Becoming a Part of the Gamecock Family!

Marianne J., Master of Business
University of South Carolina, USA (Semester 2, 2017)

Going to Columbia and University of South Carolina (USC) gave me so much: the ultimate American college experience, friends for a lifetime and experiences I will never forget.

On Campus – Horseshoe

Preparation and Arrival

Once I got my official “Letter of Acceptance” from the partner institution I could start the visa application. As compared to applying for an Australian visa this process takes more time and effort. First, you need to apply online, pay fees, get approved, set up an interview date and then go to the actual embassy. Be aware that, upon your interview they will need to keep your passport for a maximum of two weeks in order to insert the visa, so be sure to have enough time before departing.

Darla Moore School of Business (DMSB)

When I arrived in Columbia, South Carolina, a friendly, old couple picked me up as a part of the airport reception provided by the university. I highly recommend everyone to attend orientation week, not only are some events compulsory, but this is where you`ll have the chance to meet with your fellow students and professors and a lot of useful information will be given. This is where I met most of the people that I become close to and hung out with the most the rest of the semester. Including that, there are loads of events that offer free food, and as a poor student you don`t want to miss that! I arrived just in time for the solar eclipse, where Columbia was in the zone of totality. I also arrived in time for hurricane Irma, and quickly got an insight into the natural disasters that can occur on this side of the world.

DMSB

Accommodation

As for housing, postgrads usually cannot live on campus, but there were plenty of other off-campus student communities. Unfortunately, all the short-term leases fill up rather quickly. I went onto the USC website and found students who were subleasing, and ended up staying in a four-people apartment at a place called Riverside – a ten minute drive from campus. Most of the off-campus communities have a shuttle running to and from campus every 30 min on week days, all with a common stop on campus. This made it easy even for international students to get around. Riverside apartments came fully furnished and are very conveniently located next to a Bi-Lo (grocery store), bowling alley, and restaurants. In the USA you pay rent monthly, and living in a student accommodation is usually very cheap. I paid approximately $610 AUD a month, excluding utilities.

Riverside Student Accommodation (Off-Campus)

College Life

Columbia is a major college town and the whole city is proudly supporting and representing USC and the Gamecock (school mascot). I was there in the fall semester and got to experience football season, which entailed a weekly game where 80 000 people came to cheer for the Black & Garnet. The team and school spirit that you will experience here is like nowhere else. USC is also lucky enough to have the biggest college gym in southeast America; Strom Thurmond; a three-level playground for athletics and free of charge for all students. I can honestly say that this is the best and nicest gym I have ever been to.

Football Game at Williams-Brice Stadium

Further, USC offers heaps of clubs to get involved with, no matter what interests you, they have it. I played indoor soccer and used the student gym and its amenities frequently, and personally thought it was fun to see what all the fuss about sororities and fraternities were all about.

Strom Thurmond – Student Gym

Classes

I had to have my study plan ready before going overseas but couldn’t officially enroll until I got to Columbia. To pass the requirements from QUT I had to enroll into four units at USC, where 48 Australian credit points were equivalent to 12 U.S. credit points (3 per unit). You are being told from the beginning to save your electives and I would really recommend doing so. Some of the classes I wanted to enroll in were either full or not available to exchange students, so having mostly electives left when going abroad made the process of choosing new ones, and having them approved, much easier. Bear in mind that attendance is compulsory in the States and can, along with participation, be a part of your end grade. The postgrad classes were relatively small, ranging from 15-30 students. Some classes could be challenging, but they were all achievable.

Columbia and the U.S.

Columbia has a climate that is a little similar to Brisbane. The summers are hot and humid, and long-lasting, while the winters can get chilly and sometimes below 0, but only for a few months. Throughout the semester you had plenty of time to explore. Columbia has a river that runs straight through the city, where tubing is a very common activity, especially on those hot summer days. Five Points and the Vista are the famous areas for restaurants and night life. This is where students usually come together to socialize.

Tubing on the River

Christmas

Halloween

Although, Columbia, or ‘Cola’ as the Americans call it, isn’t the biggest and most exciting city there are many places worth seeing only a few hours away. We went to Atlanta and saw the World of Coke, to Savannah – the 7th most haunted city in the U.S., Charleston –home of all Nicholas Sparks movies. Including bigger trips to NYC, DC and I even had time to go see my host family in Utah over Thanksgiving. It is also an experience in itself to celebrate the different public holidays like Labor Day, Halloween, and Christmas.

