The Twin Cities!!

Eliza Blanch, Bachelor of Business (International)
University of Minnesota, USA (Semester 1, 2018)

I didn’t originally choose the University of Minnesota but as I was unable to go to my first choice, it seemed like the next best fit. The campus is huge and a little overwhelming at first but you soon find your way around and meet new people, making it the new normal. Everything about the school is a lot like you see in the movies. With sporting matches where everyone gets involved and college traditions, such as homecoming, it’s something that you may have never experienced before.

The university is located right near the city centre of Minneapolis. It is a quiet, nice town which I believed was great for a college student. This was especially for business students as there are many Fortune 500 companies who base themselves in Minneapolis and the school gives you a lot of opportunities to learn about what they do.

Although QUT and the University of Minnesota are both located in the city, due to their size they have completely different teaching styles. This is because you will attend two classes a week for the same subject which are a mixture of tutorials and lectures. You will also do a lot of compulsory homework for these classes but this was a good way to remember what you were learning.

The university had many strengths especially with the business school as it is highly regarded and well known in the country. Also, the exchange group that they have for business students is a great way to meet fellow exchange students and Americans.

During my stay, I stayed in off-campus housing where a lot of American college students stayed as it was cheaper than what the university offered and had better facilities. The facilities included my own room and bathroom, a desk, a swimming pool, gym and basketball court.For the year, I saved over $25,000 and tried my best to stick to a budget of around $1,500 a month. I would say that the cost in comparison to Brisbane would just be a little bit cheaper. However, it was very hard to stick to the budget because there are so many activities that you can do but they do cost money and sometimes it was easier to eat out. Whilst away I used a commonwealth travel card for most of my transactions but opened an American bank account to pay my rent as I was charged a service fee for using a foreign card.

I didn’t experience much of a culture shock due to the similarities between our two countries. But to ensure my safety whilst over there I made sure I didn’t put myself into dangerous situations and if out late at night made sure I always walked home with someone.

Some tips that I would give is to always have a can-do attitude whilst away and always say yes to new experiences that you might not do at home. If travelling within America I would suggest having a good size carry-on bag so that you don’t have to pay for check-in luggage. For travel insurance, I would recommend Travel Insurance Direct as they cover all you need and are reasonably priced. When flying I highly recommend Delta as they were always a good airline and provided free carry-on luggage and entertainment.

Coming back from the exchange I feel as though I am more independent and confident in the things I do. Academically I have broadened my knowledge of American business procedures, which will only help me develop my skills professionally back home. Going on exchange is a once in a lifetime opportunity and you meet so many people from all around the world who in the end become lifelong friends.

University of Florida – Top 10 Public University, Number 1 Exchange Destination

David Li, Bachelor of Laws
University of Florida, USA (Semester 1, 2018)

Looking back on the past semester, I am still left in disbelief at how quickly the 120 days studying abroad passed by.

Admittedly the beginning of exchange is rough. Firstly, there are a lot of documents and procedures required for entry into the US as a student. For example, I had to fly down to Sydney for a day to complete a two-minute interview at the US Consulate office. However, once you reach your destination you’ll be glad you went through all the trouble.

The University of Florida is situated in Gainesville, Florida. It is the definition of a college town. The college is a top 10 public university with over 50,000 students and pretty much the only noteworthy thing in its area. As such, the campus is huge. I stayed at Weaver Hall, which is the typical American dorm. However, these dorms are split between Americans and other international students, which provides the perfect opportunity to meet new people. Being situated on campus also made it very convenient to get everywhere.

The gym on campus is free to use to students and so is the bus system. I bought the meal plan, which meant I could go to the dining hall during its opening hours. The dining hall is buffet style. Although the food isn’t top quality, I would still recommend getting the meal plan if you don’t like cooking. There are plenty of other activities to do as well, and UF truly delivers a college experience.

The teaching method in the States is quite different. Instead of large pieces of assessment, they spread it out consistently over the semester in little chunks. Also, many classes mark you on participation, so you’ll have to go to class. I found this more manageable and less stressful in a way, since you’re always on top of your work and there isn’t a big final assessment piece like QUT subjects normally have.

I saved around 16,000AUD for exchange, which was vital since the exchange rate was really poor during my time there. I may have remained under-budget had I not gone travelling around America for a month afterwards. I used an international card setup in Brisbane and bought a T-Mobile phone plan while I was there.

