Referencing Hack #7 – Referencing work quoted by someone else with QUT APA

Referencing an author you read quoted in a book or article by a completely different author can be tricky. Ideally you should find the original source of the quotation but this may not always be possible. But if you can’t, no worries, QUT Library is here to help with our next Referencing Hack!

To reference an author quoted in another work in your reference list, you only need to provide a reference for the source you actually read. This is known as the “secondary source” because it is one step removed from the original source of the idea or quotation. Don’t reference the original source if you haven’t read it yourself, this is a big referencing no-no. In the text of your assignment you need to cite the original author but add the prefix “as cited in” along with the citation for the secondary source after the original authors surname.

Here is an example of how to reference this type of information in the text of your assignment –

Image of an example in text citation. The example is a short quote that reads, according to Rowling open round bracket as cited in Jones 2015 page 301 close round bracket, the Dursleys were open quotation mark were proud to say that they were perfectly normal, thank you very much. Close quotation mark.

The secondary source is Jones (the text you actually read) so Jones is the resource that will appear in the reference list.

For your reference list only include the secondary source information, like so –

Image of an example of an entry in a reference list. The example is author of work which is Jones, F. Year of publication which is Open bracket 2015 close bracket. Title of book which is Juxtapositions of magic and suburbia in late twentieth century fiction. Place of publication which is New York, New York. Publisher which is Powell.

Check QUT Cite|Write APA for how to reference a book, journal article or other types of sources your secondary source might be. Plus you can find more information about referencing authors quoted in another author’s other work in QUT Cite|Write. Just go to the bottom of the page under “need help with” and look for further information on Authors.

Don’t forget to check out our other Referencing Hacks for help with your referencing! Or contact us for further assistance.

Referencing Hacks #6 – Numbered Images

Numbered referencing can be one tough cookie to crack. One particular question we get asked a lot is how to reference an image taken from the internet using QUT Numbered referencing. Have no fear! We have consulted the experts and this is the template we recommend.

[number] Author. Title of image [image on the Internet]. Date [cited date]. Available from: URL

Don’t have all of these pieces of information for your image? Here are some handy hints on how to navigate this.

  • No author? Check for an organisation or corporate author. If still none, omit this information
  • No date? Replace this section with [date unknown].
  • No title? Write a brief description of the image in square brackets and put this where the title would be.

Of course this only makes sense with some examples. Have a look at these to get more of an idea of what your numbered reference should look like for an image.

[1] Breath in cold air [image on the Internet]. [date unknown] [cited 2017 Sept 11]. Available from: https://motorimpairment.neura.edu.au/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/breathing1.jpg

[2] Centres for Disease Control and Prevention. Shingles on face [image on the Internet]. 2011 [cited 2017 Aug 22]. Available from: http://www.cdc.gov/shingles/about/photos.html

[3] Wisegeek. [Exterior view of ear with dry skin] [image on the Internet]. [date unknown] [cited 2017 Sept 11]. Available from: http://www.wisegeek.com/how-do-i-treat-dry-skin-in-the-ears.htm#

You can view more referencing hacks from QUT Library and if you need assistance, contact your referencing experts!

Referencing Hack #5 – Legal Dictionaries

Legal referencing can be tricky. One question the library sees often is how to cite a legal dictionary. After collaborating with law academics this is what we suggest when referencing an online legal dictionary with QUT Legal

Your footnote must contain:

1. Name of the publisher, title of the legal dictionary, (date of last update of the defined term or if that is not available then date of retrieval preceded by ‘at’), ‘name of defined term’ (name of related area of law) [pinpoint reference as a paragraph number, if one exists].

Here is our example –

  1. LexisNexis, Encyclopaedic Australian Legal Dictionary (at 9 August 2016), ‘Council’ (Environment) [1].

Is this how you cite a printed legal dictionary too, you ask? For paper legal dictionaries cite according to AGLC3 as if it was a book. And remember to always keep an eye on your punctuation.

