An Unforgettable Exchange in Exeter

Jasmine B. Bachelor of Journalism / Bachelor of Laws (Honours)
University of Exeter, England (Semester 1, 2016)

It feels incredibly surreal now, thinking back to my semester spent abroad in England. Ever since I had heard about the unique opportunity to study on exchange, I knew it was something I had to be a part of. I’m pleased to report that the experience was even more remarkable then I had imagined. Between the international friendships made, exploring European cities, and getting to be a part of another culture, there really wasn’t a dull moment!

Host University: The University of Exeter

Above: Reed Hall, on the University of Exeter campus

University Campus

I spent my semester abroad in the Southeast of England, in the picturesque county of Devon. I studied at the University of Exeter (where J.K. Rowling graduated from, for the Harry Potter fans), using my electives from my Law degree to experience a range of disciplines, including: Philosophy, Sociology, Politics and Law. It gave me a great taste of their teaching methods, as well as enabling me to engage with a range of students. The campus itself is beautiful, built on the top of a hill overlooking the city of Exeter. It’s size and student intake is significantly lesser in size to QUT, which was fun to experience, as you often find yourself running into familiar faces around campus. The university hosts a combination of modern and heritage buildings, which cover a lot of great facilities including: student medical centre, pub, sporting halls, eateries, libraries and even a theatre.

Accommodation

 

James Owen Court University Residences

I undertook my exchange in the second semester of their academic year, which meant there were only a limited number of campus-run accommodation on offer. However, those planning on studying here in the first semester would have a larger choice of accommodation options (including catered, self-catered, ensuite and studio). My accommodation, as pictured above, was at ‘James Owen Court’ which was a 20-minute walk from the main campus and was located in the centre of the city. The location worked out perfectly, as I only spent two days at the University, so the other days I could spend enjoying cream teas and shopping in the city! It was a self-catered facility, where I shared a kitchen between seven other roommates. The rooms were ensuite, and a laundromat was available on the premises.

It was my first time living out of home, but I thoroughly enjoyed the experience and the independence. I arrived in Exeter alone, but met a huge group of international students along the way, who all quickly grew to be close friends.

International Students Group

Exeter Cathedral Square

Host Country: England (Exeter) The cost of living in England is quite high, especially if you’re living in bigger cities such as London. However, Exeter was quite affordable, and there were a range of places to eat and shop at a more affordable price (I would strongly recommend the local hangout, ‘The Old Firehouse’ which apparently inspired the Leaky Cauldron from the Harry Potter series). When it comes to travelling, there’s some great ways to get around Europe on a budget. One weekend I flew with a friend to Dublin for the low cost of 8 pounds (approximately $16 dollars). So, if researched right, travelling can be very inexpensive! I even secured a paid internship whilst living in Exeter, which helped offset some of the costs and gave me an even better insight into the city and the locals. The great thing about England is that you speak the same language, and hold a lot of the same cultural views, so there really isn’t any culture shock to be experienced – apart from the constant rain, that is!

All in all, exchange was an unforgettable experience, and there wasn’t a single moment I didn’t enjoy. Exchange presents an incredible opportunity to challenge yourself, step out of your comfort zone and develop your independence and awareness of different cultures.

A few extra snaps from my travels in Europe:

Copenhagen, Denmark

Cinque Terre, Italy

Paris, France

Happiest Time of My Life

Jade P., Bachelor of Business / Bachelor of Laws (Honours)
University of Strathclyde, Scotland (Semester 1, 2016)

What a task – asking me to reflect on my exchange experience in less than one page, where to even begin?

Semester 1, 2016 was the happiest six months of my life.

I did my exchange at the University of Strathclyde in the oh-so-sunny Glasgow, Scotland. That was typed with the heaviest sarcastic tone FYI, I think I had about seven days’ worth of sun during my time in Glasgow – I even had to go out and buy a lighter foundation!

I lived on the top floor of the second-cheapest accommodation option, with seven other girls. For six of which, English was their second language, so anytime the American girl or I noticed a mistake in their English, we had to write it out on ‘the fridge’ (cue: dun-dun-duuun). After 4 and a half months the fridge was filled with the most hilarious out of context sentences and embarrassingly enough even something I had said managed to make it there. In my defence, Australian English okay! And that’s another thing I had to learn, to make fun of the country that I’m so proud to call home. I don’t know why, but Europeans don’t quite consider us a real country yet; you should have heard the sassy comments on the night of Eurovision! I’ve heard it all from riding kangaroos to buying my groceries with monopoly money – people will laugh at us and our “what is a bogan?” accent, but at the end of the day you will be their favourite international drinking bud – take it all in pride.