Atlanta Skyline

Atlanta – CNN Headquarters

New York

Washington DC

I really enjoyed my time at USC and am so grateful for the opportunity that I had to go abroad and become a Gamecock! I can`t say it enough, but if you have the chance – take it. Going abroad and all it implies is so worth it!

– Forever to Thee –

An Amazing Life in Denmark

Dermott P., Bachelor of Behavioural Science
University of Southern Denmark, Denmark (Semester 2, 2018)

My exchange took place in the small rainy town of Odense on the middle isle of Fyn in Denmark. Odense is the third largest city in Denmark but is still quite small, especially compared to Brisbane, but never the less, it was amazing. Sydansk Universitet or SDU is similar to QUT in the sense that it is a technical university with more modern buildings and a focus on practical areas of study and the applications of these, so I found it rather easy to slip into Uni life there.

Copenhagen

What was a massive shock to me however, was living in a college. Although I grew up with four siblings and I have been living in share houses since I was 19, this experience was one of the most reassured and foreign of my exchange. I shared a kitchen with 14 other people, 11 of whom were Danes which I believe gave me a really authentic experience of their culture.

Reichstag Building

The closest thing I received to culture shock would be the language and being constantly addressed in it rather than in English however this soon dissipated when I practiced my Danish vocabulary. I would say their culture in many ways is similar to ours, but due to living in the country side this may well be different in Copenhagen or Århus. Danes like to have a beer, make an inappropriate joke, play sports and games, and debate social matters, much like what I have experienced in Australia, so this was very comforting to me.

            Denmark is renowned for being an expensive place to live, but due to Australia also being an expensive place to live, I didn’t find this as much. Although yet again being in the country would have affected this rather than being in a major city such as Copenhagen where things do tend to be costlier. Throughout my time overseas, I find it hard to pick out any specific highlights due to everything amazing me.

If I had to pick out a few though, going to sauna and swim in a frozen lake on boxing day with my brothers would rate very highly, as would sleeping in the Sahara desert in Morocco. Less spectacular, but one memory I would hold exceptionally close was spending three days in Copenhagen with an old friend and seeing my favourite band who don’t often tour, let alone Australia. But in reality, there were too many experiences I had which I wish I could accurately describe how amazing they were. For future students considering exchange I would recommend being open with your mind and your heart, and never let something get you down for too long. Be friendly, be happy and you will make friends no matter where you go.

 

 

 

Get the Real Experience at SHU

Jake T., Bachelor of Justice
Sheffield Hallam University, United Kingdom (Semester 1, 2017)

So, if you asked anyone from Australia to pin point exactly where Sheffield is in the United Kingdom, you’d be pretty far stretched to find someone who actually could. Well, I want to put Sheffield on the map. Over the past year, I spent my time studying abroad in the most underrated town and university in the UK. Okay, so maybe I’m a little biased because my girlfriend lives there, but hear me out. Sheffield Hallam University, or SHU as it’s fondly known as, is amazing, not because it’s old or in the top 10 unis in the world, but because it’s real. SHU is the kind of uni actual English people go to, not just exchange students. It’s the real Northern England. I mean come on guys, we go to the ‘Uni of the real world’ and this place is authentic. I love the fact that I never heard another Australian accent once, in fact for the whole year I was at SHU I don’t think there was another Aussie there. Sheffield is also extraordinary, it’s a town specifically built for uni students; there’s heaps of bars, and everywhere you go has student discounts.

The amount of students helps reiterate the fact that Sheffield is one of the safest cities in the UK, and it’s cheap compared to most major cities. Sure it’s not London or Manchester, but hop on a train and you can go anywhere soon enough. I still travelled all of Europe from Sheffield as well (and yes I found a little bit of time to study). SHU is great for another reason too, they have more students coming out the whazoo to come to QUT, so I got to apply late to go, and study abroad at QUT doesn’t usually allow you to stay for two semesters at one UK uni but hey, at SHU you can. Not to mention the staff from SHU helped me out tremendously and I almost received a round of applause for helping an SHU student be able to see the sun in Brisbane. I’m still picking my brain as to why no one wants to go to Sheffield Hallam, it’s awesome and I’ve come back to Australia wishing I was there instead trying to understand the northern accent (don’t try to, just nod and say yes) and eating greasy cheesy chips from a shop with questionable hygiene. Study Abroad for me wasn’t about the class and sophistication Cambridge university, it was about having an authentic and real experience. If you want to pretend you’re a real English student, attend a three letter uni, meet genuine people, go to Sheffield Hallam.