On a more personal note, UF will always have a place in a heart. I’ve met so many amazing people and have had so many crazy experiences. It really does feel like a movie that played out in front me. It’s a surreal and bittersweet feeling looking at my life for the past six months, and knowing that it won’t ever be quite like that again. But that’s what makes exchange worth doing – the countless, unique experiences you’ll have and the extraordinary people you meet. Where else are you going to have people go crazy over your accent, or be surrounded by friends who all live a short walk away, or be able to study in a different country and immerse yourself in a culture wholly different to Australia’s.

Overall, exchange was one of the best times of my life. I can see why everyone recommends studying abroad. My biggest tip would be to go with an open mind. Exchange is what you make of it so be sure to make the most out of this once in a lifetime opportunity. It may be hard to prepare for exchange, and the initial days during it. However, in a matter of days your exchange destination will feel like home and you’ll be so glad you did it.

GO GATAS

Palm Trees, Hockey and Mark Zuckerburg’s House

Maddy Morwood, Bachelor of Mass Communication
San Jose State University, USA (Semester 1, 2018)

To me, the idea of exchange has always seemed so exciting and special. I had imaged myself attending university in London, and had some friends who had chosen to go there and loved it. But as I was doing my application, the idea of sunny California and the American college life jumped into my head, and I couldn’t stop thinking about it. I decided, fairly last minute (the way I do everything) to apply for California State colleges. I was lucky enough to get my top preference, San Jose State, and I had the greatest time and met some of the best people in the world.

 

Pre-trip, there was a lot to organise. I would advise everyone going to America to start planning your visa months in advance, as I left it pretty late and had a few close calls. I actually flew to Sydney for my visa, realised I forgotten an important form, had to fly home to retrieve it and then back again in the same day. I did a lot of research surrounding the living situation, and ended up deciding to live on campus in the CVB buildings. I know a few people who opted to rent in houses in the college town near the university, which I have heard rave reviews about. However, CVB was much more practical and easy.

Before I arrived in San Jose, I reached out to the two other students from QUT attending SJSU and we arranged to meet on the first day. I was really happy I did this, as it made navigating the first few so much easier. We helped each other find the grocery store and purchase bedding and everything else we needed. At the exchange meeting was where I met the rest of my friends – from Ireland, Scotland and England. Although I told myself to try and meet American friends, it’s basically inevitable that you will end up in a group of friends from exchange. I did eventually meet some American friends who I loved. Joining a sports team was definitely a great way to meet people; although I didn’t join a team myself.

The SJSU campus is a place I will never forget and hold close to my heart forever. It was one of the most beautiful, scenic places I have ever been – surrounded by tall palm trees everywhere. I loved it so much I would have a nap on the lawn somewhere every Monday and Wednesday morning after my 9am class. The classes in America were also so much different to here and they were compulsory but with no lectures. Instead, every subject met twice a week and nothing was recorded online. The course work itself was ridiculously easy, but I struggled going from watching lectures online in bed to attending 8 classes a week. By the end of the semester I liked it though, because you form such a great bond with your professors. I took a journalism editing class (nothing is offered like it here at QUT) and enjoyed it so much.

Staying in the Bay area of California turned out to be such a great location. Every weekend we would take trips to San Francisco, Santa Cruz, Sacramento and explored the tech region of the Silicon Valley. San Francisco was my absolute favourite place to visit, and the $7 train got us there from San Jose in an hour. We went to the SF baseball stadium to watch the Giants, explored Castro, Pier 39 Fisherman’s Wharf and the best place to shop, Haight St. We watched the Lakers vs the Kings in a NBA game in Sacramento, and we drove past Mark Zuckerberg’s house. We also had a weekend away at Yosemite National park, and a huge group of us rented a little cottage in the woods. This was one of my favourite weekends of my entire exchange.

Although I knew little about American sports before I arrived, I attended a San Jose Sharks NHL game and fell in love. We were living just a 10 minute walk from the San Jose ice hockey rink so we would walk to the stadium before the games, along with half of the city of San Jose. It was such a great atmosphere and the games were fast-paced and fun. A friend and I even splashed out on a ticket to a playoff game, where we saw the Sharks win the first round of the Stanley Cup playoffs in a 4-0 game sweep against the Ducks. Walking home in our jerseys yelling team chants with the rest of the city is definitely up there in my favourite nights of my exchange.