I am so relieved to report that I did not have any Scottish teachers, except for one guest law lecturer, and yes – I did not understand a single word he said. We call ourselves multicultural; wait until you go to school in Europe. I’ve learnt from people all over the globe, Egyptian, Greek, Spanish, African, Lithuanian, you name it. Their teaching staff were so globally experienced, name a country and they’ve worked there.

Moving onto the most important part of the exchange, Spring Break (sorry Mum). 3 girls, 6 countries, 10 cities, 5 flights, 1 overnight bus, a cross-country drive, a night on an airport floor, countless hostels, and endless coffee, all in 15 days. Now I can officially say I’ve walked to the smallest country in the world! I’m not even going to try and dive into this trip because there are too many stories for one page, and it’s something you just have to go out there and experience for yourself.

I honestly cannot even begin to explain how amazing my exchange was – I will always be so grateful for this experience and the support QUT offered from beginning to end. Being able to live, and study abroad with the administrative and financial help from your university isn’t an opportunity you should just let pass you by. My advice to those considering an exchange, go to virtual>study>open exchange application and submit. To those that are eagerly counting down the days until their flights, boy do I envy you! Just take each day as it comes and make the most of whatever situation you find yourself in. Don’t waste your weekend’s Facebooking friends from your dorm room – RyanAir is your new best friend. Book those $15 6:50am flights and go out and get a taste of the world! Everything will still be waiting for you when the dreaded day comes and you have to make your trek home. Then you’ll be where I am now, wishing more than anything that you could wake up and do it all over again.

Embracing Chilly Birmingham

Laura H., Bachelor of Business
University of Birmingham, England (Semester 2, 2017)

I completed my QUT Study Abroad exchange semester in the chilly city of Birmingham in the UK! My host institution was the University of Birmingham (UoB), and I could not recommend the university more highly. The staff provided exceptional amounts of support for exchange students like me, and we were made to feel incredibly welcome.

View of “Old Joe” Clock Tower from the University Library

Life on campus was so different to being at QUT- in a great way. The on-campus accommodation was more of a “college” style living situation and I shared a flat with six first year students. I made such awesome friends with everyone I was living with and could not stress the importance of making sure any future students make the most of their shared living situation!The learning and teaching style adopted by UOB was quite similar to that of QUT, which I found to be comforting. It allowed me to feel confident in my academic performance as the expectations were not dissimilar to those laid out by QUT. One difference, however, was that all my classes were compulsory to attend. This may sound daunting, but it was totally manageable due to the fact that I wasn’t balancing study with work as my Visa did not allow me to find employment in the UK.

During my time in England I always felt at home, as the cultural norms were not overly different when compared to those of Australia. Everyone I met also spoke English and because of this I was able to make great friends easily without language barriers. The only element to be aware of is the difference in weather! It’s safe to say that I wore my fair share of woollen sweaters to keep out the cold during Birmingham’s wintery months.

The Vale – my accommodation!

If I were to draw out some highlights from my experience, one would definitely be the friendships I have made throughout my exchange semester – I really have made friends that I will keep in contact with for life. Another highlight would have to be my travel experiences around the UK and Europe. Being based in Birmingham, it was incredibly easy to access other parts of the UK and Europe as the city has its own airport and great train system. Finally, the college living experience and campus-focused lifestyle was also something I will appreciate forever.The only tip I have for students considering an exchange is to jump in and go for it. I had such a fantastic time on my exchange and would gladly go back!

“100% Worth It” – University of Leeds Exchange

Natasha L., Bachelor of Business / Bachelor of Media and Communication
University of Leeds, England (Semester 1, 2016)

I was extremely nervous to begin my university exchange experience. I am quite a shy person and was unsure about how I would make friends, live away from home and navigate myself around a new city. However, going on exchange was definitely one of the best experiences I’ve ever had.

The University of Leeds is located in the northern region of England called Yorkshire and is known for it’s impressive school of communications as well as an amazing student union and social environment. I chose to study here because of the vast opportunities to get involved in university life and immerse myself in the entire exchange experience. Despite some initial fears, tears and freak-outs, I definitely settled in a lot more quickly than expected and made professional and personal connections that will last.

Walking around and learning the city of Leeds proved to be exceptionally easy from my accommodation, basically following one main street the entire way. I enjoyed exploring the city centre after uni and shopping at the local Kirkgate markets, going to grab a bite from the Corn Exchange or just admiring the old, intricate architecture on most buildings. Despite the fact that many compare Australia to England, I definitely felt that there were many differences and going to Leeds did pushed me to become more confident in new environments.

