Authorship, Publication and Peer Review training

QUT Library and the Office of Research Ethics and Integrity (OREI) are once again offering training sessions for HDR students and Early Career Researchers on Authorship and Publication and Journal Peer Review.

Session 1: Monday 13 May 2019 – 9.30am – 11.30am         

Authorship and Publication will cover the fundamentals of publishing in a series of tight 3 minute talks and videos. Topics to be covered include:

  • Developing a Data Management Plan
  • Open Scholarship Practices: Open Access
  • Originality and plagiarism
  • Promoting your work

Session 2: Tuesday 14 May 2019 – 1.00pm – 2.30pm

Journal Peer Review will cover different aspects of journal peer review. We will have speakers covering various topics along with videos. Topics to be covered include:

  • Forms of peer review
  • Conducting peer review
  • Responding to peer review
  • Emerging trends in peer review

Follow the links to register for one or both sessions.

Sign up for Session 1:  Authorship & Publication (watch short video) – Monday 13 May 2019 – 9.30am – 11.30am

Sign up for Session 2: Journal Peer Review (watch short video) – Tuesday 14 May 2019 – 1.00pm – 2.30pm

Feedback from previous participants:

  • This was a great session. I learnt more about the publishing process this morning than I have in [my] whole time at [university].  I will be recommending [this] session to all early career academics. 
  • A well organised, succinct morning.  The format was great – moved along well and didn’t get bogged down …. All speakers were well prepared and their slides were clear and concise. 
  • I would like to thank and congratulate the team for the organisation of both seminars! They were great!  Excellent topics and speakers!!! The videos were great too! Thank you so much for the opportunity of learning such important topics and for having many doubts clarified.  You are the best!
  • The format was great, and I found the structuring of the whole session around the map very helpful.
  • Both workshops were excellent, I got so much out of them and all the information was just perfect…. Short presentations from a variety of speakers who were all so engaging.  These were some of the best run and most informative workshops I have done with QUT, thank you.                                                                                                                                                                 

SAGE Higher Degree Research Student Publication Prize

SAGE Publishing is offering cash prizes ($1500 First Prize, $900 Second Prize and $500 Third Prize) for the top three papers accepted for publication, by a Higher Degree Research (HDR) student.

You have until 19th July 2019 to enter, so sharpen those pencils! The awards will go to HDR students who are the lead author on a manuscript judged to be among the top three papers, and accepted by a peer reviewed journal, with a Q1 or Q2 ranking in Scimago or Journal Citation Reports.  The paper must have been accepted for publication between the 1st December 2018 and 30th June 2019.

Papers will be judged according to the following criteria:

  • The originality of the research
  • Readability: The paper is well written and easy to understand
  • Contribution of the applicant to the publication.

To be eligible to enter, you must:

  1. Be a current QUT Higher Degree Research (HDR) Student (QUT MOPP).
  2. Be the lead author and have played a significant role in data collection, data analysis, and preparation of a manuscript accepted for publication in a refereed (peer-reviewed) journal, allocated a Quartile 1 (Q1) or Quartile 2 (Q2) (ranking in Scimago  or Journal Citation Reports in any subject area, between 1st December 2018 and 30th June 2019.
  3. Email library.research@qut.edu.au to advise of manuscript acceptance and publication details by 19th July 2019.

You’ve already done the hard work of writing the paper; enter now with the chance to further highlight your research!

For the full terms and conditions and to apply, click here. If you’d like more information contact library.research@qut.edu.au.

International Human Rights Day

On Monday 10 December we celebrate International Human Rights Day.  While it will be celebrated in different ways by different people, the message around the world is the same.

This year the Universal Declaration of Human Rights turns 70.  The document, which proclaimed the inalienable right to which all human beings are entitled — regardless of race, colour, religion, sex, language, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status, is the most translated in the world.

A really lovely representation of these principals, and a great way to share them with a younger audience is the illustrated edition of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.  It’s published by the United Nations in Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian, and Spanish.

