International Human Rights Day

On Monday 10 December we celebrate International Human Rights Day.  While it will be celebrated in different ways by different people, the message around the world is the same.

This year the Universal Declaration of Human Rights turns 70.  The document, which proclaimed the inalienable right to which all human beings are entitled — regardless of race, colour, religion, sex, language, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status, is the most translated in the world.

A really lovely representation of these principals, and a great way to share them with a younger audience is the illustrated edition of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.  It’s published by the United Nations in Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian, and Spanish.

QUT is heavily involved in research into the area of human rights. Here’s some of our most recently published works about the current challenges and issues in the area — available in QUT’s ePrints repository.

O’Brien, Erin (2019) Challenging the Human Trafficking Narrative: Victims, Villains, and Heroes. 

Kauli, Jackie & Thomas, Verena (2018) Communicating the law: A participatory communication toolkit for human rights defenders in Papua New Guinea. 

Huggins, Anna & Lewis, Bridget (2018) The Paris Agreement: Development, the North-South divide and human rights. 

 

 

 

 

A Portrait of the Artist: Nick Earls on William Robinson

Prolific Brisbane novelist and short-story writer Nick Earls has turned to non-fiction to celebrate one of Australia’s most significant living artists in William Robinson: A new perspective.

Commissioned by QUT’s William Robinson Gallery at Gardens Point Campus, Earls’ enlightening and often humorous chronicle of Robinson’s life and work comes in an attractive hardcover edition, available at the Gallery and at the QUT Bookshop.

William Robinson: A new perspective was launched in tandem with the Gallery’s currently showing Nature Imagined exhibition, featuring Robinson’s visionary renderings of the landscapes of South East Queensland.

For a more interactive experience,The Cube (Gardens Point Campus) is displaying selected Robinson landscapes digitised at high resolution, allowing you to zoom in on the details and gain insights into his techniques.

Want to learn more about William Robinson and his work? Keen to sample some of Nick Earls’ fiction? The QUT Library is an invaluable resource.

 

The Invincible Spirit of Queenslanders (Portrayed through their built environment) – 100 Years of ANZAC

11 November (Remembrance Day) 2018 marks the 100th anniversary of the signing of the Armistice – the agreement that led to the end of the First World War (1914-1918).

The Cube at QUT Gardens Point is hosting a free digital exhibition from 2-11 November to commemorate the Queensland soldiers and families who answered the call from the British to join the First World War. It incorporates their stories and images to bring to life their journey to the front, repatriation and the return home.

There are also stories of events and places that helped to shape Queensland to be the place it is today. More information is available at http://www.thecube.qut.edu.au/cube-screens/2018/anzac.php?short.

There is also a curated display in Old Government House at Gardens Point from 11 October to 11 January 2019 and is also free. http://www.ogh.qut.edu.au/whats-on/2018/invincible-spirit.php

On the 11 November, there are events all over the country and state that you can attend to show your support. Find out more at https://anzac100.initiatives.qld.gov.au/.

QUT Libraries have a whole host of material on the First World War if you want to do your own investigations. For the school teachers among you, there are kits available to share with your classes.

Lest we forget.

The Invincible Spirit of Queenslanders - Portrayed through their built environment.

The Invincible Spirit of Queenslanders – Portrayed through their built environment

October is for Mental Health

There is a lot going on in October!

  • Queensland Mental Health Week 6-14 October  
  • World Mental Health Day 10th of October
  • Mental Health Month

Did you know?

1 in 5 Australians are affected by mental illness, yet many don’t seek help because of stigma.

We can all do something to help shed a more positive light on mental health.

Here are some links to the various events that have loads of helpful practical information for you or someone you know.

Queensland Mental Health Week

World Mental Health Day

Mental Health Month

 

 

Proud to celebrate Pride

QUT Library is celebrating Pride month with a display of LGBTIQA+ literature at Kelvin Grove library.

We have a selection of LGBTIQA+ children’s and young adult literature in our collection and many of our librarians are members of QUT’s Ally Network.

Allies are QUT staff trained to understand sexuality and gender issues and to provide ‘safe zones’, support and referral for staff and students who identify as LGBTIQA+.

At this weekend’s Brisbane Pride Rally & march QUT staff, students and supporters will be marching under a University Unity banner. Join with your work mates, friends or family and march to demonstrate acceptance, unity, inclusivity and support for the LGBTIQA+ community.

The parade kicks off at 10am on Saturday 22 September 2018. Gather from 9:30am at Brunswick Street between Ann Street and McLachlan Street. After some short speeches, the march will make its way down Brunswick Street through the Valley to New Farm Park, and the Fair Day festivities.

 

 

Australian Reading Hour

Australian Reading Hour

What is Australian Reading Hour? Australian Reading Hour is an initiative supported by the Australian Government, Better Reading and the Copyright Agency Cultural Fund to encourage all Australians across the country to pick up a book and read for one hour on your own or with your children. It is being driven by libraries all across Australia to promote the benefits of reading.