Loving Leeds: What To Expect At The University Of Leeds

Gina O., Bachelor of Business/ Bachelor of Creative Industries
The University of Leeds, Semester 1, 2017

Upon my exchange at the University of Leeds, in Semester 1 of 2017, I learnt so much  about myself and the world surrounding me. Having gone on exchange with a friend I attend university with in Brisbane, I felt at ease having a friendly face with me on this epic journey. But soon I learnt that being a duo may have been our downfall as people assumed we did not need to be invited to hall events which led to us feeling isolated. But I was able to overcome this by putting myself out there, making sure I was out of my comfort zone and made life long memories with amazing people.

A lot of these people however were themselves exchange students. I found myself shocked at the little interest the local people in Leeds had in people from other countries. An interesting prospect considering the majority of their population is immigrants. It became more prominent as well after beginning my classes and I started to realise that in the classes I did not have any fellow exchange students in, it was quite difficult to make friends. People had already formed their own group of friends and were exceptionally unwelcoming to newcomers. As I had already made my own group of friends this did not faze me, you can’t please them all.

What I did enjoy about my classes was experiencing the different teaching styles offered at the University of Leeds. One lecturer in particular absolutely astounded me going above and beyond any other undergraduate level of teaching I had experienced. This particular lecturer really shone through and definitely made me happy with my choice of host university.

Travelling!

Another great aspect of my exchange experience was staying on campus and in the Halls. Not only could I get up 5 minutes before a lecture and take naps in between classes, but I was also surrounded by interesting people. We did lots together: dinners, birthday parties and travelling! I cannot begin to tell you what it was like to travel to a different country nearly every weekend, other than it’s a worthwhile experience. Costly, but WORTH IT. The reason I chose the University of Leeds is because it had it’s own airport and it was close to pretty well everything in Europe.

Leeds, the town.

Also the town of Leeds itself is BUZZING. A small University town with your rival University being Beckett makes for a lot of fun. They always have something going on in the center and great student deals pretty much everywhere. I’m not trying to talk up the University of Leeds, but simply the whole exchange program. You get the proper opportunity to live and study in a different country, with government support. Why wouldn’t you, it may be the best thing you ever do!

My Irish Pot of Gold: Part 2

Elizabeth B., Bachelor of Business/Creative Industries
University College Dublin, Ireland (Semester 1, 2017)

A three-day road trip around the east coast of Ireland

If I could give any advice it would be to take advantage of every opportunity, and learn to say ‘yes’ to everything, especially things that are out of your comfort zone. This
is where some of my best experiences began, including exchange. This
means travelling with people you may not know very well, and doing trips that you may not normally think of doing. For me one of the best things was going over
with a very loose plan! Don’t be afraid to have very little planned before you leave, including a return date because I was able to travel with friends I met on exchange afterwards, and I was glad that I did not have a huge amount that I had committed to prior to leaving.

Lisbon, Portugal

While in Ireland I tried my best to learn (a very small) amount of Gaelic through some of my Irish friends, which is an incredibly hard language to learn. It was
fascinating learning about the Irish culture, and really getting to know some Irish people, and where they come from. While it can be difficult to meet Irish students while abroad, I was fortunate to meet quite a few Irish students through my external accommodation. I also found doing social sport was a good way to meet Irish students. I was a part of the social netball team while in Ireland, and was fascinated to find out that Netball is not a widely known sport in Ireland. There was only one team on campus and half the team consisted of Australian or New Zealand exchange students. I was incredibly lucky to be able to completely immerse myself in Irish culture, and experience life living and
studying in another country, which gave me a completely different experience to what I would have got being a tourist. Reflecting on my time in Ireland, while I visited some pretty incredible places, I wish I had focused a bit more of my travels around Ireland, and attempted to visit more pubs. I only went on four trips around Ireland, which meant there was a lot of the country I didn’t see such as the cliffs of Moher. I will definitely have to make a trip back to Ireland soon!

Finally, I would definitely recommend going on exchange to anyone considering it. It is a once in a lifetime experience, and you will grow so much, meet some incredible people and experience some life-changing events and opportunities. While I am nearing the end of my degree, this trip has made me realise my potential and has made me eager to plan my next trip!

