Domestic violence and technology: Findings and future pathways

Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz and Dr Bridget Harris will present findings from the ACCAN funded study Domestic violence and communication technology: Victim experiences of intrusion, surveillance, and identity theft. This free public seminar will present key findings from the report on survivor experiences of technology-facilitated coercive control.

26 June, 2019
4:00 pm-5:30 pm
Room P419, Level 4, P Block, Gardens Point Campus

Download the report and infographics here

Information about the research team, future presentations, and publications is here.

Event: Fixing Fitzgerald – Queensland’s failed sex industry policy

Please join the QUT School of Justice, Respect Inc and #DecrimQLD, for a special event to mark the 30th anniversary of the handing down of the Fitzgerald Inquiry Report in 1989. The event brings together six leading academic and industry experts to discuss sex industry law reform in Queensland.

3 July 2019

5.30pm for a 6.00pm to 8.00pm presentation
Gibson Room, Level 10, Z Block, QUT Gardens Point

Register here

Abstract

The 1989 Fitzgerald Inquiry found excessive levels of police corruption in relation to sex work, recommending significant reforms and civil regulation to remove police from a regulatory role. Yet in 2019, thirty years from the date the Fitzgerald report was tabled in parliament, these reforms remain unfinished business.
Despite the findings of the Fitzgerald Inquiry, sex workers are still monitored by police today. At least 80% of the sex industry remain under police regulation and are controlled by legislation including the Prostitution Act 1999 (Qld) and the Criminal Code 1899 (Qld). The legislation criminalises sex workers working in pairs and massage parlours. Police powers including immunity when undercover have been extended, and police enforce advertising wording compliance. Is this efficient use of police resources? Is it possible for police to be both prosecutors and protectors? What can be done to improve the safety and health of sex workers in Queensland?

Chairs

Jules Kim
Korean/Australian sex worker and CEO
Scarlet Alliance, Australian Sex Workers Association


Mark Lauchs
Associate Professor
QUT School of Justice

Speakers

Candi Forrest – A Brisbane local and prominent commentator on sex work policy who lives to tell the pre and post-Fitzgerald tale. Founding member of Respect Inc. and member of the Sexual Health Ministerial Advisory Committee.

Dr Lisa Fitzgerald – A public health sociologist at the School of Public Health, University of Queensland who has lead research projects on the impact of decriminalisation on the health and safety of sex workers in New Zealand and authored, ‘Taking the Crime out of Sex Work’ (2010).

Elyse Coles – A sex worker with insight into the Fitzgerald times and current regulation whose passion is equity for sex workers, particularly trans sex workers. Spokesperson for the DecrimQLD Campaign.

Dr Katie Hail-Jares – Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Griffith Criminology Institute and editor of Challenging Perspectives on Street-Based Sex Work (Temple University Press).

Vickki Boon – Speaker from the Respect Inc. Asian Focus Peer Education Project on current policing approaches to Asian & migrant sex workers in Queensland.

Dr Erin O’Brien – Senior Lecturer in the QUT School of Justice researching policy and advocacy surrounding sex work, human trafficking and migration and author of The Politics of Sex Trafficking (Palgrave 2013) and Challenging the Human Trafficking Narrative (Routledge 2019).

 

Domestic violence and communication technology: Insights from Australian survivors

Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz will present Domestic violence and communication technology: Insights from Australian survivors at the Queensland Domestic and Family Violence Prevention Month Breakfast hosted by Cairns Regional Domestic Violence Service in Cairns, Australia. This is the first presentation of the findings from the ACCAN funded study Domestic violence and communication technology: Victim experiences of intrusion, surveillance, and identity theft.

Read more

Australia Brazil exchange on preventing family violence

The Australian Embassy in Brazil is funding an exchange of family violence experts.

The first phase of the project, taking place in June 2019, involves five leading gender and family violence prevention scholars traveling to Brazil to engage in a program of visits to family violence and criminal justice agencies. The  Australian experts will also partake in a series of academic and public forums and presentations with Brazilian experts.

The second phase of the exchange will involve more than a dozen Brazilian expert practitioners and academics traveling to Australia to engage in a similar program of activities. One of the Victorian Andrews government’s defining policy contributions and investments ($2.7 b) has been towards ending family violence.