Saying goodbye to San Jose was really difficult as it had slowly become home for me. I had become so used to the college lifestyle, and having all my friends living in the same building. I had the best 6 months of my life and San Jose will always have a place in my heart.

Viva L’Italia!

Giulia Marrama, Bachelor of Laws
Universita Luigi Bocconi, Italy (Semester 1, 2018)

In Semester 1 2018, I travelled to Milan for a six-month exchange at Universita Luigi Bocconi. Milan is an incredible, vibrant city filled with history, amazing food, people, and fashion. Milan has the benefit of being a modern, metropolitan city while maintaining the classical Italian-styled architecture. The transport both within Milan and around Italy is very efficient and you can travel almost anywhere with the tram and train. I would recommend taking a tour with the Erasmus Student Network Body (ESN) at the beginning of semester, as this will allow you to connect with other exchange students and create strong friendships from the start.

When it comes to accommodation I decided to stay in an apartment with other Italian students. I had been accepted into the university’s Arcobaleno dorm but had been advised by previous students to try and find alternative accommodation. I was able to get an apartment with other Italian students in the suburb of Porta Romana. If you are thinking of getting an apartment I would highly recommend looking for one around this area. It was a perfect location that was only a 20-minute walk to the university and a 20-minute to the city centre. It was full of restaurants, bars, metro station, markets and everything you would need within a short walking distance.

Some of the tips that I would give include:

  1. Get involved in the events that ESN/University offers
  2. Be prepared to adapt to the Italian culture and lifestyle
  3. Keep in mind that the University does not alter their examination or course structures for exchange students and pass/fail is 60%
  4. Have fun and enjoy the remarkable ride that you have embarked on!

Couldn’t be happier with Edinburgh Napier

Alicia Shorey, Bachelor of Design
Edinburgh Napier University, Scotland (Semester 1, 2018)

View from Edinburgh Castle

When they say exchange will be the best experience of your life they aren’t lying. My time in Edinburgh was all that and more. Not only did I make great friends, but I got to eat my way all over Europe tasting different foods and experiencing new cultures.

Giles Church

Edinburgh Napier University is a small university with 3 different locations in Edinburgh. The university is quite laid back with classes being a combination of lectures and tutorials. Edinburgh is such a livable city with most things in walking distance. I decided to live off campus as it was more affordable and provided me with a more “local” experience. The suburb of Newington was a perfect location with everything from bars, clubs and restaurants all in walking distance. Arthur’s seat was right next door to my house and was a great place to unwind, reflect and see the city from a higher vantage point and is something I highly recommend doing. Edinburgh as a city is beautiful and rich in history and was the perfect place to go on exchange. You will never run out of things to while in Edinburgh. Hogmanay Celebrations -Whilst in Edinburgh I tried many forms of Haggis, took part in the Hogmanay celebrations went Ceilidh dancing and went sledding and picnicking through the meadows, however, what I enjoyed most was watching how people reacted to 14 degree heat (SUNBAKING!).

If I could recommend anything it would be to make the most of your time and travel as much as you can. Exchange provides the luxury of giving you the time to travel to where has cheap flights, so you don’t need a huge budget to be able to travel around, you just have to be strategic.  Because of this, I travelled to a number of countries that I didn’t even consider on going to before but ended up having the best time.

The six months I spent in Edinburgh has taught me so many things. The opportunity to live in another city and travel around both with friends as well as individually has taught me a lot about myself but most importantly has fulled a desire to travel and explore more in the future.

Aston-ishing England

Annabel Boersen, Bachelor of Business – International
Aston University, England (Semester 2, 2017 through Semester 1, 2018)

I absolutely loved my time on exchange at Aston University in Birmingham, UK. There were so many highlights of my trip both academic and cultural: including meeting Orlando Bloom!

I chose to go to Aston University as part of my BS08 Second Degree program, and to be honest, I hadn’t really researched too much on the location of the University before I arrived. I was surprised to find that it was right on the edge of Birmingham city centre (it took 20 mins to walk to the other side of the city). This meant that everything you needed was within walking distance! The city of Birmingham also has fantastic transport options to travel around the UK and Europe (multiple train and coach stations, and an international airport as well!). I went to Bratislava, Frankfurt, Dublin, and more with cheap flights from Birmingham. I also made an effort to see as much of the UK as possible. I went north to Edinburgh, did a narrow boat adventure into Wales, and even did a 7-day walking holiday along the Cornish Coastal Path (in Cornwall), just to name a few things. I definitely recommend that you take advantage of the central location of Birmingham to get around the UK in your time there.