QUT is heavily involved in research into the area of human rights. Here’s some of our most recently published works about the current challenges and issues in the area — available in QUT’s ePrints repository.

O’Brien, Erin (2019) Challenging the Human Trafficking Narrative: Victims, Villains, and Heroes. 

Kauli, Jackie & Thomas, Verena (2018) Communicating the law: A participatory communication toolkit for human rights defenders in Papua New Guinea. 

Huggins, Anna & Lewis, Bridget (2018) The Paris Agreement: Development, the North-South divide and human rights. 

 

 

 

 

Perils & pitfalls for early career researchers

Predatory publishing continues to be a trap for young players with more and more early  career researchers falling victim.  When this happens, not only do they effectively lose ownership and copyright of their hard work (with that the ability to publish it elsewhere), they often lose confidence, they can lose standing in their field, and they most certainly lose the potential for their research to be cited and shared with other researchers and future collaborators.

Looking for a publisher for your research should be a more of an experience like buying a new laptop or a car.  Hopefully you don’t buy the first shiny thing you see.  Hopefully you rely on people whose opinion you respect.  Hopefully you check out the product reviews and comparison websites to see what your options are.   Hopefully you don’t send a cash deposit after receiving a spam email from a car dealer.

Your diligence when looking for a potential publisher should likewise be seen as an investment in your future.  Look to the journals the experts in your field are publishing in.  Look to the journals your peers are publishing in.  As an early career researcher, reputable journals will not send you email invitations to publish with them so don’t be tempted by vanity publishers.  Don’t let your desperation for publication override your common sense.

Follow the Think Check Submit protocols.  If you are still not certain, ask your faculty or liaison librarian to help you.

Predatory conferences, like predatory journals can also be difficult to spot, and without due diligence you can end up at a dodgy hotel, in a scary part of town, signing your authorship rights away and delivering a paper to six people, who will likely be the only people who ever hear about your research.  You can check the Pivot database on the QUT Library’s databases page for legitimate calls for submissions for conference papers.

Think Check Submit

 

Peer Review Week 2018

www.peerreviewweek.org

What is Peer Review Week?

This week focuses on the important place peer review has in scholarly communications and in maintaining scientific quality. This year’s theme is ‘diversity and inclusion in peer review’ and provides a chance for individuals, institutions, and organisations to spread the word that good peer review helps ensure quality and credibility in academic publications. For more information about this event, including online webinars, visit the Peer Review Week website.

What is the peer review process?

Peer review is the evaluation of scientific, academic, or professional work by others working in the same field. Scholarly journals use peer review as a quality-control mechanism. Consequently, articles published in a peer reviewed journal have higher status than articles published in journals which do not use peer review.

If you are not sure if a journal is peer reviewed, look at the section of the journal web page where information for authors is provided. Alternatively, search the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory database by the name of the journal. If there is a referee jersey symbol (Refereed) in the ‘Refereed’ column it means the journal is peer reviewed.

If you’re interested in being a peer reviewer, see Publons’ Peer Review Resources. By creating a Publons profile (e.g. Adrian Barnett’s profile) you can get credit for the reviews you’ve completed and attract the attention of journal editors looking for reviewers.

Looking for peer-reviewed journal articles in Quick Find?

You can search for articles in QUT Library’s Quick Find (just enter your search terms, tick the peer reviewed box and click search). You can also filter your results in Quick Find to show only peer reviewed. For more information or if you need help finding quality peer reviewed articles, contact QUT Library.

Wikipedia Editing Workshop

17 years ago, Jimmy Wales and Larry Sanger started Wikipedia and today, it’s one of the most popular websites in the world. It’s visited on average over 41 billion times a month! (Wikimedia Statistics 2018).

Are you one of those 41 billion visitors? Have you read something on Wikipedia and thought, ‘That’s not right! Someone should fix that’. You can be the one to ‘fix that’ and set the world right – learn how by attending a QUT Library Wikipedia Editing Workshop.