You can view more referencing hacks from QUT Library and if you need assistance, contact your referencing experts!

Library orientation – Need help?

For help with library services check out the Need help? section of the QUT Library website.

Here you will find information about visiting and contacting the library.

Visit HiQ on campus for library support, including help accessing information, referencing and using library materials.

You can also Chat online with a librarian to have your questions about QUT Library services answered.

Need more help?
Here there are links to Study skills workshops, including library workshops on referencing and researching. For individual assistance with your academic study you can book a Study Solutions consultation.

Winter is here and so is Week One

Although Week One can seem dark and full of terrors it doesn’t have it to be. With some help from QUT Library you can start this semester with confidence and the right tools to succeed.

Here are some of our top tips for getting started on the right foot this semester.

  1. Check out our online learning modules about referencing and finding information. These will help you get on track for your assignments and start the semester well ahead of the White Walkers.
  2. Make sure to stay on top of your readings. Do this by being organised and reading efficiently for university. Top tip – you don’t have to read every word. Our previous blog, Reading at University, gives great advice so you don’t spend your semester swamped by Lannister enemies or in in your readings.
  3. Find your prescribed textbooks at the Library. Search our Classic Catalogue for a unit number to find its prescribed texts. Can’t find an available copy? Request a copy of the book by placing a hold on it or see if it is available through our BONUS+ Catalogue. You could also look for an earlier edition, although make sure to check that the information in the older book is still current and accurate.
  4. And finally, make sure to say hi to the friendly staff at HiQ. They can provide support for all your university needs such as library assistance, IT support and student administration. Unlike Jon Snow, they know a lot!

So start your semester off with a bang, figuratively not Cersei literally, and visit QUT Library.

O Week – What’s happening in the library?

Welcome!

QUT Library offers a range of orientation activities to help you prepare for Semester 2, whether you are new to QUT or returning for another semester.

Library Tours

This tour is much more than a walk around a building because QUT Library is so much more than just a building! Your Library has study spaces, services, resources and people to help you, both at your campus and online. During O Week, library tours are held on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday at Gardens Point and Kelvin Grove. Tours depart from HiQ at:

  • 10am
  • 11am
  • 12pm
  • 1pm
  • 2pm

Referencing made simple

Referencing is an important skill that you must use at uni. This session introduces you to the principles and styles of referencing and citing using QUT cite|write. It also explains how you can paraphrase the work of others, avoid plagiarism, and make sure that your work has academic integrity.

Researching made easy

It’s easy to find information but getting the best scholarly information quickly is a skill. After this session, you will use databases more efficiently to find relevant information and current journal articles for your assignments.

Kelvin Grove Library

We look forward to welcoming you to QUT Library for Semester 2 and if you need help please contact us.

For more information about O Week, check out QUT orientation for students

Referencing Hack #4 – What’s in a numbered reference?

One question we get asked a lot at the library is what are all the parts that make up the reference? This referencing hack breaks down a QUT Numbered reference so that we can fully understand all the components of it.

Here is our example, which is a journal article with DOI (Digital Object Identifier).

And here are what all the parts, separated by different colours, refer to.

Grey – This is the number assigned to the reference in text. These run consecutively with the first reference having the number [1] then the next reference has [2] and so on.

Pink – These are the authors of the journal article.

Light green – This is the title of the journal article.

Light Blue – This is the abbreviated name of the journal that this article was published in.

Orange – The online medium on which you accessed this article. This is usually [Internet].

Dark blue – The year the journal article was published.

Purple – The exact date that you referenced this article in your assignment.

Red – Information about the journal article. The volume number comes first and the issue number (if the article has one) follows in brackets.

Dark green – This refers to the number of computer screens the online resource runs over i.e. roughly how many screens did you scroll through to read the whole article?

Black – This is the URL of the journal article.

Yellow – The DOI [Digital Object Identifier] of the journal article.

