National Reconciliation Week 2017

National Reconciliation Week runs annually marking two milestones in Australia’s reconciliation journey: The 1967 referendum and the historic Mabo decision, respectively.  This year is highly significant because it is 50 years since the 1967 referendum, and 25 years since the historic Mabo decision.

This year QUT Library will be running a number of events  as part of National Reconciliation Week from 27 May – 3 June. Throughout the week, QUT Library Kelvin Grove will host a number of video screenings, music and book displays on Level 2, 3 & 4 of the building.

Also, during this time the Gardens Point and Kelvin Grove HiQ digital walls will be showcasing Indigenous talent, culture and history, with features from outstanding QUT Alumni.

Please come and join us in celebrating these highly important events in Australia’s reconciliation journey.

National Simultaneous Storytime 2017

National Simultaneous Storytime will be held on Wednesday 24 May 2017, as part of Library and Information Week.

An annual event, National Simultaneous Storytime provides an opportunity for libraries, schools, pre-schools, childcare centres, family homes, bookshops and many other places around the country to promote the value of reading to young Australians.

The-Cow-Tripped-Over-The-Moon-Book-Cover-Image

You’re invited to participate in National Simultaneous Storytime, which this year takes place at 11am this Wednesday 24 May. Everyone can join National Simultaneous Storytime – it doesn’t matter whether you are a home school, a public library or even a university library! This year both Kelvin Grove Library and Caboolture Library will be participating in National Simultaneous Storytime so join in and share The Cow Tripped Over the Moon written by Tony Wilson and illustrated by Laura Wood.

There are plenty of resources available to support your National Simultaneous Storytime event – check out these Teacher Notes for The Cow Tripped Over the Moon and get creative making these finger puppets to accompany your reading of the book!

Referencing Hack #4 – What’s in a numbered reference?

One question we get asked a lot at the library is what are all the parts that make up the reference? This referencing hack breaks down a QUT Numbered reference so that we can fully understand all the components of it.

Here is our example, which is a journal article with DOI (Digital Object Identifier).

And here are what all the parts, separated by different colours, refer to.

Grey – This is the number assigned to the reference in text. These run consecutively with the first reference having the number [1] then the next reference has [2] and so on.

Pink – These are the authors of the journal article.

Light green – This is the title of the journal article.

Light Blue – This is the abbreviated name of the journal that this article was published in.

Orange – The online medium on which you accessed this article. This is usually [Internet].

Dark blue – The year the journal article was published.

Purple – The exact date that you referenced this article in your assignment.

Red – Information about the journal article. The volume number comes first and the issue number (if the article has one) follows in brackets.

Dark green – This refers to the number of computer screens the online resource runs over i.e. roughly how many screens did you scroll through to read the whole article?

Black – This is the URL of the journal article.

Yellow – The DOI [Digital Object Identifier] of the journal article.

These sections can be applied to other examples of numbered referencing also, with perhaps small tweaks. You can view more examples on QUT cite|write. If you need further assistance with understanding your referencing don’t forget you can always contact a referencing expert!

 

Referencing Hack #3 QUT Harvard Style

QUT Harvard is one of the four referencing styles we use at QUT and is based on The Chicago Manual of Style. Like APA, Harvard is what we refer to as an “Author/Date” style and refers to how the beginning of your reference should start.

Students in the Faculty of Creative Industries and School of Justice will be most familiar with QUT Harvard. A question we are asked often is how to cite a TV show or movie. When you are looking for the “author” of the work, who do we attribute credit to? Is it the director, writer, or producer? In the case of QUT Harvard you should always use the writer’s name as the lead reference, followed by the year it was produced, title of the work, the director and producer, where and who it was published by, and lastly the format of the resource.

Example (Writer as main author): Atherden, Geoffrey. 1986. Babakiueria. Directed by Don Featherstone. Produced by Julian Pringle. Sydney: Australian Broadcasting Corporation. DVD.

If the writer of the source is not credited you should then choose the person who is most responsible for creating the work.