In the wake of the landmark Victorian Royal Commission into Family Violence (2016), Australia is a world leader in preventing family violence. A

The Monash Gender and Family Violence Prevention Centre is a key partner and participant in the exchange. The Australian experts attending the Brazilian exchange also include Professor Kerry Carrington from QUT School of Justice who has been researching the prevention of gender violence and women’s police stations in Argentina – https://research.qut.edu.au/pgv/

The five leading gender and family violence prevention scholars traveling to Brazil in June include, (pictured below from L to R)

Professor Kerry Carrington (QUT), Dr Lisa Harris (RMIT),
Professor Jude McCulloch (Monash Gender and Family Violence Prevention Centre),
Dr Jasmine McGowan (Monash Gender and Family Violence Prevention Centre), Dr Heather Nancorrow (CEO, ANROWS)

 

 

Media: Women’s Only Police Stations

QUT Media have issued a press release following a Channel 7 News report on Friday 3 May 2019 about QUT School of Justice Head of School Professor Kerry Carrington’s research into women’s only police stations in Argentina and their applicability to Australia.

Kerry has recently returned from the UN 63rd Commission on the Status of Women NGO Sessions in New York where she addressed the meeting of 80-100 NGO delegates from around the world on her extensive research on women’s police stations in Argentina and others’ research from Brazil and other South American countries.

Professor Carrington called on other UN members to recognise the women’s police stations’ success in preventing gender violence, and promote the establishment of stand-alone women’s police stations to eliminate violence against women.

See the media release here:  https://www.qut.edu.au/news?id=143668

And watch the 7News report here: https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=357336771580330

 

The Australian Law Reform Commission Report on the Family Law System: Implications for Domestic Violence

The Australian Law Reform Commission Report on the Family Law System: Implications for Domestic Violence

The Australian Law Reform Commission (ALRC) Review of the Family Law System is the first comprehensive review of Australia’s family law system since its commencement more than 40 years ago.The ALRC Report on the Review of the Family Law System findings and recommendations have serious implications for domestic violence, and women and children will be deeply affected by how they are implemented. Please join us for an interactive discussion and networking luncheon to consider the report and recommendations for domestic violence cases as part of Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

This is a partnership event between Brisbane Domestic Violence Service and QUT Law. Read more

Report of Parliamentary Joint Committee on Law Enforcement (PJCLE) Inquiry into the Impact of New and Emerging Information and Communication Technology

Dr Monique Mann

Crime Justice and Social Democracy Research Centre member Dr Monique Mann, along with colleagues from Deakin University (Dr Ian Warren and Dr Adam Molnar) and the Chinese University of Hong Kong (Dr Angela Daly) have been extensively cited in the final report of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Joint Committee on Law Enforcement (PJCLE) Inquiry into the Impact of New and Emerging Information and Communication Technology.

Their joint programme of research in surveillance and cybercrime (including transnational online policing, darkweb policing, Mutual Legal Assistance Treaties, big data policing, encryption policy, biometrics, and 3D printed firearms) was cited twenty-nine times in the report.

Their research is highly critical of the human rights implications of new technologies in policing, and it clearly shaped the report, directly influencing the recommendations handed down by the PCJLE, which can be found here: https://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/download/publications/tabledpapers/02593c55-f6db-4432-85c7-e0ba89b0e21b/upload_pdf/PJCLE_Impact%20of%20emerging%20info%20and%20comms%20tech_April%202019.pdf;fileType=application%2Fpdf#search=%22publications/tabledpapers

Drs Mann and Molnar appeared before the committee to give oral evidence in March 2018, and their opening statement to the Parliamentary Joint Committee can be found here: https://privacy.org.au/2018/03/30/statement-to-the-parliamentary-joint-committee-on-law-enforcement/

Their original full submission provided to the Inquiry, representing all digital rights civil society organisations in Australia, can be found here: https://eprints.qut.edu.au/116090/

Reflections on Women, Men, Sexual Violence, and #MeToo

Qld Police Commissioner Ian Stewart, Centre Director Prof. Melissa Bull, Prof. James Messerschmidt, Belinda Cox, Assoc. Prof. Michael Flood

The #MeToo movement has drawn national and global attention to the problems of sexual harassment and abuse. A recent, popular public event at the Queensland University of Technology explored the #MeToo campaign, how women and men have responded to it, and the roles that men can play in building a community free of sexual violence and abuse.

The public event, titled “Reflections on Women, Men, Sexual Violence, and #MeToo”, examined the promise and pitfalls of current efforts to end sexual violence, and the role of men in sexual violence prevention. The buzz of conversation during and after the event was a clear sign that it had prompted thought and reflection.

