pornography and woman abuse (Walter S. DeKeseredy and Amanda Hall-Sanchez)
Antifeminism and backlash: a critical criminological imperative (Molly Dragiewicz)
A critical examination of girls’ violence and juvenile justice (Meda Chesney-Lind and Lisa Pasko)
The future of a critical rural criminology (Joseph F. Donnermeyer)
Violence and social policy (Elliott Currie)
Confronting adult pornography (Walter DeKeseredy)

An Author meets critics session will be held at the American Society of Criminology meetings in Atlanta, Georgia in November 2018.

Associate Professor Michael Flood features on Radio National Life Matters: Changing Behaviours around Sexual Consent

CJRC member, Associate Professor Michael Flood, spoke with Radio National Life Matters program this morning on the topic of Changing Behaviours around Sexual Consent.

The movement for change generated by #metoo and the allegations of sexual assault at Australian universities has brought sexual consent into sharp focus.

How do we re-educate and change behaviour so both parties are respected and fully agree to what goes on between them sexually?

Researcher on men, masculinities, gender and violence prevention, Associate Professor Michael Flood of QUT and Mary Barry, CEO of Our Watch, who run the online campaign targetted at 12-20 year olds called The Line, discuss consent and offer some solutions.

You can listen to Michael’s interview, and the full story here

Coercive Control Workshop and Celebration of Books

Coercive Control Workshop 

The concept of ‘Coercive Control’ as a means of making sense of the nature and extent of violence(s) in women’s everyday lives has been around since the early 1980s. However its recent revitalisation by Evan Stark has resulted in rejuvenated interest in it in the policy domain. In England and Wales an offence of coercive control was introduced in December 2015 and a recent special edition of Criminology and Criminal Justice exposes this concept and associated legal and professional practices to international interrogation. The purpose of this workshop is to examine the efficacy of the implementation of this recent legislation alongside subjecting this concept to further critical interrogation with a view to examining its potential value for other jurisdictions.

Please join the Crime and Justice Research Centre and the School of Justice for a workshop on ‘Coercive Control’, with leading practitioners and academics. Following the event, there will be a Celebration of Books recently published by Crime and Justice Research Centre members.

March 15, 2018

3.00 – 5.00pm
Including light refreshments
OJW Room, Level 12, S Block, QUT Gardens Point Campus

This event requires registration.  To register, please email Brigid Xavier – brigid.xavier@qut.edu.au.  Eventbrite link to follow. 

Speakers

Kate Fitz-Gibbon
Senior Lecturer in Criminology at Monash University.

Sandra Walklate
Eleanor Rathbone Chair of Sociology at the University of Liverpool (U.K)

Rachel Neil

Principal Solicitor of the Women’s Legal Service (WLS)

 

Publication: “Sleeping the deep, deep sleep – the Hierarchy of Disaster” – Dr. Dean Biron

School of Justice affiliated academic Dr Dean Biron has published a new essay titled “Sleeping the deep, deep sleep.” Co-written with Dr Suzie Gibson of Charles Sturt University, the piece appears in Issue 229 of Overland Literary Journal:

https://overland.org.au/previous-issues/issue-229/essay-dean-biron-and-suzie-gibson/

Subtitled “The Hierarchy of Disaster,” the essay considers how human-made catastrophes are ordered so as to distinguish between worthy and unworthy victims. Commencing with a comparison of political and media responses to the 2001 terrorist attacks in the US and the 1984 Bhopal tragedy in India, the essay considers how many traumatic occurrences are elided from the collective memory and justice is denied to those victims of disasters which occur beyond the “self-reverent gaze” of Western society. It concludes by suggesting that the starting point to diminishing this hierarchy, and in turn confronting the ubiquity of disaster itself, must be an ethical recalibration on the part of first world governments.

In recent months Dean has also published work in The Guardian, The Conversation, Popular Music and Society and Metro Screen Journal.

Dean is currently coordinating the QUT Justice undergraduate subject ‘Deviance.’

In the media: “They are calculating: What makes women kill their partners”

 

Congratulations to QUT School of Justice sessional academic Dr Belinda Parker, who appeared in news.com.au discussing her thesis “Seven Deadly Sins – developing a situational understanding of homicide event motive”  – the seven motives that characterize solved homocides, based on the analysis of 149 Australian murders.

Read the full article here:

http://www.news.com.au/national/crime/they-are-calculating-what-makes-women-kill-their-partners/news-story/e5e6a97cc432c0f79363917471b78791#.2fvlp

Belinda’s PhD was supervised by Professor John Scott and Dr Claire Ferguson from QUT School of Justice.