Policing in the South Pacific: University of the South Pacific

 

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Image 1:  John Scott with members of the USP Policing Program, Danielle Watson and Casandra Harry

Image 2:  Vice Chancellor of the University of the South Pacific, Professor Rajesh Chandra

CJRC member and Acting Head of School of Justice at QUT, Professor John Scott, recently visited the University of the South Pacific’s main Fiji campus where he engaged with staff in the School of Social Sciences about a number of ongoing initiatives in the space of southern criminology. In particular, QUT staff, and staff of the Pacific Policing Program, USP, are collaborating on projects  looking at policing in the Pacific, and the ecology of crime in island communities.

The Discipline Coordinator of the USP Policing program, Dr Danielle Watson is an Adjunct with the School of Justice

 

 

 

 

 

CJRC Seminar Series: Eddie, Smoke and Mirrors – Adjunct Professor Scott Poynting

Crime and Justice Research Centre Seminar Series with speaker Adjunct Professor Scott Poynting

Topic: Eddie, Smoke and Mirrors

Date: Thursday 12 April 2018
When: 4.00pm – 5.30pm
Venue: C Block, level 4, room C412,
QUT Gardens Point Campus,
2 George Street, Brisbane

Register: by Friday 6 April 2018
by emailing law.research@qut.edu.au.

Abstract:
This paper draws inspiration from Frank Pearce’s insistence, over forty years ago in his Crimes of the Powerful, that ‘It is not possible to explain … systematic continuous [corrupt] behaviour in terms of the “greed” of a few individuals’ and that anti-corruption prosecutions ‘by condemning an infraction as illegal and abnormal serve ‘to dramatise an imaginary social order’. It presents a case study of corruption investigations and proceedings involving ‘disgraced’ former New South Wales upper house ‘numbers man’ of the Labor party, Eddie Obeid, currently serving a prison sentence for wilful misconduct in public office.
While justice will be seen to be done in this case and the process is clearly justifiable, the crimes of Obeid and his cohort are small change compared to large-scale corporate corruption. The Obeid family is not General Electric or Westinghouse. Why, then, the public theatre? What function does it serve? This paper argues that such charades act out the fantasy that the normal workings of capitalism are uncorrupted, and that abnormal aberrations can be rooted out, to the public benefit. The earlier cartels and anti-competitive price-fixing of monopoly capitalism shown by Pearce to be endemic, are now supplemented by newer corporate criminal opportunities under neo-liberalism. In the focus on the lining of private pockets, our view is averted from the larger damage to public wellbeing of privatisation, contracting out of public resources, and depredation of the environment for short-term private profit.

@CrimeJusticeQUT

Adjunct Professor Scott Poynting
Scott Poynting is an adjunct professor in the School of Justice at QUT. He was founding professor in criminology at the University of Auckland (2013-16) and was previously Professor in Sociology at Manchester Metropolitan University. He is author of 99 journal articles and scholarly chapters, and co-author or co-editor of a dozen books, the most recent of which is Media, Crime and Racism, just published by Palgrave. He co-edited, with David Whyte, the December 2017 special issue of the International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy, on ‘Corruption Downunder’.

Recently published: 2nd edition of the Routledge Handbook of Critical Criminology

The 2nd edition of the Routledge Handbook of Critical Criminology, edited by CJRC Adjunct Professor Walter S. DeKeseredy and CJRC Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz was published on 17 March 2018. The updated edition includes forty chapters and more than a dozen contributions by CJRC staff and adjunct professors such as:

Left realism: a new look (Walter S. DeKeseredy and Martin D. Schwartz)
Southern criminology (Kerry Carrington, Russell Hogg, and Maximo Sozzo)
Masculinities and Crime (James W. Messerschmidt and Stephen Tomsen)
Queer criminology (Carrie Buist, Emily Lenning, and Matthew Ball)
Critical Green criminology (Rob White)
Green cultural criminology (Avi Brisman and Nigel South)
Towards a Criminology of War, Violence and Militarism (Ross McGarry and Sandra Walklate)
Terrorism. The Problem with Radicalization: Overlooking the elephants in the room (Sandra Walklate and Gaybe Mythen)
Thinking critically about contemporary adult pornography and woman abuse (Walter S. DeKeseredy and Amanda Hall-Sanchez)
Antifeminism and backlash: a critical criminological imperative (Molly Dragiewicz)
A critical examination of girls’ violence and juvenile justice (Meda Chesney-Lind and Lisa Pasko)
The future of a critical rural criminology (Joseph F. Donnermeyer)
Violence and social policy (Elliott Currie)
Confronting adult pornography (Walter DeKeseredy)

An Author meets critics session will be held at the American Society of Criminology meetings in Atlanta, Georgia in November 2018.

#CJRC staff and adjuncts win awards at the American Society of Criminology

Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz, from the CJRC, and her two co-authors Professors Walter Dekeseredy and Marty Schwartz were awarded the best book prize by the Victimology Division of the American Society of Criminology , 2017.

In another prize ceremony Professor Rob White from University of Tasmania, and adjunct professor with the CJRC, QUT won the Lifetime Achievement Award, Division of Critical Criminology, ASC, 2017. Rob was also recognised for his global contribution to criminology, by the International Division of the ASC.

Professor Marty Schwartz with Professor Rob White

Recently Published: “Transparency and ‘uncomfortable knowledge’ in child protection”

                             

CJRC Adjunct Professor Judith Bessant from the School of Global, Urban and Social Studies at RMIT has recently co-authored an article published in Volume 37, Issue 2 of the Policy Studies journal. Read more

In the News: Professor John Scott & Adjunct Professor Victor Minichiello Discussing Male Sex Work

John & Victor_2015

Professor John Scott and CJRC Adjunct Professor Victor Minichiello have recently been featured in an article on The Age website discussing male sex workers. The article “Male sex workers call for respect, understanding” details the extensive discrimination and stigma that male sex workers are continuously subject to as a result of various myths and stereotypes about such work, along with strict legislative regulations. Read more

CJRC Adjunct Associate Professor John Mickel in the Media

Party Games - John Mickel + Graham Young

CJRC Adjunct Associate Professor and Former Queensland Parliament Speaker, John Mickel, spoke to ABC Radio today about current issues in State politics.

He also briefly touches on his involvement with the Graduate Certificate in Policy and Governance offered through the School of Justice at QUT.

To listen to the podcast, click here.

Recently published: Violence against Women in Pornography

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Adjunct Professor Walter DeKeseredy recently published Violence against Women in Pornography with co-author Marilyn Corsianos Read more