My Irish Pot of Gold: Part 1

Elizabeth B., Bachelor of Business/Creative Industries
University College Dublin, Ireland (Semester 2, 2017)

One thing I did not anticipate leaving Australia is I don’t think I will ever feel completely at home again; part of me will always belong some place else, but that is a small price to pay for loving and knowing people and places all around the world.

If you had asked me 18 months ago that I would have had seven months abroad, visiting 12 countries, and meeting some of the most amazing people, I would not have believed you. The decision to go on exchange was not one I took lightly.

River Liffey at Dusk – Central Dublin

It required dedication and patience to the process, many hours per week of casual work to save up a decent travel fund, and a huge amount of independence. Leaving everything and everyone you know for seven months is an incredibly intimidating thought, and one that weighed heavy on my mind in the months leading up to my departure to Ireland. While there were moments during the beginning of my arrival to Dublin where I was uncertain I had made the right decision, and moments where I missed my family and friends immensely, the support and encouragement I received back home helped me get into the swing of my Irish lifestyle very quickly. I got to meet the amazing people I now call some of my best friends, and I am so thankful for my decisions to study abroad.

 

Seljalandsfoss, Iceland

In those months abroad, I was based in the rainy but gorgeous Dublin, Ireland, however I got to travel to many other places on weekends and breaks. I also spent 7 weeks after my exchange travelling to some other incredible places like Greece and Croatia. I attended University College Dublin (UCD). While UCD was not central to Dublin like Trinity, it was only a short 15 minute bus trip to the city center. The campus was large but beautiful. It had modern sandstone buildings, big grass areas, and two main lakes, where Irish students would gather every time the sun was out. There was also a gym membership included for all students, which was a good destressor, and helped me regain some aspects of normality and routine. The gym was on campus, and included free classes and consultations. I did five subjects while abroad in Ireland, with three of them being direct credits to QUT subjects. I found the workload to be quite heavy, but without a job in Ireland, I managed to juggle travel, work and social life quite well.

Barcelona, Spain

My favourite and most unique escape while in Dublin was Iceland. A few other international students and I hired a car, booked some cabins in the middle of the Icelandic countryside and did a four-day road trip to some of the most fascinating, and ‘off the map’ places. The natural beauties of Iceland were breathtaking, and we got to do things I never thought I would be able to do. If you are okay with eating hot dogs for breakfast lunch and dinner (a meal at a restaurant is often about 35-40 euros for a burger), and splashing out on flights and accommodation, then I recommend Iceland to anyone. It was a trip that I will never forget!

Luke’s Lancaster Life

Luke Barnes, Bachelor of Business/Laws                                                                  Lancaster University, England (Semester 1, 2017)

Lancaster University is in a beautiful location in the picturesque north of England. It was just a quick 2-hour train trip up from London Euston, a trip I made many times over the 3 months I stayed in Lancaster. It has great facilities, with over 12 different colleges, all which provide living space on campus and of course their own bar. All are perfect for an afternoon game of pool, darts and any other game of your choice. It is a proud university town, even once you get to the train station it loudly proclaims that it is the home of Lancaster University.

The on-campus accommodation was everything you could have asked, however the bathroom was slightly cramped. Despite this, the on-campus facilities were amazing. The University had everything you needed, with two small general stores, and plenty of takeout options. There were also numerous cafes for the coffee starved brain of any student; although just don’t expect it to be quite up to the Australian standard!

The cultural shock of going to England was pretty much non-existent, I think some of the Southern English found it more shocking to be up North than I found it halfway across the world. With the amazing transportation system a train ride could take you  almost anywhere in a short amount of time. Once in London, the tube also takes you wherever you need to be, in a matter of minutes.

Living in England made living away from home very easy. Although there are times you can still become a little home sick, when you think about how far away you are from your family. It also took me a while to adjust to the amount of daylight in the UK. In Summer it is still light until 10pm, and in Winter the sun sets by 4pm, which can be difficult.

Overall, the trip was unforgettable and there were many highlights throughout. On one occasion, my flat mates and I decided to hold a ‘good old Aussie BBQ’. I thought it would be a great idea to show my fellow international residents what it was like. We had one Cypriot, a Bulgarian and two English men along with myself, an Australian. The only thing that we did not consider was the fact that the temperature was only a little over freezing. In the blistering cold conditions, I like to think at least the food was good enough to get across what the essence of an Aussie BBQ is like…

As everyone says, exchange is an incredible experience. If you have the opportunity, grasp it with both hands – you will not regret it.

