Summer is almost here – Let’s go!

Alexandra Headlands BeachYou’ve worked hard all year and the time is right to take a break from work, study and perhaps even the summer heat.

Personally, I love the summer – the long hot days and the balmy summer nights but I also love getting out of the City and heading to the beach. My favourite place to escape to is the Sunshine Coast with its gorgeous white sandy beaches and enticing blue waters. Just remember to swim between the flags and ‘slip, slop, slap, seek and slide’! Glasshouse Mountains

For those of you not so enamoured with the beach, the Sunshine Coast Hinterland can be absolutely breathtaking and a cooler area than the coast. Mary Cairncross Park has spectacular views across to the Glasshouse Mountains and beyond. They have a museum and environmental education section as well to learn about all the fabulous flora and fauna in this remarkable area.

The Gold Coast has its own natural beauty with its beautiful beaches and luscious hinterland as well as the added attraction of the theme parks for those adventure seekers.

If you’re looking to go a little further afield, why not check out our collection of travel guides at Kelvin Grove Library. There are online versions of some of the guides too so you can access them wherever you are (with an internet connection of course 😊).

What ever you do or wherever you go we wish you a safe and restful holiday break.

GIF IT UP

GIF IT UP is an annual gif-making competition for the most creative reuse of digitised cultural heritage material. This year’s 6th edition is run by Europeana in close cooperation with Digital Public Library of AmericaDigital NZ and Trove.

QUT Library Digital Collections has three submissions created from digitised cultural heritage material.

If you like our gifs please vote for us!

  1. Click here to view OUR gif

    Source material: 1. Territet-Glion funicular railway; 2. Children’s party in the grounds of the Herston residence, Coralyn, ca. 1907| Robert Augustus Henry L’Estrange; 3. Glasshouse mtns Beerwah, 1894
    | Queensland University of Technology via Trove
    The images used by this GIF are sourced from Queensland University of Technology Digital Collections. The Territet–Glion funicular railway image is a postcard from Montreaux, Switzerland and the photo with the young ladies are from the L’Estrange collection. The mountain in the background is one of the Glasshouse mountain images from the QUT Stories collection.

  2. Click here to view our gif

    Source material: Unknown people in horse drawn cart and coachman; possibly Chester, England (Bache Hall) Inside grocery shop possibly Kelvin Grove Queensland Harrison’s jams and jellies display | Robert Augustus Henry L’Estrange | Queensland University of Technology

  3. click here to view our gif

    Source material: Shot putterInside grocery shop possibly Kelvin Grove QueenslandHarrison’s jams and jellies display | Robert Augustus Henry L’Estrange | Queensland University of Technology via Trove

You can view all entries here at GIF IT UP

 

Mo Can Do

Thinking of growing a moustache? November, or Movember, is the ideal time, as your mo can play an important role in promoting men’s health (it can look good, too).

Conceived in Melbourne in 2003 to raise funds for prostate cancer research, Movember is now an international movement and the leading global organisation tackling prostate cancer, testicular cancer, and male suicide and other mental health issues.

Not thinking of growing a moustache? There are other ways you can take part in Movember to help men live happier, healthier, longer lives.

If you’re interested in learning more about the history of Movember, watch this entertaining TED Talk by the movement’s co-founder Adam Garone – just one of numerous moustache-related resources available through QUT Library.

 

November 11 is Remembrance Day

November 11 is Remembrance Day, which commemorates those who lost their lives in war, conflict and military service for Australia.

Traditionally, a silence is observed at 11am on the 11th of November, which comes from the “the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month”: the time and date that the armistice between the Allies and Germany ended the First World War in 1918.

Remembrance Day is also observed in other nations, sometimes by another name like Memorial Day or Veterans Day.  The day is observed in the USA, Commonwealth countries including Canada, New Zealand, South Africa and many Caribbean nations, France, Belgium and Serbia.

Originally known as Armistice Day, Remembrance Day was first meant to commemorate those who died in WWI. But since WWII, the day came to include people who had died in later wars too.

Remembrance Day traditions generally focus on members of the armed forces and military who died in conflict, but other people may be commemorated too. Casualties of conflict or peacekeeping missions include civilian nurses and medical staff, members of auxiliary services (including women’s auxiliaries), humanitarian volunteers, war correspondents and police officers assisting in peacekeeping activities.

Red poppy flowers are used in Remembrance Day traditions, and are a common symbol of commemoration of those killed in conflict. Red poppies grew in the churned-up soil of the Western Front in WWI, and their bright red colour eerily evoked the spilled blood of fallen soldiers.

Remembrance Day ceremonies commonly include the Last Post bugle call, which was used on the battlefield to announce the end of the day’s activities and the time for sleep. It is now also used at remembrance ceremonies and military funerals to signify that the soldier’s duty has ended and they can rest in peace.

Take a moment to view the display at the Kelvin Grove Library on level 3 (pictured above) and feel free to borrow any displayed items.

Get your game on!

International Games Week 2019 - November 3-9 It’s time for International Games Week (IGW). IGW is an initiative “…around the world to reconnect communities through their libraries around the educational, recreational, and social value of all types of games.” https://games.ala.org/international-games-week/

Personally, I love playing games. Not with people’s feelings and emotions, but with a board and some tokens or some cards, or a bat and ball. I like games I play on my mobile device too, but not as much as the ones I play face to face. I love the strategizing where I’m trying to be the best zombie killer, the cooperative games where I’m helping to stop a pandemic from wiping out the world and the storyteller, who’s taking my character through a series of challenges imagined by the castle-master. I enjoy the team games like Pictionary or Charades that test my creativity and quick thinking and the more active ones like table tennis (I know that this is an Olympic sport, but the way my friends and I play, it’s a game) or Marco Polo (for those of you who don’t know what this is, see here for a definition/rules for game play). I’m not always the best player but I’m always willing to have a go.

QUT Library gets involved in the action too. At all the Libraries there are games to help you get your mind off your exam prep, relax a little and enjoy a bit of socialisation, ready for the next study session. The Law Library has chess, KG Library has giant Jenga and table tennis (Ping Pong) and GP Library has table tennis too! If the digital games really are more your thing, you can borrow Xbox or Playstation games to take home or use the Games Lab if you’re at KG Library. See which games are available in Library Search.  So get your game on and get those endorphins flowing!