Library opening hours and online support over the break

QUT Library opening hours are about to change for the upcoming holidays.

1907 Panic by Soerfm
1907 Panic by Soerfm
(CC BY SA)

Library hours will be reduced, and some days your library may even be closed. Please check your library opening hours before heading in.

No need to panic though — you can access awesome online study support, and return your borrowed items to any QUT Library return shute 24 hours a day.

If you are already at the beach you can still access the ask a librarian chat service during the usual hours until April 20th. We’ll have a short break and be back on Saturday, April 26th.

Enjoy your break!

Help with writing and referencing a click away

Help! I have a report due on Friday…

My tutor went through it in class and it looked pretty straightforward but now I have to write the thing I just don’t know…

This is embarrassing, but I haven’t written an essay in years…

These are the types of questions and comments we hear at the Library Learning and Research Desk every day. The answers to these and many more questions are all found in one great tool…

cite write

QUT cite|write is more than just a heap of excellent examples showing you how to correctly cite sources and create an awesome looking (and correct) reference list. (Useful as that is.) QUT cite|write will also walk you through the process of creating your report/review/critique/ other type of assignment.

And don’t forget to double check your assignment information and ensure you are following the correct format.

Happy Writing!

 

Referencing a Chapter in an Edited Book

You might have noticed that some of your textbooks, particularly the bigger ones, will have an editor, or editors, and different authors for each of the chapters or sections. When it comes to referencing these, you need to put the chapter author in your in-text citation, but both the editor(s) & the chapter author(s) in your reference list.

For example:

QUT APA: Honan, E. (2010) Literacies. In D. Pendergast & N. Bahr (Eds.) Teaching middle years: Rethinking curriculum, pedagogy and assessment (2nd Ed.) (pp.139-154). Crows Nest NSW.: Allen & Unwin.
 
QUT Harvard: Honan, E. 2010. “Literacies.” In Teaching middle years: Rethinking curriculum, pedagogy and assessment. 2nd ed. edited by Donna Pendergast & Nan Bahr, 139-154. Crows Nest, NSW: Allen & Unwin.

How to know if the book is edited or not? The editors are usually clearly identified on the front cover and title pages. You can also check the table of contents to see if different authors are listed for different chapters.

There is a specific example in CiteWrite for referencing a chapter in an edited book. This can be found in the Book tab.

Things to remember:

  • If the editors and authors of a particular chapter are the same, use the name twice;
  • If you use different chapters from the same book, treat them as separate sources, and list them separately in your Reference List;
  • You only need to use this format if the particular chapter is written by (a) different author(s). If the book has the one author, or multiple authors, but not for each chapter, just reference it as a book, even if you’ve only used information from one specific chapter – page numbers should point your reader to the information.

As always, check CiteWrite first, and if you’re still in doubt, ask at the Library’s Learning & Research Desk.

Need some extra help with getting assignments underway? What about trying Study Solutions?

The Learning and Research Desk is a great place to come when you’re looking for help , but if you think you might need some extra assistance with your study, Study Solutions might be exactly what you’re looking for!

Study Solutions is a free service where you can receive individual assistance from experienced staff who will work with you on your academic study issues.

Bring your assignment topic, project task or study challenge…solve tricky referencing, find the best information sources for your assignments,  write more effectively,manage your time better, prepare well for exams… or simply get better grades. However, there is one thing library staff won’t do and that is proofread your entire assignment.  What we will do, though, is help you to develop the skills to edit and proofread your assignments yourself.

Study Solutions is available at all branches of QUT Library.  To register for your free appointment, Book now or enquire at the Learning and Research Desk.

For extra study and research resources, visit  Studywell

Tricky Referencing #1

Author quoted in another work (Secondary Source):

Ever come across a really great quote or piece of information while you’re reading a journal article for your latest assignment, only to find out that the author(s) got it from somewhere else? Want to reference it but not sure how?

The first thing you should do is try and locate the original article or book – find the full reference in the reference list at the end of the article and try searching on the Library Catalogue or Quick Find. If it is a reputable, scholarly, reliable source that is relatively recent, you should be able to locate it. You would generally only want to use a secondary source if the item is out of print, written in a foreign language, or unavailable through usual avenues.

If this is the case, and you really can’t find the information anywhere else, you will need to reference it as a “secondary source”. Essentially, you name the primary author AND cite the secondary author in-text, but only the secondary author in your reference list.

Examples for referencing a secondary source can be located on CiteWrite under the Authors tab.

For example:
APA:
In-text: Primary author (as cited in Secondary Author, Year, p. _);                   Reference List: Secondary Author. (Year). Title of Secondary Work. Place of publication: Publisher.

Harvard:
In-text: (primary author quoted in secondary author, date, pg no.);                  Reference List: Secondary author. Year. Title of secondary source. Place of publication: Publisher.