What are the benefits of reading? Well, it helps to increase literacy and numeracy skills and has a positive and significant effect on your work. Reading reduces stress by 68%, relieving stress more quickly than listening to music, going for a walk or having a cup of tea, and we all know that tea fixes everything 😉. The more leisure books people read, the more literate they become and the more prosperous and equitable the society they live in becomes. Reading a gripping novel causes positive biological changes in the brain that can last for days. Who knew that indulging in your fave author or book genre could have a positive effect on society and yourself? When tested for empathy, readers of narrative fiction achieved significantly higher than other groups. With a bit more empathy, our world would be a more harmonious place to live.

Children who know adults who read for pleasure take it for granted that reading is valuable and reading is closely linked to increasing our understanding of our own identities. It was found by the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research that reading to children six to seven days a week puts them almost a year ahead of those who are not being read to. So reading to children and encouraging them to read is setting them up for success in life. Isn’t that what every parent wants?

Sounds good. When is it? It’s on Thursday September 20 2018, and the hour and reading material are your choice. Find more information and to register your interest on their website, go to  https://www.readinghour.org.au/.

I don’t have a book to read for leisure at the moment. Do QUT Libraries have anything? Yes! QUT Libraries have more than just your textbooks. There are great fiction novels in print and online, for adults and children. Check Quick Find today.

But I prefer non-fiction. That’s okay. QUT Libraries have that covered too. We have autobiographies, biographies, commentaries, self-help books plus a whole lot more. The choice is yours! 😊

Don’t forget, when searching in Quick Find, you can limit your results to books and ebooks only.

It’s Ekka time!

The Royal Queensland Show (Ekka) runs from 10-19th August this year.

For ten days, the Ekka brings together people from the country and city to celebrate agriculture.

Interested in learning more about agriculture, why not explore QUT Library’s collection?

Here are some resources you may like to check out…

Looking for current research in this subject area? Try searching QUT ePrints!
QUT ePrints is an online collection of scholarly publications, higher degree theses and other research outputs produced by QUT staff and postgraduate students. All records can be accessed by the public and a large proportion include a free-to-read copy of the full-text.

QUT Library will be open on the Royal Queensland Show Public Holiday on Wednesday 15th August:

  • Gardens Point and Kelvin Grove Libraries will be open 9am-5pm
  • QUT Law Library will be open 10am-5pm
  • Online Chat will be available from 9am-5pm

See our opening hours for more information.

Paperbark: First Nation Narratives with Dr Anita Heiss

QUT Murri-Ailan Way is proud to present Paperbark: First Nation Narratives with Dr Anita Heiss.

Dr Heiss is a member of the Wiradjuri nation of central New South Wales and is one of Australia’s most prolific and well-known authors of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander literature.

A poet, satirist and social commentator, Dr Heiss will be speaking about her work and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander pioneers in literature who have inspired her next Wednesday 8 August at QUT Kelvin Grove Library next week (SOLD OUT see below for waiting list email).

If you didn’t manage to get a ticket, we have a number of Dr Heiss’s books available to borrow from the QUT Library including:

Avoiding Mr Right (2008) Offered the professional opportunity of a lifetime, Peta leaves her coastal life and doting boyfriend James in Sydney for a 12 month stint in the ‘fashion capital of Australia’.

 

 

Am I black enough for you? (2012) Anita Heiss gives a first-hand account of her experiences as a woman with an Aboriginal mother and Austrian father, and explains the development of her activist consciousness. Read her story and ask: what does it take for someone to be black enough for you?

 

I’m not racist but– : a collection of social observations.  (2017) This collection of social observations, thoughts and conversations will challenge the reader to consider issues of imposed and real Aboriginal identity, the process of reconciliation and issues around saying ‘sorry’, notions of ‘truth’ and integrity, biculturalism and invisible whiteness, entrenched racism and political correctness.

 

 

Please email:   k.csatlos@qut.edu.au to go on to the waiting list for this event

 

 

 

 

QUT Open Day 2018

QUT Open Day is this Sunday the 29th July, and it’s the perfect opportunity to explore everything happening at QUT, whether you’re a prospective student or currently studying here.

  • talk to staff and students from all faculties and study areas
    (including courses based at Kelvin Grove campus)
  • go to information sessions
  • explore the facilities at Gardens Point campus

While you’re visiting QUT, why not catch a free shuttle bus to Kelvin Grove?
There will be tours of the campus and facilities, including the Library and HiQ.
Buses will run every 15 minutes from 8am to 3.45pm

A visit to QUT Library is highly recommended!
  • Join a tour of the Law Library and courtrooms. The QUT Law Library provides specialised legal information, resources and access to highly qualified law librarians. You’ll find the Law Library on Level 5 of C Block, Gardens Point campus
  • Explore Gardens Point Library (V Block, Gardens Point campus) and Kelvin Grove Library (R Block, Kelvin Grove campus) where you can take a 15 minute guided tour of the Library and HiQ.

For more details, check out the QUT Open Day Program and create your own customised day plan for all of the seminars and tours you’d like to attend.