Since I was at Aston for a full year exchange, I was able to secure accommodation on campus. This was awesome because it was only a 5-minute walk to any class. There was also a supermarket and gym on campus which meant that in winter if it was raining or snowing, you could still get to everything very easily. I lived in a female only 7 bedroom flat. I shared a kitchen with 6 other girls, and we each had our own room and bathroom. I

One of the highlights of my entire exchange was celebrating Christmas at Disneyland Paris with my sister, who had come out to visit over the Christmas break. It was so magical especially when it snowed, and is something that I won’t ever forget. Another highlight was the people that I met while I was there. Because my exchange went for a whole year, I took part in many activities, joined the university dance society and even found a casual job at a 5* hotel in the city centre. I met people not only from all around the UK, but from all around the world. I also connected with eight other Australians who were doing the same program as me and we went to all the classes together, which was great because it meant that I knew people who were going through the same experience and if we had any questions or issues, we could figure them out together. Another highlight was looking out my window and seeing it snow on campus (it snowed multiple times on my exchange, even through April)!

In terms of units, lectures and tutorials, the UK system, although similar, is quite different in some aspects. For example; attendance at all lectures and tutorials was recorded, timetables were assigned and not chosen, and some of our units that went for the entire year only had one piece of assessment (a 100% exam). In the first semester I studied five units and in the second I studied seven. This resulted in me having four 100% exams, two 80% exams, and one assignment all in the final examination period. But as hard as it sounds, I found it realistic and was not overwhelmed at all. It was also very interesting as all my lecturers came from different cultural backgrounds. I loved how cultural the whole experience turned out to be, despite me still being in an English speaking country!

I loved the whole experience and would totally recommend others to take part in an exchange to Aston University. If I could do it again, I would!

Onto Ontario!

Sebastian Voges-Haug, Bachelor of Business/Bachelor of Creative Industries
Queens University, Canada (Semester 1, 2018)

I had an amazing semester of exchange attending Queen’s University in Ontario, Canada. It was definitely a worthwhile experience and if I had the chance I’d do it again. Being on the other side of the globe, attending in the winter term in which the country experienced one of their harshest winters in decades could have been a setback, but it didn’t stop me from having the best time in true Canadian conditions.

Studying at the Smith School of Business (Queen’s University)
Classes at Queen’s were different with the university approaching their teaching style in a different way. Firstly the majority of my commerce classes required participation, of which consisted of 5-10% of your grade. This not only meant attending every class (even the early 8:30am sessions) but actively engaging in discussion with your professor and classmates. Nothing is recorded so you are unable to watch lectures online, however all my professors supplied the powerpoint slides on their version of Blackboard. This may be a turn-off for some students used to the QUT arrangements, but in attending one of Canada’s leading and most competitive business schools, the professors were some of the best in the country and were all actively engaging and friendly. You will most likely end up building a great rapport with them and they are always happy to help when needed – they especially like Australians.

Living at Queen’s
Life at the university was comparable to a lot of the college stereotypes. I lived in a great share house which was only a 2 minute walk from my classes. My housemates were really welcoming and the students you meet are definitely professionals at balancing their busy academic and social lives. Queen’s definitely has the best student culture I’ve ever witnessed and it won’t take long to feel right at home. The only thing that took some getting used to was the weather – one day it would be -25C with snow and wind chill, the next it would be raining with sleet and dangerously slippery ground. Coming from the sunshine state of Queensland it was definitely different, but it was great to experience something different from the norm.The Exchange Program
The ETC (Exchange Transfer Committee) at Queen’s were extremely well-managed, who truly integrated foreign exchange students from all around the globe into the country hosting multiple events to meet other students who are in the same shoes. The executive committee is partly run by students in their 4th year, each of which became some of my best mates. They arranged multiple events and trips, from visiting Montreal and Ottawa for weekend visits, viewing live hockey games, maple syrup farm visits and overall a tonne of social events. They also have a buddy program where you’ll get to meet more local Canadians who can provide local information for anything from class registration to travel tips.