It’s a great opportunity for academics, HDR students and Research Support staff to engage with your research area using Wikipedia. In the workshop, you’ll practice writing for a general audience and contribute to Wikipedia by checking, verifying or adding information in your area of research or interest.

Join Wikipedia and make a profile before arriving, then put your editing skills into practice when you get here.

It’ll be held in QUT Library in conjunction with State Library of Queensland’s #QWiki Club.

3 September 12-1.30pm

QUT Kelvin Grove Campus, R306

image of a man and woman looking at an underwater seascape in the background. Overlaid with text about the wikipedia editing workshop

Book in to the Wikipedia Editing Workshop

It’s Ekka time!

The Royal Queensland Show (Ekka) runs from 10-19th August this year.

For ten days, the Ekka brings together people from the country and city to celebrate agriculture.

Interested in learning more about agriculture, why not explore QUT Library’s collection?

Here are some resources you may like to check out…

Looking for current research in this subject area? Try searching QUT ePrints!
QUT ePrints is an online collection of scholarly publications, higher degree theses and other research outputs produced by QUT staff and postgraduate students. All records can be accessed by the public and a large proportion include a free-to-read copy of the full-text.

QUT Library will be open on the Royal Queensland Show Public Holiday on Wednesday 15th August:

  • Gardens Point and Kelvin Grove Libraries will be open 9am-5pm
  • QUT Law Library will be open 10am-5pm
  • Online Chat will be available from 9am-5pm

See our opening hours for more information.

New business models for creative outputs

By Nerida Quatermass

In creative life, many things motivate us to share. Sharing has many benefits. An obvious benefit in a traditional business model is a sale of work. But sharing creativity is also about engagement with your community. Engagement can be difficult to achieve in a world chock a block full of creative content.

Creators are exploring new models for engagement. Interested?

The free eBook Made with Creative Commons showcases some extra-ordinary examples of creators who share their works incorporating licensing under Creative commons licences. It’s still possible to sell your work! As an example, think Cards against Humanity.

The case studies in the book exemplify the power of sharing, which is a defining value of the  Creative Commons movement:

The power of the open licences to maximise innovation.

The power of case studies to provide a guided transition to incorporating Creative Commons in open business models.

The publication of the book itself is a great story about the power of community as the book was crowd-funded on Kickstarter.

In addition to accewaterdropsssing the eBook there are a number of ways that you can get hold of a copy of this book to keep.

(Made with Creative Commons. Cover design by Klaus Nielsen, vinterstille.dk)

(Photo by Linus Nylund on Unsplash)

 

 

Love Data Week Guest blogger: Barriers to open data sharing

The 2014 Ebola outbreak mobilized groups of researchers across the world to sequence viral genomes and share data providing information crucial to “designing effective diagnostics, vaccines and antibody-based therapies” [1].  However uncertainties around ownership of data, intellectual property rights, patient consent and poor management of data all make access to the source of truth very difficult and often essential data is not available to research community working on epidemics.    QUT PhD candidate Anisa Rowhani-Farid, from the School of Public Health and Social Work, discusses some of these barriers to open data sharing in her guest blog today. 

[1]    Yozwiak, N. L., Schaffner, S. F., Sabeti, P. C.: Data sharing: Make outbreak research open access. Nature, 2015, 518:477–479, doi:10.1038/518477a

My desire to pursue research in this field began when I was a junior bench scientist some 10 years ago, conducting anti-malarial drug research. I was confronted with the commercial aspect of scientific research.  I learned about the institutional arrangements between industry, academia, the community, or “consumers”.  I also learned about how intellectual property, patents, and funding arrangements play a critical yet limiting role in contributing to the advancement of scientific knowledge.

Anisa Rowhani-Farid

PhD Candidate Anisa Rowhani-Farid

It became clear to me that scientific research is driven and, more often than not, pressured by the funding available from government and industry, and that these relationships are primarily based on the conception that scientific knowledge is generated through research that views knowledge as a commodity, distributed at a cost to other researchers and most importantly, populations that might need open access to that knowledge.