My London Adventure

Tammica C, Bachelor of Business (Marketing)
Cass Business school – City University of London, UK, (Semester 2, 2017)

My journey started when I first entered QUT and looked into doing an exchange. I gather a little info but enough to tell me I had to wait until my second year to apply. The application process was stressful. Waiting so long to hear back was really hard. I felt like there was no time left to do anything and I hadn’t even found out if I was approved to go overseas! In the end it all worked out okay and I was on a plane to London.

I arrived in London and went to my first apartment (I sorted my own accommodation) which was horrific. Thankfully I had my sister who had been living in London already to stay with. I eventually moved after two weeks into my final house for the 6 months. It was a mission moving two massive suitcases through London in peak hour on the Tube but it was all part of the fun.

After 2 weeks it was time to start university! The campus was old and classic, so different from the modernised campus of QUT. I went to my welcome lecture and met my first friend who was from Spain! As we were leaving to get a coffee a rather tall young man came running over to be and with little breath asked me if I was Australian. And that is how I met Daniel, my best friend from QUT whom I met in London.

The first week was full of crazy activities for the exchange students to experience London. This included experiencing the night life, and bowling. I met some lovely girls in that first week and had some great times even though I skipped out of half of those activities. Class started and I participated in London Performing Arts, Creativity, Innovation & Design, New Venture Thinking, and PR planning and management. I had groups in three of these subjects and met more people from Spain, Canada, and America. My classes consisted of me seeing various plays and playhouse throughout London, facing entrepreneurial problems every week, creating creative work spaces, and analysing recent PR campaigns.

Outside of Uni I spent a lot of time visiting key locations and working. I would do many things with Daniel and a few other girls we had met. We went to the Shard, ate donuts on Primrose Hill, went to Wales, attended a lantern festival, and visited the Camden markets many times for the halloumi fires! I went to concerts and even a boat party organised by Cass. Daniel and I tried to go to as many cafes as possible during our time and spent many hours drinking peanut milkshakes and pancakes. It truly was the best time I have had and I would do it all over again tomorrow.

After Uni had concluded I shipped off and visited many countries throughout Europe. I went to Marrakech and rode camels, Barcelona and sat on the beach ( for the first time in forever!), Paris and Disneyland, Munich and snowboarded, Iceland, Greece, Scotland, Wales, Ireland. I spent 6 weeks travelling and saw so much of the world and loved places I thought I would hate and hated places I thought I would love.

Overall, my exchange was life changing. I made friends, saw places I never thought I would, did things I never thought I would do. I changed for the better and grew up so much. I would never and could never regret my amazing experience on my QUT Student Exchange.

There is Truly Something for Everyone in Berlin

Ben M., Bachelor of Engineering (Honours)/Bachelor of Information Technology
Technische Universität Berlin, Germany (Semester 1, 2017)

Standing in front of Technische Universitat Berlin

Berlin is the most exciting city I have ever been to, it is so culturally and ethnically diverse and for the last 7 months I’ve been lucky enough to call it my home while I completed an exchange program at the Technische Universität Berlin.

Although I told myself I would do lots of research and find out as much as I could about the city before I left, it became quickly apparent that that was not going to happen. So I landed in Berlin speaking no German, had no idea about the culture or the history surrounding the city.

Was I excited? Scared? Missing home? Lost? To be honest, after over 24 hours in flights and two stop overs, I was tired and couldn’t wait to sleep.

One of the most striking things about being there was, surprisingly, the language barrier. Majority of the population speaks very good English, and 99% of people under 30 will speak perfect English, yet despite this it’s a barrier to work out how to ask someone if they can speak English with you; and it feels somewhat weird to be speaking a Language which is not the main language. Even the little things like buying cheese or milk in a supermarket were made a lot harder by having no idea what was what.

After a couple of days my perspective changed though, with the help of google translate, no more jetlag and lots of hand gestures I started feeling much more comfortable and began to make some friends.

The city has a very dark and interesting past; surviving two world wars, the cold war and from even earlier. This, often incredibly varied history, has created a completely unique cultural blend and sense of freedom through the whole city that I’ve never experienced anywhere else in the world. It feels to a large extent that you can do whatever you would like, however you would like, as long as you don’t hurt other people, or the environment. And that’s how the city lives and the rules its inhabitants respect, which also leads to a complete culture of acceptance of individuality and who people are. In one day you will see goths, businessmen, families and a whole multitude of others, who by normal standards are ‘quirky’ or ‘different’, yet in Berlin no one would blink an eye, everyone and everything is treated as normal.

