Landmark Publication of Palgrave Handbook of Criminology and the Global South

Palgrave Handbook of Criminology and the Global South edited by Kerry Carrington, Russell Hogg, John Scott and Máximo Sozzo has just been published.

The first comprehensive collection of its kind, this handbook addresses the problem of knowledge production in criminology, redressing the global imbalance with an original focus on the Global South. Issues of vital criminological research and policy significance abound in the Global South, with important implications for South/North relations as well as global security and justice. In a world of high speed communication technologies and fluid national borders, empire building has shifted from colonising territories to colonising knowledge. The authors of this volume question whose voices, experiences, and theories are reflected in the discipline, and argue that diversity of discourse is more important now than ever before.     Approaching the subject from a range of historical, theoretical, and social perspectives, this collection promotes the Global South not only as a space for the production of knowledge, but crucially, as a source of innovative research and theory on crime and justice. Wide-ranging in scope and authoritative in theory, this study will appeal to scholars, activists, policy-makers, and students from a wide range of social science disciplines from both the Global North and South, including criminal justice, human rights, and penology.

For further details click here.

Here is what Emerita Professor Raewyn Connell has to say about this landmark collection:

“This Handbook embodies for criminology a revolutionary change that is influencing and challenging all the social sciences. This is work that prioritises the experience of colonized and postcolonial societies, and values the intellectual work done in the periphery. It does not abandon ideas and methods developed in the global North, but sets them in a different logic of knowledge-making. It calls their universality into question and combines them with very different agendas and perspectives. Once this process is set in motion, a vast terrain opens up.

While organized around the historical relations of colonization and post-colonial power, a Southern criminology does not produce simple categories. Both “North” and “South” name multiple and changing social formations. These complexities are well represented in this Handbook, ranging across affluent settler-colonial countries, poor developing countries, emerging economic powers, and the offshore transnational corporations that have increasingly replaced states as the centres of global capitalism.

Any Southern criminology must call into question familiar concepts and understandings. An important theme in this Handbook is the role of the state, conventionally seen as the source of law and embodiment of justice. Many of the contributions here recognize the pervasiveness of state violence and injustice in the making of global empire.

This Handbook has significance beyond its contribution to criminology and our understanding of the specifics of crime, policing and violence. It contributes to a major transformation of our knowledge of social processes in general. There are rich resources here, multiple points of view, a wealth of information and re-thinking. I hope their work travels widely into the world.’ (Raewyn Connell, University of Sydney, Australia)

For more reviews click here

ASSA grant success: ‘Technology and Domestic Violence: Experiences, Perpetration and Responses’ Workshop 2018

CJRC staff – Dr Bridget Harris and Professor Kerry Carrington, with Dr Delanie Woodlock and the Honourable Marcia Neave – have received funding from the Academy of Social Sciences Australia to host a workshop in August 2018, on ‘Technology and Domestic Violence: Experiences, Perpetration and Responses’ #DVTech18 #DVTech18QUT

Domestic violence is widely recognised as one of Australia’s most important social issues, with approximately one woman killed by her partner, weekly. This event will bring focus to an emerging trend in domestic violence: the use of technology to stalk and abuse victim/survivors. Landmark studies have been conducted in Australia that have highlighted the significant impacts on wellbeing and risks to safety associated with this violence, but as yet there is no consensus in regards to the definitions, effects, legal and judicial remedies and social responses. By bringing together 20 leading scholars, practitioners and technology experts from across the nation, this workshop will produce knowledge that will improve policy and practice in protecting and empowering victims, with the ultimate aim of preventing this under-recognised violence from occurring.

The workshop will also be supported by the Crime and Justice Research Centre and will be held in August 2018; for more on the event, outcomes and research conducted by QUT scholars in this field, contact

Discovery and DECRA success for the Crime and Justice Research Centre

We are delighted to announce the following successful ARC DECRA and DISCOVERY  successes.

Dr Angela Higginson has been awarded a Discovery Early Career Researcher Award (DECRA) entitled,  Ethnically Motivated Youth Hate Crime in Australia

Total Funding Amount: $344,996 over three years
Proposal Summary:
This project aims to provide the first assessment of youth hate crime in Australia, examine incidence rates over time, and explore how Australia’s experiences compare internationally. Hate crime can cause injury, psychological harm and social disengagement. For victims in early adolescence – a critical time of identity formation – the harms may be multiplied. The project will uncover the risk and protective factors for perpetration and victimisation, and for understanding the consequences for hate crime victims. This is expected to benefit the community by helping to inform social policy to improve the lives of Australia’s youth.

Out of 197 successful DECRA, only 2 were awarded in the 1602 Criminology FOR code

Professor Kerry Carrington is the successful recipient of a Discovery grant entitled, Preventing gendered violence: lessons from the global south

Total Funding Amount: $228,951 over three years

Projects Summary:
Preventing gendered violence: lessons from the global south. This project aims to study the establishment of police stations for women in Argentina as a key element to preventing gendered violence. This project aims to discover the extent to which the Argentinian interventions prevent the occurrence of gendered violence, and identify aspects that could inform the development of new approaches to preventing gendered violence in Australia. Anticipated outcomes include knowledge critical to developing and implementing new ways to prevent gendered violence, with long-term benefits for national health, wellbeing and productivity.

Out of 594 successful Discovery Projects, only four were awarded in the 1602 Criminology FOR code

Crime and Justice Research Centre staff headed to American Society of Criminology conference

Crime and Justice Research Centre staff members are headed to American Society of Criminology conference in Philadelphia, PA 14-18 November 2017. Read more

EVENT TONIGHT – “Equality in the Criminal System” Featuring CJRC Researcher Professor Kerry Carrington

Tonight the Australian Fabians are hosting an event in Brisbane at QUT Gardens Point Campus on ‘Equality in the Criminal System’.

This event will feature presentations by CJRC researcher Professor Kerry Carrington and Luke Thomson from the Inala Youth Service.

For more information about this event and to register, click here.


A knowledge network for the global south

The Queensland University of Technology’s Faculty of Law is hosting academics from Australia and Argentina to build knowledge networks between the two nations.

Despite sharing significant commonalities and facing a number of similar challenges, the links between Australia and Argentina, particularly where the exchange of knowledge is concerned, have been underdeveloped. Read more

“Heads held high” – Amnesty International Report on Indigenous young people in Detention in Queensland

Heads held highAmnesty International has recently published a research report highlighting extensive concerns and systemic issues regarding the mistreatment and over-representation of Indigenous young people in detention in Queensland. Read more