World Book Day, Yay!

On the 23rd April get off Netflix and grab yourself a book. Not just because you know you should, but to celebrate our freedom to do just that.

It is our duty then, everywhere in the world, to protect these freedoms and to promote reading and writing in order to fight illiteracy and poverty and to strengthen the foundations of peace, as well as to protect the publishing-related professions and professionals.

It’s World Book Day, so time to think about how books make our lives better.  The Director General of UNESCO Audrey Azoulay tells us that when we celebrate books, we celebrate everything that comes  with them like writing, reading, translating and publishing. 

We like to think we do the same here at  QUT Library, and we have hundreds of thousands of books and eBooks, so why not borrow a classic, take on a new genre, or delve into something you’ve always wanted to explore?

Here are some suggestions from your friendly librarians:

Improve those negotiation skills with Getting to yes by Roger Fisher, William Ury & Bruce M Paton.

If you don’t have the time for a global odyssey enjoy someone else’s try Lights out in Wonderland by DBC Pierre.

If you want to read the book before you see the movie try The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society.

If you want to sharpen up those English grammar skills try Grammar for grown-ups : everything you need to know but never learnt in school

If you like botany and historical novels try The Signature of All Things by Elizabeth Gilbert.

World Book Day isn’t just about books it’s about Copyright too, and QUT Library has this great guide to all things copyright.

 

 

 

 

 

New look Quick Find!

The new look Quick Find on the Library website can now be personalised just for you. Alongside your favourite features, you’ll find the following new functionality:

  • Permanently save your favourite items and search history to My Favourites.
  • Easily filter search results to show only online material or use the ‘Available in hardcopy’ filter to show only physical items.
  • Search for your unit code and find a link to your QUT Readings list.
  • Find more links to related articles in search results for peer-reviewed articles, like those on a similar topic, articles from the reference list or articles that have cited the paper.
  • Use the new browse items search to easily find your textbook or find books by a certain author.
  • Easily check if the Library has access to a specific journal using the new ‘Find a journal’ search.
  • Request scans of print journals and chapters of books held in the Library from within search results.
  • See your current loans and requests displayed in a more user-friendly way in the new-look ‘My loans and holds’, making it easy to check current loans, view hold and scan requests, or see any Library messages.
  • Automatic renewal of items on loan the end of the loan period (up to five times, unless recalled).

Visit QUT Library’s website for information about the new Quick Find search.

We’d love to know what you think about the new Quick Find, let us know your feedback or suggestions

 

On your marks, get set, GO!

The Commonwealth Games are on at the Gold Coast from 4th April – 18th April. Even though we are up in Brisbane we still need to expect changes to our commute to and from QUT, at both campuses! You can find all the details about what changes to expect from your train, bus, car or bike journeys at Get Set for the Games.

The Commonwealth Games do coincide with our extra-long mid semester break so you might not be coming to campus as often. But have no fear, you can access many library resources from the comfort of your own home. While you are keeping an eye on the marathon you can chat to a librarian about any of your borrowing, referencing or assignment questions. Or, whilst an exciting high jump competition is underway have a look at our How to Find guides. Want to watch all the swimming races you can but still need to find information for your assignments? No problems! Use the Library’s Quickfind search to find books, journal articles and conference papers or use one our many databases and specialised search tools to find the perfect article or set of statistics! And if you need any further assistance you can always contact HiQ.

Now you are all set to enjoy all the upcoming sporting events you want plus keep up to date to all your studies. Talk about winning!

Easter Opening Hours

Easter is fast approaching, as is semester break. This is a great time to relax but to also get a head start on the second half of the semester. The Library and HiQ are here to help you with that! During the Easter Break Kelvin Grove, Gardens Point, and Law Libraries will be open, here are all the full details –

Friday 31st March – Closed

Saturday 1st April – Open 9am-5pm

Sunday 2nd April – Open 9am-5pm

Monday 3rd April – Open 9am-5pm

The Law Library will be open from Saturday to Monday also but from 10am-5pm.

If you can’t make it into campus you can also chat to HiQ online.

After the public holidays our normal opening hours will resume. From everyone at QUT Library we hope you all have a happy and safe long weekend!

Cite it!

QUT cite|write is your go to guide for citing and referencing at QUT. Four referencing styles are covered in this guide: APA, Harvard, Legal and Vancouver. The style you use will depend on the faculty you’re in and your lecturer’s preference. Check out the “Getting started” section for an overview of your style.