Staying in “Devonshire Halls” student residence for my exchange was one of the best decisions I had made. A range of exchange students had all chosen this accommodation and we were able to hang out, study and walk the 20 minutes to university together most days. I chose to be self catered but had the opportunity to meet people at special dinners, in the laundry room or at social events that the accommodation put on with live music and free food included!

I found that the cost of living in Leeds was similar to that of Brisbane, but that travelling around Europe in between did take up a huge portion of my savings. I travelled to more than 14 countries in my time away and found that I did need to always budget for more than I needed due to traveling mistakes or slip ups (i.e. missing a flight, booking a flight for the wrong month, booking a flight for the wrong city etc etc).  Many of my friends had the same issue and we all decided that over estimating your budget is a lot more beneficial to prevent stressful situations. I would encourage students to take $10,000 – $12,000 AUD per semester. In saying this, it is easy to stick to a budget when living in Leeds to due the ability to walk everywhere and the general cheap cost of living.

Exchange was an unforgettable experience that helped me grow and develop as a young adult. I gained confidence in social and professional situations and learnt how to handle myself independently when stressed. I made friends that will definitely last a lifetime and was able to meet and connect with people from all over the world. Although pushing yourself out of your comfort zone can be daunting, I believe that going on exchange is 100% worth it and it will be one of the best decisions you’ll ever make.

The Best Thing I’ve Done!

Isobella T., Bachelor of Business
University of Leeds, United Kingdom (Semester 2, 2016)

In January, I left my family and friends to spend a semester at the University of Leeds in England. I was told about Leeds by one of my friends, but I didn’t think much of it until I went to the QUT Exchange Fair, and one of the previous semester’s students told me how great it was, and how much fun he had. That made up my mind.

Leeds is a beautiful campus set between James Baillie – my residence- and the city. It was about 25 minutes walking from James Baillie, and 15-20 minutes from the city, with plenty of sights along the way. The campus contains two bars, the English love a good bevvy between classes, and turns into a three room nightclub on Fridays. Fruity on Fridays along with Otley Runs are staple Leeds outings. The University is big on being social, with heaps of clubs to join, as well as outings around England for exchange students. The city itself is full of different places to eat and drink. There is something on every night in Leeds, so you’re never running short of options, just remember to buy tickets online.

One of the wonderful places in Leeds!

The teaching in Leeds was a little different to QUT. Most lectures only ran for an hour, and none of them were recorded. Three of my subjects only had one piece of assessment that was worth 100%, which I found quite intimidating. Due to the credit transfer difference, I took five subjects, but I found them very manageable, and hardly had any homework, leaving me with plenty of time to travel.

Not much homework left me plenty of time to travel!

I budgeted about $15,000, and usually stuck to my £100 a week budget, depending on whether I went travelling or not. The exchange rate was pretty tragic when I left, but picked up towards the end. I used a Commonwealth Travel Money Card, and never had any problems. It was super easy and cheap to get to Europe, especially if you fly Ryan Air or Easy Jet, and we used Google Flights or Sky Scanner to find the cheapest flights. In March, we had a month long mid-semester break, so it was the perfect opportunity to visit Dublin, Zurich, Berlin, Prague, Vienna, Budapest, Krakow and Warsaw!

Visited Paris in the Mid Semester break

The friends I made on exchange were some of the best people I have ever met, with the majority of them from Canada and America. The first person I ever met in Leeds ended up being my best friend on exchange; we did many solo trips in Italy, The Netherlands, France, and Spain, and luckily, never got sick of each other. The atmosphere in Leeds is super welcoming and friendly, and my friends and I often had dinner together or went to the gym, because we lived so close.

Going on exchange was definitely the best thing I’ve done so far. I got to see Europe, live independently in another country, and meet some amazing people that I plan on visiting soon. It takes a lot of effort and planning in the beginning, but it is so worth it in the end. The only downside is how quick time flies: one moment, you’re arriving at Leeds Bradford airport and the next you’re saying goodbye in Manchester.

Making Hearty Friends Abroad

Fraser B., Bachelor of Media and Communication / Bachelor of Laws (Honours)
University of Leeds, United Kingdom (Semester 1, 2017)


January 15th, 2017 I packed my bags and headed for the UK. I hadn’t been to the UK since the summer Commonwealth game of 2002 in Manchester, and I was certain it had changed a little since then!