As I read more, I wondered what happened to all the public money that was spent on health and medical research. I read Chalmers and Glasziou’s (2009) paper on research waste, as well as the series that was published in the Lancet in 2014 called ‘Research: increasing value, reducing waste’.  I learned that around 85% of the world’s spending on health and medical research is wasted per year, and a contributing factor was that the findings of medical studies cannot be reproduced by other researchers and so seemingly successful medical breakthroughs are thus unverifiable [1, 2]. This reproducibility crisis in health and medical research made me think of the way in which scientific knowledge progresses.  I was fascinated by the paper written by John Ioannidis in 2005 where he concluded through simulations that most published findings in the scientific discourse are false and misleading [3, 4].

If most of what is claimed in the scientific literature is false, and if scientists are adopting malpractices because of the pressure to commercialise so-called ‘medical breakthroughs’, then how deep will the cultural change have to be for scientists to conduct high-quality research with integrity, and share all their findings, positive or negative? This question has motivated my doctorate of philosophy.

  1. Chalmers I, Glasziou P: Avoidable waste in the production and reporting of research evidence. The Lancet 2009, 374(9683):86-89.
  2. Chalmers I, Bracken M, Djulbegovic B, Garattini S, Grant J, Gülmezoglu M, Howells D, Ioannidis J, Oliver S: How to increase value and reduce waste when research priorities are set. The Lancet 2014, 383(9912):156-165.
  3. Ioannidis J: How to Make More Published Research True. PLoS Med 2014, 11(10):e1001747.
  4. Ioannidis JPA: Why Most Published Research Findings Are False. PLOS Medicine 2005, 2(8):e124.

Watch this video (YouTube 2m8s) from Anisa Rowhani-Farid and follow her @AnisaFarid on Twitter.

Anisa Rowhani-Farid (YouTube video, 2m8s)If you’re a researcher, we’d love to hear from you.  Leave a comment below on your data story.

Visit the Love Data Week blog each day for stories, resources and activities and if you would like to join the conversation via Twitter #lovedata18 #qutlibrary

 

Love Data Week 2018

It’s Love Data Week!

From the 12th to the 16th of February, along with other academic and research libraries, data archives and organisations, QUT Library is celebrating the value and importance of research data, which we believe are the foundation of the scholarly record and crucial for advancing our knowledge of the world around us.

The theme for the 2018 social media event is ‘data stories’ including :

Stories about data
Telling stories with data
Connected conversations
We are data

Anisa Rowhani-Farid, from the School of Public Health and Social Work, Faculty of Health who’s completing a PhD Towards a culture of open science and data sharing in health and medical research at QUT has this to say about data and reproducible science:

Efforts are underway by the global meta-research community to strengthen the reliability of the scientific method [1].  Data sharing is an indispensable part of the movement towards science that is open; where scientific truth is not a questionable commodity, but is easily accessible, replicable, and verifiable [2].  The cultural shift towards reproducible science is complex and it calls for a twofold change in the attitudes of individual researchers toward reproducibility, and the leadership provided by the systems and services that support scientific research.  As such, journals, universities, government bodies, and funders are key players in promoting this culture.  Transparency and reproducibility are elements central to strengthening the scientific method, and data provides the key to scientific truth [3].”

 

  1. Ioannidis JPA, Fanelli D, Dunne DD, Goodman SN: Meta-research: Evaluation and Improvement of Research Methods and Practices. PLoS Biol 2015, 13(10):e1002264.
  2. Reproducibility and reliability of biomedical research: improving research practice. In.: The Academy of Medical Sciences; 2015.
  3. Iqbal SA, Wallach JD, Khoury MJ, Schully SD, Ioannidis JPA: Reproducible Research Practices and Transparency across the Biomedical Literature. PLoS Biol 2016, 14(1):e1002333.

If you’re a researcher, leave a comment below on your data story.

Visit the Love Data Week blog each day for stories, resources and activities and if you would like to join the conversation via Twitter #lovedata18  @qutlibrary