These sections can be applied to other examples of numbered referencing also, with perhaps small tweaks. You can view more examples on QUT cite|write. If you need further assistance with understanding your referencing don’t forget you can always contact a referencing expert!

 

Referencing Hack #1 – Edited eBooks

With assignments getting finalised, referencing is high on the To Do list. Over the next week or so we will be sharing our top tips for referencing to make completing your assignment that much easier.

The first tip we want to share is referencing a chapter in an edited eBook with QUT APA. Although there are no specific examples in QUT cite|write on how to do this, we recommend combining the references for Chapter in an Edited Book and Electronic Book (eBook) together. You keep the first half of the Chapter in an edited book example but when you get to the publishing details exchange them for the eBook details including the eBook platform and the URL or DOI for the eBook. Below are 2 examples, from the APA Blog, on how put this all together.

The second example contains a DOI, which is a Digital Object Identifier, and should always be used if available over a standard web address.

Key takeaway – even if you can’t find a specific referencing example for your resource on QUT Cite Write, you can build your own reference using parts from other examples. This goes for many referencing styles! However, if you are unsure about your referencing, you can always contact the library for assistance.

Have a tricky referencing question? Let us know know can add it to our Referencing Hack series!

Study Hack – Academic Honesty, what is it?

What is Academic honesty? You might have heard it referred to as plagiarism or cheating, at QUT we have a huge pile of resources to help you give credit where credit is due and be authentic in your studies.

BelieveOnline_JBSo what do you do if you have a whole bunch of great resources you want to use in your assignment? First off, it is great that you have found some resources relevant to your assignment but remember to have a good look at what your source is and where it came from. You want to use good quality information to back up your ideas and arguments. So make sure you don’t quote any information you haven’t verified!

findingInfoEasy_JB Next, you need to work the information into your assignment. You do this by direct quoting, summarising or paraphrasing their work. Remember, direct quotes should only take up 10% of your word count. Paraphrasing is the hardest but recommended. It is worthwhile aiming for as you can demonstrate your own understanding and show off your critical thinking skills! How to Paraphrase will give you some helpful tips so that you can put your best foot forward.

The final step you need to make is to acknowledge the work of the people whose resources you think are awesome have used in your assignment. Referencing or citing another person’s work is really important and there is loads of information about how to do this on QUT CiteWrite.

To avoid plagiarism make sure you reference and give credit to those who have come before you. And don’t forget, pictures and music need to be referenced too!

Need more help? Come and see us at the Library Help desk. No appointment needed.

Referencing 101 – APA Style tips

It's still puzzling me

In the library we get a lot of questions about referencing – so here are some handy tips to get you on the way with citing in APA Style (remember to check with your tutor or lecturer for what referencing style you need to use in your assignments).

APA (American Psychological Association) is one of the four main referencing styles used at QUT.  It follows what is known as the author-date system and is pretty simple once you figure out the rules.

When gathering information to format your reference you need to think about four key parts:

  1. Author name or organizational body
  2. Date/year the work was published
  3. Title of the work
  4. How/where the work was published

If you can find those four parts of the reference then you are ready to go! It’s just a matter of piecing it all together to fit with the style rules of APA – this means things like knowing when to put titles in italics or where to put a comma.

Example:

Neal, M. J. (2005). Medical pharmacology at a glance (5th ed.). Malden, MA: Blackwell   Publishing.

Queensland Rail. (n.d.). Queensland Rail free wi-fi. Retrieved January 6, 2011, from             www.queenslandrail.com.au/RailServices/City?Pages?wifi.aspx

Look at the above examples, can you recognize each of the four key parts that make up the reference?

If you need some more specific help on the rules of APA style the APA Style Blog is a good resource which answers some of the trickier aspects of APA.

Make sure to always check QUT CiteWrite for examples of how to cite different types of sources.

You can borrow a copy of the APA Style manual (6th edition) from the library

Or, you can ask a librarian through any of our usual contact points.