After spending a week in London seeing high school friends, I journeyed north to Leeds where myself and 500+ other exchange students settled into one of many student residences across the town. It took the better half of a week just to get familiar with faces, let alone knowing names. However, it didn’t take long before the international students formed one big group, the likes of which I’d never been a part of.  It was interesting watching all these different cultures assimilate in such a bizarre setting. The north of England, housing those from countries, which covered all continents. But, we made sure our time spent with each other was worth it, studying, travelling and creating friendships that will last much longer than our mere six month semester abroad.

I was very lucky to travel the European continent, to destinations I’d never been before. It was a priority of mine to not just go and see sights, but rather spend my time in these new destinations doing what the locals do. Because that’s how you assimilate and diversify yourself as a person, you learn from those who are native and can convey to you their culture and the way they live. You learn about the country itself, not just what it has to offer in aesthetics.

One blog post simply cannot encompass my exchange in semester 1 of 2017. There are simply too many memories, experiences and events that I’m sure all other students can relate to. The pictures, although pretty, do not do each destination justice. As to completely experience something, you must do so in the flesh.

Get the Real Experience at SHU

Jake T., Bachelor of Justice
Sheffield Hallam University, United Kingdom (Semester 1, 2017)

So, if you asked anyone from Australia to pin point exactly where Sheffield is in the United Kingdom, you’d be pretty far stretched to find someone who actually could. Well, I want to put Sheffield on the map. Over the past year, I spent my time studying abroad in the most underrated town and university in the UK. Okay, so maybe I’m a little biased because my girlfriend lives there, but hear me out. Sheffield Hallam University, or SHU as it’s fondly known as, is amazing, not because it’s old or in the top 10 unis in the world, but because it’s real. SHU is the kind of uni actual English people go to, not just exchange students. It’s the real Northern England. I mean come on guys, we go to the ‘Uni of the real world’ and this place is authentic. I love the fact that I never heard another Australian accent once, in fact for the whole year I was at SHU I don’t think there was another Aussie there. Sheffield is also extraordinary, it’s a town specifically built for uni students; there’s heaps of bars, and everywhere you go has student discounts.

The amount of students helps reiterate the fact that Sheffield is one of the safest cities in the UK, and it’s cheap compared to most major cities. Sure it’s not London or Manchester, but hop on a train and you can go anywhere soon enough. I still travelled all of Europe from Sheffield as well (and yes I found a little bit of time to study). SHU is great for another reason too, they have more students coming out the whazoo to come to QUT, so I got to apply late to go, and study abroad at QUT doesn’t usually allow you to stay for two semesters at one UK uni but hey, at SHU you can. Not to mention the staff from SHU helped me out tremendously and I almost received a round of applause for helping an SHU student be able to see the sun in Brisbane. I’m still picking my brain as to why no one wants to go to Sheffield Hallam, it’s awesome and I’ve come back to Australia wishing I was there instead trying to understand the northern accent (don’t try to, just nod and say yes) and eating greasy cheesy chips from a shop with questionable hygiene. Study Abroad for me wasn’t about the class and sophistication Cambridge university, it was about having an authentic and real experience. If you want to pretend you’re a real English student, attend a three letter uni, meet genuine people, go to Sheffield Hallam.

Luke’s Lancaster Life

Luke Barnes, Bachelor of Business/Laws                                                                  Lancaster University, England (Semester 1, 2017)

Lancaster University is in a beautiful location in the picturesque north of England. It was just a quick 2-hour train trip up from London Euston, a trip I made many times over the 3 months I stayed in Lancaster. It has great facilities, with over 12 different colleges, all which provide living space on campus and of course their own bar. All are perfect for an afternoon game of pool, darts and any other game of your choice. It is a proud university town, even once you get to the train station it loudly proclaims that it is the home of Lancaster University.

The on-campus accommodation was everything you could have asked, however the bathroom was slightly cramped. Despite this, the on-campus facilities were amazing. The University had everything you needed, with two small general stores, and plenty of takeout options. There were also numerous cafes for the coffee starved brain of any student; although just don’t expect it to be quite up to the Australian standard!

The cultural shock of going to England was pretty much non-existent, I think some of the Southern English found it more shocking to be up North than I found it halfway across the world. With the amazing transportation system a train ride could take you  almost anywhere in a short amount of time. Once in London, the tube also takes you wherever you need to be, in a matter of minutes.