QUT Library is offering workshops on referencing in weeks five and six. They are now open for booking!

Practical referencing workshops

Ever had trouble working out exactly what it is that you’re trying to reference? Still not sure where to find all the bits and pieces you need to create a reference? This workshop will help you get more familiar with different types of resources and how to reference them, including articles, websites, reports, ebooks and more. The APA and Harvard styles are demonstrated.

It will be assumed you know the basics of referencing, so view the short Referencing Made Simple lesson before the workshop. You can also revisit the basics of referencing with this short video from QUT Library.

International Women’s Day

This International Women’s Day seems different to those of the past few years.

Maybe it’s because some of the sisterhood who’s achievements can sometimes be dismissed as frivolous have been rallying so loudly. They have forced action, leading to a shift in mindset for entire industries around the globe. Something that hadn’t hit a nerve in the entertainment world despite Hidden FiguresThelma & Louise and Norma Rae.

The #metoo movement, along with this year’s International Women’s Day call to arms  #PressforProgress will hopefully continue to spur not just women but everyone into action for real equality, diversity and inclusion.

Power to you, and Happy international Women’s Day!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New business models for creative outputs

By Nerida Quatermass

In creative life, many things motivate us to share. Sharing has many benefits. An obvious benefit in a traditional business model is a sale of work. But sharing creativity is also about engagement with your community. Engagement can be difficult to achieve in a world chock a block full of creative content.

Creators are exploring new models for engagement. Interested?

The free eBook Made with Creative Commons showcases some extra-ordinary examples of creators who share their works incorporating licensing under Creative commons licences. It’s still possible to sell your work! As an example, think Cards against Humanity.

The case studies in the book exemplify the power of sharing, which is a defining value of the  Creative Commons movement:

The power of the open licences to maximise innovation.

The power of case studies to provide a guided transition to incorporating Creative Commons in open business models.

The publication of the book itself is a great story about the power of community as the book was crowd-funded on Kickstarter.

In addition to accewaterdropsssing the eBook there are a number of ways that you can get hold of a copy of this book to keep.

(Made with Creative Commons. Cover design by Klaus Nielsen, vinterstille.dk)

(Photo by Linus Nylund on Unsplash)

 

 

Love Data Week Guest blogger: Barriers to open data sharing

The 2014 Ebola outbreak mobilized groups of researchers across the world to sequence viral genomes and share data providing information crucial to “designing effective diagnostics, vaccines and antibody-based therapies” [1].  However uncertainties around ownership of data, intellectual property rights, patient consent and poor management of data all make access to the source of truth very difficult and often essential data is not available to research community working on epidemics.    QUT PhD candidate Anisa Rowhani-Farid, from the School of Public Health and Social Work, discusses some of these barriers to open data sharing in her guest blog today. 

[1]    Yozwiak, N. L., Schaffner, S. F., Sabeti, P. C.: Data sharing: Make outbreak research open access. Nature, 2015, 518:477–479, doi:10.1038/518477a

My desire to pursue research in this field began when I was a junior bench scientist some 10 years ago, conducting anti-malarial drug research. I was confronted with the commercial aspect of scientific research.  I learned about the institutional arrangements between industry, academia, the community, or “consumers”.  I also learned about how intellectual property, patents, and funding arrangements play a critical yet limiting role in contributing to the advancement of scientific knowledge.

Anisa Rowhani-Farid

PhD Candidate Anisa Rowhani-Farid

It became clear to me that scientific research is driven and, more often than not, pressured by the funding available from government and industry, and that these relationships are primarily based on the conception that scientific knowledge is generated through research that views knowledge as a commodity, distributed at a cost to other researchers and most importantly, populations that might need open access to that knowledge.

As I read more, I wondered what happened to all the public money that was spent on health and medical research. I read Chalmers and Glasziou’s (2009) paper on research waste, as well as the series that was published in the Lancet in 2014 called ‘Research: increasing value, reducing waste’.  I learned that around 85% of the world’s spending on health and medical research is wasted per year, and a contributing factor was that the findings of medical studies cannot be reproduced by other researchers and so seemingly successful medical breakthroughs are thus unverifiable [1, 2]. This reproducibility crisis in health and medical research made me think of the way in which scientific knowledge progresses.  I was fascinated by the paper written by John Ioannidis in 2005 where he concluded through simulations that most published findings in the scientific discourse are false and misleading [3, 4].