Finances
I cannot over-emphasize the importance of a budget on exchange. The cost of living in Canada on face value is very similar to Australia, however after currency exchange, you will end up losing a fair bit of money outside of your allocated budget. Tax isn’t included on price tags and tipping is expected in multiple venues, this took some getting used to. Rent and utilities are often around $600-700 a month depending on the house, and I often used $85 CAD a fortnight for food. Most grocery stores offered cheap Tuesday/Thursdays for students, so I saved my shopping for then. Health insurance is a compulsory offering by the university however it is extremely affordable, you’ll have to pay for this on the first month of visiting. The two main setbacks are phone plans and transport – both in Ontario are extremely expensive so budgeting for their payment was vital.

Important Tips for Incoming Students:

  • Join the ‘Queen’s University – Off campus Housing’ Facebook page prior to arriving. New share house listings are posted daily, often providing details and photos of the house, as well as the tenants. Every commerce student goes on exchange in their 3rd year so there are multiple places open to lease, especially in their winter term.
  • Save your winter shopping for Canada – clothes and accessories are far cheaper within the country, and are far better designed for the climate than anything we sell. One winter jacket should suffice to get into the country.
  • Sign up for a travel card with your bank– it allows you to exchange funds on the fly and I used it to pay for the majority of items.
  • Set up a Canadian bank account – Rent is oftentimes only payable through e-transfer. On orientation, multiple banks will visit the university such as Scotiabank or CIBC who can set you up free of charge.

Benefits
I had the chance to experience a lot of what Canada has to offer, from Toronto and Montreal on the Eastern side, to the Banff/Alberta and Vancouver on the west. Each region has a tonne to see and do, from camping/hiking in the Rockies to enjoying poutine and Canadian drinks in the French Quebec area. Overall exchange in Canada was the most worthwhile experience, and having made close mates from all around the globe, I would recommend it to anyone.

Canada Eh?

Georgia Christie, Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Laws
The University of Calgary, Canada (Semester 1, 2018)

I arrived in Calgary on the 1st of January and could not believe the amount of snow that was covering the city; I found out later that Calgary had a massive cold snap in the days leading up to NYE with temperatures dropping to -30°C. So, I was quite terrified and unsure how I’d survive an entire winter. However, you do get used to the cold and start thinking that -5°C days are warm days.

The University of Calgary was quite different to QUT. Classes are not recorded and I even had a political science prof (lecturer) who did not upload any slides online, so if you missed a class you missed a whole heap of content. The university is very focused on sports, and as a student you get access to the gym and all the sporting facilities. During the winter semester, it’s all about hockey and there are plenty of games you can go watch. There’s also the Olympic Oval which was the ice-skating rink used in the 1988 Winter Olympics and it is open for public use.

I stayed in residence at Cascade Hall for the semester and this was where most exchange students stayed, so there were always other international students around. This also meant that I spent most of my time with other exchange students rather than Canadians.

My exchange experience was incredible and I experienced so many uniquely Canadian things. At first, Tim Hortons is a very confusing concept: it’s not a café and it’s not fast food but somewhere in the middle but after a while, Timmies becomes a staple for all road trips, ski days and early morning classes.

The Rocky Mountains are only a short drive away from Calgary and this is where I really enjoyed the North American winter. Alberta is    home to many world-class ski resorts and I was lucky enough to ski and even try snowboarding at a lot of them. It is definitely easier to enjoy the Rockies by getting a car and exploring all the mountain villages. Banff and Jasper are very popular towns with great nightlife, food, hikes and of course skiing. I highly recommend driving up the Icefields parkway from Banff to Jasper, it is truly one of the most beautiful drives in the whole world.

Canadians really live up to the stereotype of being very nice people and they love Australians, so it wasn’t difficult to feel at home in Calgary. I was shocked at how country Calgary is, there is always country music playing at clubs/bars and people actually wear cowboy hats and boots around.

Without a doubt, the best part of exchange is the people you meet. I met many other exchange students, Canadians and people from all over the world who were travelling Canada. The people I became friends with on exchange are friends for life and I can’t wait to visit them all again. After my semester was over, I travelled around Canada, New York and California for a month. I definitely recommend travelling to eastern Canada because it is so different from Calgary or Vancouver, so you miss out on the full Canadian experience if you just stay on the west coast.