Top Tips for referencing a Secondary Source:

  1. Always see if the original source is available first and read it – it is possible that the information or quote has been taken out of context or re-worded to suit the secondary author’s argument;
  2. Don’t reference the original source if you haven’t actually read it – putting a source in your reference list when you haven’t actually used it in your assignment can constitute plagiarism and can result in losing valuable marks;
  3. Use secondary source references sparingly – for example, if the resource is out of print, or written in a foreign language, and if the information is unavailable anywhere else.

Don’t forget! CiteWrite should be your first stop for any referencing queries. If you’re still in doubt, come and ask at the Learning & Research Desk @ the Library.

Need some extra help with getting assignments underway? What about trying Study Solutions?

The Learning and Research Desk is a great place to come when you’re looking for help , but if you think you might need some extra assistance with your study, Study Solutions might be exactly what you’re looking for!

Study Solutions is a free service where you can receive individual assistance from experienced staff who will work with you on your academic study issues.

Bring your assignment topic, project task or study challenge…solve tricky referencing, find the best information sources for your assignments,  write more effectively,manage your time better, prepare well for exams… or simply get better grades. However, there is one thing library staff won’t do and that is proofread your entire assignment.  What we will do, though, is help you to develop the skills to edit and proofread your assignments yourself.

Study Solutions is available at all branches of QUT Library.  To register for your free appointment, Book now or enquire at the Learning and Research Desk.

For extra study and research resources, visit  Studywell

Nursing Assignment Resuscitation Workshop

Nursing students, would you like to brush up your assignment skills before the start of semester two?  If so, this workshop is for you!

Come along to the Library on Monday 16th of July and we will take you through academic writing skills, researching your assignment and correctly referencing your sources.

The workshop will be held in B2.07 and will run from 9.00 am – 1.00pm.  A light morning tea will be provided.

If you have any questions  or would like to register to attend, just comment on this blog post, including your full name (so we know who you are).  Remember to let us know if you have anything you would like specifically covered in the workshop.

Referencing a Journal Article

Academic journals are collections of articles that are published on a regular basis and contain up to date information in a particular subject area. Therefore journal articles are an important component of assignment research and need to be correctly referenced when completing an assignment.

It helps to remember that the rules for referencing a journal article are basically the same, regardless of the format. Both print and electronic journal articles in your reference list must contain the following elements: author, date, article title, journal name, volume number, issue number and page numbers. You will find these details either on the article or in the database record. The only time you will not include an issue number in your reference is when the journal article does not have have one.

Now consider the format of your journal article. If it is a print article there is no more to add to the reference! For electronic articles there is just one more step. Does your journal article have a DOI? This provides a permanent link to an online resource and is usually printed on the first page of an electronic journal article. Alternatively you can check if a DOI for your electronic journal article exists by searching the CrossRef database (http://www.crossref.org). The DOI is placed after the page numbers in your reference. If a DOI is unavailable for your electronic journal article, do a quick web search to locate the home page of the journal/magazine/publisher and provide this URL instead of a DOI.

Always check the final format of your reference including the order of elements, punctuation and the use of capitals or italics by referring to QUT cite|write. In your reference style, eg QUT APA or QUT Harvard, select the Journal Articles tab and then view Types of Journal Articles.

Remember, if you need help, come to the Learning and Research Desk, give us a call or chat to a librarian online.  Happy referencing!

QUT cite | write

Reference and write right, now – save time, later.

Academic referencing, citing and writing is a skill. Doing it well takes time and practice but it is not difficult once you understand the basics, develop your skills and know where to find help.
QUT cite|write is your best place to start.

The booklet gives you a general overview on the different styles used at QUT, explains what referencing and citing is and why it is important, and provides a basic introduction to academic writing. Students new to QUT can pick up a free copy at any Library Learning and Research Desk or anyone can download a copy from the QUT cite|write website.

The website gives referencing and citing examples in each of the four styles, as well as guides for writing in different formats. It is the practical tool to use while you work on your assignments.

Then, if you still aren’t sure, the Library has people who can assist you. Come in and ask.

You have lots of deadlines and little time so don’t risk getting it wrong and or getting caught out. Start right, start now, start here: http://www.citewrite.qut.edu.au/

Start the Academic Year Off Right!

QUT Library is running  a range of academic skills workshops throughout the first four weeks of semester.  Whether you’re a new student just starting out, or a continuing student, who would just like to brush up on your study skills, these workshops will give you invaluable tips to help you with your studies.

All workshops are presented by your friendly Caboolture Library staff and include:

Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/kingbob86/5965680173/sizes/m/in/photostream/

  • Assignment research
  • The Writing process
  • Editing and proofreading
  • Effective learning and time management
  • QUT Referencing
  • Preparing for exams

See what other workshops are available and register for sessions, or click on the Workshops and tours link on the QUT Library homepage.  If you have any enquiries about the workshops please ask at the Learning and Research Desk or call the library on 5316 7420.