National Science Week and Robotronica

From 10th to 18th August, science and technology take to the streets for National Science Week.

Established in 1997, this annual celebration of science and technology acknowledges the contributions of Australian scientists to the world, and encourages members of the general public to engage with science in all its forms.

There will be hundreds of nationwide events, including many free activities, talks, workshops, and live shows.

UQ Demotroupe

Free events include:

  • VR immersive experiences. Explore beneath the sea or beyond the stars simply by putting on a slightly odd pair of goggles.
  • Public lectures. Listen to astrophysicists, meteorologists, and other science luminaries explain the mysteries of the universe from a scientific standpoint.
  • Scinema International Science Film Festival. Watch science films from around the world, screening in various locations around Queensland.
  • Children’s activities. Introduce your kids to the joys of chemistry, Lego boats, and aeroelastic flutter bees.

CoralWatch Community at Brisbane Science FestivalAnd no celebration of science and technology would be complete without quite a few robots. Speaking of which, the Robotronica robotics and technology festival, coming hot on the heels of National Science Week, will take place on 18th August at QUT Gardens Point campus. QUT Library will be part of the action: if you’re keen to experience Virtual and Augmented Reality, the Library is the place to be. Drop in: it’s free!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Perils & pitfalls for early career researchers

Predatory publishing continues to be a trap for young players with more and more early  career researchers falling victim.  When this happens, not only do they effectively lose ownership and copyright of their hard work (with that the ability to publish it elsewhere), they often lose confidence, they can lose standing in their field, and they most certainly lose the potential for their research to be cited and shared with other researchers and future collaborators.

Looking for a publisher for your research should be a more of an experience like buying a new laptop or a car.  Hopefully you don’t buy the first shiny thing you see.  Hopefully you rely on people whose opinion you respect.  Hopefully you check out the product reviews and comparison websites to see what your options are.   Hopefully you don’t send a cash deposit after receiving a spam email from a car dealer.

Your diligence when looking for a potential publisher should likewise be seen as an investment in your future.  Look to the journals the experts in your field are publishing in.  Look to the journals your peers are publishing in.  As an early career researcher, reputable journals will not send you email invitations to publish with them so don’t be tempted by vanity publishers.  Don’t let your desperation for publication override your common sense.

Follow the Think Check Submit protocols.  If you are still not certain, ask your faculty or liaison librarian to help you.

Predatory conferences, like predatory journals can also be difficult to spot, and without due diligence you can end up at a dodgy hotel, in a scary part of town, signing your authorship rights away and delivering a paper to six people, who will likely be the only people who ever hear about your research.  You can check the Pivot database on the QUT Library’s databases page for legitimate calls for submissions for conference papers.

Think Check Submit