Living in England made living away from home very easy. Although there are times you can still become a little home sick, when you think about how far away you are from your family. It also took me a while to adjust to the amount of daylight in the UK. In Summer it is still light until 10pm, and in Winter the sun sets by 4pm, which can be difficult.

Overall, the trip was unforgettable and there were many highlights throughout. On one occasion, my flat mates and I decided to hold a ‘good old Aussie BBQ’. I thought it would be a great idea to show my fellow international residents what it was like. We had one Cypriot, a Bulgarian and two English men along with myself, an Australian. The only thing that we did not consider was the fact that the temperature was only a little over freezing. In the blistering cold conditions, I like to think at least the food was good enough to get across what the essence of an Aussie BBQ is like…

As everyone says, exchange is an incredible experience. If you have the opportunity, grasp it with both hands – you will not regret it.

A Semester at the University of Leeds and 73,705kms of Travel!

Shannon M., Bachelor of Education (Secondary)
University of Leeds, England (Semester 1, 2016)

I had an incredible time in Leeds.

Gibraltar – a British Overseas Territory off the southern coast of Spain

Living in Devonshire Hall was one of the best experiences. Considering I had not lived out of home before, this was the best place to do it knowing I had incredible support through the Leeds accommodation office as well as with the international students I was sharing my flat with. They were from all around the world, had different culture, opinions and ideas to me but we all seemed to share similar interests – to have a good time, study and travel when possible.

Italy

Czech Republic

 

 

 

 

 

 

I participated in The University of Leeds Gryphons Baseball Club, the Leeds community slow pitch softball ‘Dales’ Club and I represented Leeds in an international slow pitch softball tournament in Czech Republic with “The Terriers”. This allowed me to meet a different group of people to what I was experiencing in halls and at university and allowed me to get to know the Leeds community and the people within.

The beach in France

Stone Henge, England

The way of teaching and delivering information was exceptionally different at the University of Leeds which I believe was an important experience for me as a future teacher. I was able to receive education by different modes of communication, became aware of different teaching pedagogues in use, saw new ways of teachers facilitating knowledge through activities and was even introduced to different ways of providing feedback.

England

Germany

Ireland

As I’m a student majoring in English teaching I believe studying in-depth English literature modules in England was extremely beneficial towards my future career. As I minor in History I regularly visited historical sites across Europe including Anne Frank House in Amsterdam, Auschwitz and Birkenau concentration camps in Poland, visited Jewish Synagogues in the Czech Republic, visited Jewish memorials around Europe and participated in Old Jewish Quarter walking tours in Germany. I believe experiences in these places has provided a new light and direction for my future lessons if I were employed to teach history.  In the future I will be able to provide my students the facts as well as personal thoughts and experiences while traveling on study abroad as a QUT student.

Wales

Poland

Austria

Malta

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I was accidentally homeless for a night in Ireland with 7 others, had my Iphone 6s and credit cards stolen from me in Germany, lived in questionable 30 bed hostel dorm rooms in Poland, explored numerous castles in England and Wales and even cruised across the Mediterranean (and more). I believe all of these experiences good and …not so good assisted in shaping the person I am now and will continue to shape me for the rest of my life.

Amsterdam

Spain

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My exchange spanned 73705 km / 45800 miles and helped me catch an insatiable desire to travel. All the places I visited are featured throughout this post.

Scottish Exchange

Emily, W. Bachelor of Business and Law

Strathclyde University, Glasgow, United Kingdom (Semester 1, 2017)

In Semester 1, 2017 I had the opportunity to study in Glasgow, Scotland for 5 months. Departing sunny Brisbane I landed in the UK to rain, wind and eventually non-stop snow until April. Glasgow is the largest and most vibrant city in Scotland, with approximately 2 million of the friendliest Glaswegians populating arguably the best part of Scotland. I was lucky to be in the busiest and most bustling part of the country, while still in such close proximity to the beautiful highlands that would put our tourism ads to shame!

My time in Glasgow was highlighted by the many friendly faces that were proud to welcome the new kids to their city, the endless pints at the local pubs and the fascination with men in kilts! Walking around the city centre, you were bound to see some funny and interesting sights, something I soon took in my stride and can laugh about now. I am grateful for all the opportunities we had to travel wherever we wanted, with just a quick plane trip taking us to the furthest corners of Europe, or a scenic train ride to explore the expanse of the UK.

While not forgetting the purpose of my trip, studying at the University of Strathclyde with a great mix of local and international students while also consulting with some fast-growing local companies gave me opportunities and experiences that I would never replicate anywhere but Glasgow!

As the Glaswegian’s like to say, the people make Glasgow!!