My exchange experience was by far the best thing I have ever done and I can’t wait to go back to Alberta again one day.

Living in Italy

Alexandra Bell, Bachelor of Design
Politecnico Di Milano, Italy (Semester 2, 2017)

Polimi, Polimi, Polimi… where to begin. Good facilities (not the most flexible opening hours), and lovely and warm people, but the university was significantly less organised (which I chalked up to cultural differences). Be prepared for your lecturers and fellow students to always be late, and don’t rush into the classroom while your lecturer is speaking because they definitely won’t appreciate it.

The facilities opening hours are 9am to around 9pm, however, for practical course-takers, the workshop rooms are from 9am to 6pm. Don’t forget the hour lunch break too! Lunch breaks apply to the whole country, with many shops, cafes, and businesses shutting their doors to eat and take a break – this can last multiple hours, so be prepared.

HIGHLIGHTS
Gosh – everything? I made excellent friends with my roommates and peers and got to experience and learn about their cultures. I even met a guy who stood through two hurricanes! I travelled so much – the cheapest website is goeuro.com and also look out for the blablacar car app. I am so grateful for my whole experience and can confidently say that my point of view of the world has become significantly more open to different pathways and values in life. And how could I not mention; the wine is so cheap my friends. Make use of it!

THINGS I DIDN’T EXPECT
All the professors will most likely revert to speaking Italian! For you to learn a little is a huge advantage as this also applies to grocery shopping. Also, the language is pretty fun to learn and everything is pronounced exactly as it is spelt (for example, they wouldn’t say the girl’s name is Selene as in ‘Seh-leen’ but as in ‘Seh-leh-neh’, capisci?)

ADVICE
Go ham on the food! The pizza there is the best thing I’ve ever tasted, and the gelato makes me want to cry. Try to say yes to every social event and opportunity (while taking your studies seriously enough). Be friendly and you will most likely make lots of friends with other exchange students (and a few Italians). The best website for looking for housing is uniplaces.com, but there are a lot more too! Finally, be organised, think big, and get excited!

A Cultural Explosion – My first few weeks in Hong Kong

Regina Collins

Bachelor of Law (Honours)/Bachelor of Media and Communication

Hong Kong Baptist University (Semester 2, 2018)

你好 (Nǐ hǎo) or Hello!

My name is Regina Collins and I’m in my third year of studying a Bachelor of Law (Honours)/Bachelor of Media and Communication at QUT. I have just started my Semester Exchange at Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) here in Hong Kong and it’s hard to believe it’s already been a month since I began this journey.

Hong Kong as an exchange destination is everything I hoped it would be – a true explosion of culture. No matter where you’re from, I believe that Hong Kong has a place for you and the rich variety of culture is what makes living here such a fascinating and eye-opening experience. I decided when applying for the QUT Study Abroad program that I wanted to live in an entirely new culture unlike anywhere I’ve lived before. And while I will say that Hong Kong has fit that description, there is a certain similarity to Australian culture that make this place instantly feel like a second home.

Adjusting to living in a sleepless city like Hong Kong did take a few days. By the end of week one, I had mastered the Mass Transit Railway (MTR) system and using my Octopus Card (which is, in a lot of ways, similar to that of a Go-Card in Queensland). I can now also navigate around my campus neighbourhood, know where the cheapest place to buy groceries is, and have a basic understanding of Hong Kong Currency in comparison to the Australian Dollar.

Having been here for a month now, I can definitely say I’m making the most of this incredible experience. A few of my favourite journeys so far have been catching the tram up to Victoria Peak, navigating through the Ladies’ Market in Mong Kok, taking the cable car up to the Big Buddha on Lantau Island, and of course, Hong Kong Disneyland.

Through this, I have formed memories with so many incredible people from around the world and began what I hope to be lifelong friendships.

At the end of the day, I still like l have so much to explore on this exchange and I look forward to seeing what else this beautiful, vibrant and cultural city has to offer. I intend to keep learning and thriving in such a unique environment and I’m so grateful to QUT and NCP for giving me this opportunity of a lifetime.

希望再次见到你 (Xīwàng zài jiàn dào nǐ) or Hope to see you again soon!

This student’s exchange is supported by funding from the Australian government’s New Colombo Plan