In central Berlin The Fernsehturm is a must see!

More than that there is truly something for everyone in this city. If you want to experience the worlds best techno clubs (Including places to sleep and buy food inside the clubs) you can, if you want to work for a start up, you can, if you’re interested in business methods, you can learn about that, if you want to do something creative you can do that.

The city and its people are supportive of no matter what you are interested in and no matter who you are, where you come from and what you like to do; which made living there one of the nicest experiences of my life.
That said, the city does definitely has its draw backs, it is an incredibly large and diverse city and its constantly changing which is not for the faint of heart. It is a big challenge to keep up with the city and if you’re not careful you can burn out very easily, which I saw many other exchange students do.

Studying in Germany is also completely different, the education system for University is much more free than in Australia, and for the most part students are given a large range of freedom when choosing subjects and the number of electives they have. This is also reflected in the learning style, which features much more self-directed learning than I was used to. Once I became used to this change it was fantastic, there was significantly less assignments, take home quizzes and some of my units had just one exam at the end of the semester. This did however mean a bit more of a crazy rush at the end of the semester, especially given they have no mid semester breaks.

Riding a bike through Berlin

Most of the universities are also state run and students do not pay for the tuition. This means, usually, less fancy, showy and flashy buildings and technology, but do not let that fool you, the standard of the education is incredible and has some of the best research and professors in the world.

My best takeaway from exchange was to learn German as a second language. Not only is it a great skill to have but it makes life a lot easier. Even the basics of the language instantly meant I could order food, drinks, and go shopping with a lot more ease. Once I began to meet people and have conversations in German a completely new world opened up to me.

Learning the language not only gave me the ability to make new friends but gave me a much greater value and understanding of the cultural norms and differences and allowed me to understand a lot more of the quirks and things that I wasn’t used to.

A great spot to see the Teufelsberg towers

Doing exchange was a fantastic opportunity that I was so fortunate to take, I learnt another language, experienced a city unlike any other and now have friends from all around the world. I can definitely recommend going to a city that is not first language English. Even if you don’t speak the language it will expose you to a completely different culture to what we are used to in Australia and give you many opportunities to learn a lot about your self and other people!

The experiences I had on exchange, and the things I learnt, make me feel like a completely different person. In just 7 months I learnt so much about myself and have memories and life lessons to carry with me for the rest of my life.

Live an all American life in Alabama

Sam C. Bachelor of Business/ Bachelor of Law (Honours)
University of Alabama (Semester 2, 2018)

Going to the University of Alabama on exchange was one of the most enriching experiences of my life. Stepping into a completely different culture and having the opportunity to be there for a prolonged period of time and truly immerse yourself is something that I had always aspired to do since I graduated high school. Being given that chance on exchange I was determined to take full advantage of everything that was offered to me and do my absolute best to get everything out of the experience. Right from the beginning of my exchange I adopted an open mindset in terms of participating in activities that were out of my comfort zones. I feel that this accompanied by an outgoing personality allowed me to quickly find my feet relatively and begin to develop friendships.

UoA!

On one of my first nights in Alabama myself and the other Australian I was with met a group of people who, unbeknownst to us at the time, would ultimately become our best friends on the exchange. With true Southern hospitality, these people ended up inviting us to their respective houses in Baton Rouge, Chicago, South Carolina and Tennessee at different times throughout the semester. Befriending local students also allowed me to truly experience the culture of the host university and have an authentic exchange experience.

Game days are a highlight

As our exchange unfolded I ended up meeting people from all different facets of the University and it truly felt that I had created a whole new friendship group, one removed from the one that I previously had back in Australia. For me this was probably the best thing about exchange and the thing that I miss the most being back in Brisbane. Overall, I would highly recommend exchange to everyone who is considering because there is no other experience like it!

Some of my favourite activities from

exchange:

  • Tailgating Aland football games;
  • Exploring local nature spots;
  • Greek life events; and
  • Trying (even if only once) some of the typical dining options that you see on tv e.g. Wendys, Chic-fil-a, waffle house etc.
  • We managed to fit in a lot of travelling, Chicago!