Domestic violence and technology: Findings and future pathways

Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz and Dr Bridget Harris will present findings from the ACCAN funded study Domestic violence and communication technology: Victim experiences of intrusion, surveillance, and identity theft. This free public seminar will present key findings from the report on survivor experiences of technology-facilitated coercive control.

26 June, 2019
4:00 pm-5:30 pm
Room P419, Level 4, P Block, Gardens Point Campus

Download the report and infographics here

Information about the research team, future presentations, and publications is here.

Ask LOIS webinar on Domestic violence and communication technology

Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz and Dr Bridget Harris will present an Ask LOIS webinar on Domestic violence and communication technology
20 June, 2019
11:00 am-11:30 am
Register here https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/974592111259198209

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Domestic violence and communication technology: Insights from Australian survivors

Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz will present Domestic violence and communication technology: Insights from Australian survivors at the Queensland Domestic and Family Violence Prevention Month Breakfast hosted by Cairns Regional Domestic Violence Service in Cairns, Australia. This is the first presentation of the findings from the ACCAN funded study Domestic violence and communication technology: Victim experiences of intrusion, surveillance, and identity theft.

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The Australian Law Reform Commission Report on the Family Law System: Implications for Domestic Violence

The Australian Law Reform Commission Report on the Family Law System: Implications for Domestic Violence

The Australian Law Reform Commission (ALRC) Review of the Family Law System is the first comprehensive review of Australia’s family law system since its commencement more than 40 years ago.The ALRC Report on the Review of the Family Law System findings and recommendations have serious implications for domestic violence, and women and children will be deeply affected by how they are implemented. Please join us for an interactive discussion and networking luncheon to consider the report and recommendations for domestic violence cases as part of Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

This is a partnership event between Brisbane Domestic Violence Service and QUT Law. Read more

Migrant women and technology-facilitated domestic abuse 

Shaping violence prevention practice and policy

Associate Professor Michael Flood gave three presentations, two as keynote speaker, on violence prevention practice and policy in November and December 2018.

Dr Flood provided a keynote address to the Connexions 15th Annual Domestic Violence Conference (Central Coast, NSW, November 26), titled “Engaging men in the prevention of men’s violence against women: How to get men in the door, inspire and mobilise them, and reduce resistance.” He contributed to a panel discussion on the role of men in ending violence against women at Griffith University’s conference, #Be someone who does something: MATE Conference (Gold Coast, November 28-29).

Michael also provided a keynote address to one of the major annual domestic violence conferences in Australia, STOP Domestic Violence Conference Australia (Gold Coast, December 3-5). His presentation was titled “Mobilising men to build gender justice: Strategies for effective movement-building”. Michael explored an important but under-utilised strategy for preventing domestic and sexual violence, community mobilisation. He assessed existing initiatives to mobilise men as violence prevention advocates and outlined the elements of effective community mobilising.

Dr Flood also gave further presentations to audiences of policy makers, including presentations to the Department of Child Safety, Youth and Women (Brisbane), the Domestic and Family Violence Community of Practice in the Department of Home Affairs (Canberra), and the Office for Women (Canberra).

Domestic Violence Beyond the Obvious: Interpreting Power, Control and Manipulation

Domestic Violence Beyond the Obvious: Interpreting Power, Control and Manipulation

Fulbright Specialist Mark Wynn

8 October 2018
1 – 5 pm
Room-Three-Sixty, Level 10, Y Block, QUT Gardens Point Campus

Free registration required

Please join the QUT School of Justice for a special domestic violence event with Fulbright specialist Mark Wynn. This interactive training will enable participants to see domestic violence offender manipulation through the eyes of people who have experienced domestic violence, first responders, and advocates. This session will enhance participants’ understanding of the power, control, and manipulation tactics used by abusers, touching on probable cause, interpretation of injuries, justifiable self-defense and determining the dominant/primary aggressor.

The Fulbright Specialist Program supports Australian educational institutions through grants to bring U.S. Specialists in selected disciplines to Australia. The aim of the FSP grant is to assist Australian educational institutions to exchange expertise and build collaborative linkages with U.S. faculty and professionals on curriculum and faculty development, institutional planning and a variety of other activities.

Sponsored by:

Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz wins domestic violence prevention award

Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz won a 2018 Domestic Violence Prevention Leadership Award from the Domestic Violence Prevention Centre Gold Coast for Furthering the Work – adding new information and knowledge. Read more

Recently published: Technology facilitated coercive control: Domestic violence and the competing roles of digital media platforms

Molly Dragiewicz, Jean Burgess, Ariadna Matamoros-Fernández, Michael Salter, Nicolas P. Suzor, Delanie Woodlock & Bridget Harris recently published Technology facilitated coercive control: Domestic violence and the competing roles of digital media platforms. Feminist Media Studies, 18(4), 609–625. https://doi.org/10.1080/14680777.2018.1447341

This article is part of a special issue of Feminist Media Studies on Online Misogyny, edited by Debbie Ging and Eugenia Siapera. Read more

Publication: ‘A lightbulb moment’: Using the theory of planned behaviour to explore the challenges and opportunities for early engagement of Australian men who use violence in their relationships

 

 

 

 

 

CJRC member, Dr. Michael Flood has recently published an article in Journal of Interpersonal Violence.

 Forsdike, K., Tarzia, L., Flood, M., Vlais, R., and Hegarty, K. “‘A lightbulb moment’: Using the theory of planned behaviour to explore the challenges and opportunities for early engagement of Australian men who use violence in their relationships.” Journal of Interpersonal Violence, (2018). DOI: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0886260518780778

 Abstract: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a common complex social and public health problem. Interventions for IPV male perpetrators are an essential component of an early and effective response. Yet little is known about how to engage men in interventions for help-seeking. Using the theory of planned behavior (TPB), we explored men’s perceptions of seeking help for an unhealthy relationship and how they could be supported to recognize their behavior and undertake change at an early stage. We recruited 23 men who were currently attending a men’s behavior change program in Australia to take part in focus groups. These were recorded, transcribed, and thematically analyzed. The TPB concepts of behavioral beliefs, perceived control, and subjective norms were found throughout the data. Behavioral beliefs covered four subthemes: self-awareness, self-reflection and agency, the influence of others to change, and needing the right message in the right place. Perceived control was connected to these men’s understandings of what it means to be a man. Subjective norms were rarely raised, but there was some indication that men’s perceptions of societal norms about men as violent influenced a perceived lack of agency to change behavior. Our findings highlight the complexity of, and challenges in, engaging men who may use violence before they reach crisis point and justice intervenes. Despite this, participating men could find acceptable an appropriately developed and easy-to-access intervention that enhances recognition of behaviors and provides links to supports. Health professionals or researchers developing early interventions targeting these men need to take the engagement challenges into account.