If most of what is claimed in the scientific literature is false, and if scientists are adopting malpractices because of the pressure to commercialise so-called ‘medical breakthroughs’, then how deep will the cultural change have to be for scientists to conduct high-quality research with integrity, and share all their findings, positive or negative? This question has motivated my doctorate of philosophy.

  1. Chalmers I, Glasziou P: Avoidable waste in the production and reporting of research evidence. The Lancet 2009, 374(9683):86-89.
  2. Chalmers I, Bracken M, Djulbegovic B, Garattini S, Grant J, Gülmezoglu M, Howells D, Ioannidis J, Oliver S: How to increase value and reduce waste when research priorities are set. The Lancet 2014, 383(9912):156-165.
  3. Ioannidis J: How to Make More Published Research True. PLoS Med 2014, 11(10):e1001747.
  4. Ioannidis JPA: Why Most Published Research Findings Are False. PLOS Medicine 2005, 2(8):e124.

Watch this video (YouTube 2m8s) from Anisa Rowhani-Farid and follow her @AnisaFarid on Twitter.

Anisa Rowhani-Farid (YouTube video, 2m8s)If you’re a researcher, we’d love to hear from you.  Leave a comment below on your data story.

Visit the Love Data Week blog each day for stories, resources and activities and if you would like to join the conversation via Twitter #lovedata18 #qutlibrary

 

Love Data Week 2018

It’s Love Data Week!

From the 12th to the 16th of February, along with other academic and research libraries, data archives and organisations, QUT Library is celebrating the value and importance of research data, which we believe are the foundation of the scholarly record and crucial for advancing our knowledge of the world around us.

The theme for the 2018 social media event is ‘data stories’ including :

Stories about data
Telling stories with data
Connected conversations
We are data

Anisa Rowhani-Farid, from the School of Public Health and Social Work, Faculty of Health who’s completing a PhD Towards a culture of open science and data sharing in health and medical research at QUT has this to say about data and reproducible science:

Efforts are underway by the global meta-research community to strengthen the reliability of the scientific method [1].  Data sharing is an indispensable part of the movement towards science that is open; where scientific truth is not a questionable commodity, but is easily accessible, replicable, and verifiable [2].  The cultural shift towards reproducible science is complex and it calls for a twofold change in the attitudes of individual researchers toward reproducibility, and the leadership provided by the systems and services that support scientific research.  As such, journals, universities, government bodies, and funders are key players in promoting this culture.  Transparency and reproducibility are elements central to strengthening the scientific method, and data provides the key to scientific truth [3].”

 

  1. Ioannidis JPA, Fanelli D, Dunne DD, Goodman SN: Meta-research: Evaluation and Improvement of Research Methods and Practices. PLoS Biol 2015, 13(10):e1002264.
  2. Reproducibility and reliability of biomedical research: improving research practice. In.: The Academy of Medical Sciences; 2015.
  3. Iqbal SA, Wallach JD, Khoury MJ, Schully SD, Ioannidis JPA: Reproducible Research Practices and Transparency across the Biomedical Literature. PLoS Biol 2016, 14(1):e1002333.

If you’re a researcher, leave a comment below on your data story.

Visit the Love Data Week blog each day for stories, resources and activities and if you would like to join the conversation via Twitter #lovedata18  @qutlibrary

Go for gold!

The Winter Olympics start this week, the same as Orientation Week here at QUT. What a coincidence! Just like the Winter Olympians, to succeed at university you must prepare and work hard. QUT Library is offering several Library 101 workshops so you can prepare yourself for the upcoming semester. Practice your referencing, polish your searching skills and discover all of the services and resources available at QUT Library.

If you are aiming for a gold medal this semester, you can also have a look at study skills workshops and library tours. These will help you develop your study skills and, you guessed it, prepare yourself for getting the most out of your classes and assignments.

Preparing for university, and the Olympics, also means thinking about your health and wellbeing. QUT Library’s video streaming service, Kanopy, has over 300 videos related to sport and fitness. Plus you can watch Dr. Anna Baranowsky explain How to create a wellness mind map or find The Secret of Life Wellness.

You can also contact HiQ to get assistance as you (just like the Winter Olympians!) strive for gold this semester!