Two leading international experts presented to the 90 or so researchers, professionals, and community members in attendance. James W. Messerschmidt is a Distinguished University Professor of Sociology at the University of Southern Maine, USA, author of the recent book Hegemonic Masculinity, and an Adjunct Professor at QUT’s School of Justice, and the event was timed to take advantage of his visit to QUT. Dr Michael Flood is an Associate Professor at QUT and author of Engaging Men and Boys in Violence Prevention. The event was chaired by Belinda Cox, a longstanding domestic violence advocate.

Attendees at the event included Police Commissioner Ian Stewart, Deputy Commissioner Michael Wassing of the Queensland Fire and Emergency Services, Professor Belinda Carpenter, Assistance Dean (Research) in the QUT Faculty of Law, and a host of others.

There was lively discussion after Messerschmidt’s and Flood’s presentations. Some participants took up Messerschmidt’s assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of the #MeToo campaign. They asked: does #MeToo include the experiences of women beyond the white, wealthy Hollywood celebrities on whom the media has focused? Will the campaign lead to real social change? Other participants asked about the challenges of engaging men in positive change. What role can fathers play in encouraging non-violent futures for their sons and daughters? How do we make sure that women’s voices continue to be heard? And, above all, how can we encourage well-meaning men to take part in working for change?

Book Launch: Challenging the Human Trafficking Narrative: Victims, Villians and Heroes

Challenging the Human Trafficking Narrative : Victims, Villains and Heroes by CJSDRC member, Dr Erin O’Brien was launched last night at Avid Bookstore West End, by Professor Kerry Carrington. It was a full house attended by a large audience.

The book is published in a Routledge book series Victims, Culture and Society co-edited by her and Professor Sandra Walklate, from University of Liverpool

Concerns about victimisation, as well as the politics of victimisation, have multiplied over the last 50 years. The book series Victims, Culture and Society explores the major concepts, debates and controversies that this concern has generated. As the impact of globalisation, the movement of peoples, the divergences between the global north and the global south have become ever more apparent, this series provides an authoritative space for original contributions in making sense of these far reaching social, political and cultural changes. These issues by their very nature demand an interdisciplinary approach outside conventional conceptual boundaries. Victims, Culture and Society offers the space for that voice. Erin’s book – which draws upon a range of interdisciplinary insights, from political theory, feminism, criminology and sociology, is therefore an ideal fit for the series. In it Erin deconstructs the familiar story of an Ideal victim of human trafficking, A foreign villain and a Western Hero, and interrogates the discourses and assumptions embedded in this over-simplified and caricatured narrative by turning it on its head. Why do dominant victim narratives construct a hierarchy between ideal and undeserving victims? Why do these narratives construct victims as hapless with no agency? Why are some victims narratives more prominent than others?
Why are the villains always foreign, ’undesirable others’ Johns, or pimps from gangs or organised crime?
What’s the role of the consumers in the sex industry? Are they villains or heros?
And why are the heros in dominant narratives about human trafficking nearly always white anti-trafficking activists and govts from the global north?

Erin’s book provides a beautifully crafted and engaging response to these questions.

Further information about the book can be found here:

https://www.routledge.com/Challenging-the-Human-Trafficking-Narrative-Victims-Villains-and-Heroes/OBrien/p/book/9781138858978

 

 

 

Webinar: Using App-Based and Sensing Methods for Social Science Research

Last week, CJSDRC researcher Dr Michael Chataway, and Dr Reka Solymosi from the University of Manchester presented a webinar on app based and sensing methods for social science research.

The webinar, co-hosted by the UK Data Service and Methods@Manchester was designed to discuss the use of mobile apps and sensing technologies in the social sciences, with a particular focus on measuring context-dependent fear of crime. The webinar was attended by over 70 individuals from academic, private, and public sectors.

The webinar and PowerPoint slides can be accessed here: https://www.ukdataservice.ac.uk/news-and-events/eventsitem/?id=5461

Researcher Bio’s:

Reka Solymosi is a lecturer in quantitative methods focused on making use of new forms of data to gain insight into people’s behaviour and subjective experiences, particularly focusing on crime, transport, and spatial research. She is also interested in promoting data literacy.

Michael Chataway is a lecturer at the School of Justice, Queensland University of Technology. His research focuses on measuring and responding to fear of crime using mobile technologies. Michael’s other research interests include social geography, environmental psychology, and digital methods.