Example (Director as main author): Featherstone, Don. 1986. Babakiueria. Produced by Julian Pringle. Sydney: Australian Broadcasting Corporation. DVD.

Key takeaway – if you can’t find a specific referencing example on QUT Cite | Write, you can always build your own reference using parts from other examples. Did you access your TV show or movie from an online database? Add the URL to the end of your reference. The trick for all of these is to be consistent and if you have any questions make sure to contact the Library.

ANZAC Day 2017

On the 25th of April 1915, the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) landed on the beaches of Gallipoli in the First World War. Today, we acknowledge ANZAC day as a time for national remembrance and reflection to commemorate those who served or continue to serve in the Australian armed forces.

There are a wealth of resources available from QUT Library if you want to know more about ANZAC day and the legacy it has created, take a look at some of the videos we’ve selected below:

Making It Right: To mark Anzac Day, Kris Flanders travels to Adelaide and meets Indigenous war veterans who talk about entitlements and what it was like fighting on the front line

Anzac secrets: Many men and women came home from Gallipoli, put their medals away and tried to erase painful memories by not talking about them

Recognising the role of women in the Australian Defence Force: When Australia commemorates the Anzac centenary this weekend, most of the tributes will be paid to the thousands of men who died fighting

Referencing Hack #2 – Square vs Round Brackets

With QUT Legal referencing one of the more tricky concepts to navigate is whether you need to use square or round brackets when citing cases. Don’t worry, you are not alone! Here are some tips to help clear up some of the confusion so you know exactly what to cite.

Tip #1 Figure out what the abbreviation is to determine if it is from a reported legal series or an unreported judgment by looking at our Common Cases Abbreviation list. An unreported judgment’s abbreviation will often be a court of law, such as the QCA (Queensland Court of Appeal) or the FCA (Federal Court of Australia). A reported judgment means the case was published in a report series, such as the Commonwealth Law Reports or the Queensland Reports.

Tip #2 Reported Judgments with square brackets [2017] – The date within the square brackets is the year this case was published in the report series. It is also the volume number. If there is more then one part of a volume there will be a sequential number after the brackets, such as 1 or 2. A case may wait a few years before it is published so these report series’ may contain cases that were heard from a variety of years.The citation below shows that that the case can be found in volume 2016 of the Queensland Reports, part 1.

Tip #3 Reported Judgments with round brackets (2017) – The date within the round brackets is the year of the case’s judgment. Report series who use round brackets organise their volumes by a volume number, which can be found directly after the date in round brackets. The citation below shows that the case can be found in volume 256 of the Commonwealth Law Reports.

Tip #4 Unreported Judgments always have square brackets [2017] – If your abbreviation relates to a specific court of law then your citation is an unreported judgement otherwise known as a medium neutral citation. The date within the square brackets is the year of judgment. Remember, unreported judgments may also be published in a reported series, so make sure to keep an eye out for alternative citations.You should always cite using the most authoritative citation. More information about authoritative cases can be found on our Introduction to Case Law Guide. 

If you need further assistance with your referencing you can contact your friendly QUT Librarians for help.

Referencing Hack #1 – Edited eBooks

With assignments getting finalised, referencing is high on the To Do list. Over the next week or so we will be sharing our top tips for referencing to make completing your assignment that much easier.

The first tip we want to share is referencing a chapter in an edited eBook with QUT APA. Although there are no specific examples in QUT cite|write on how to do this, we recommend combining the references for Chapter in an Edited Book and Electronic Book (eBook) together. You keep the first half of the Chapter in an edited book example but when you get to the publishing details exchange them for the eBook details including the eBook platform and the URL or DOI for the eBook. Below are 2 examples, from the APA Blog, on how put this all together.

The second example contains a DOI, which is a Digital Object Identifier, and should always be used if available over a standard web address.

Key takeaway – even if you can’t find a specific referencing example for your resource on QUT Cite Write, you can build your own reference using parts from other examples. This goes for many referencing styles! However, if you are unsure about your referencing, you can always contact the library for assistance.

Have a tricky referencing question? Let us know know can add it to our Referencing Hack series!

How to Find Specialised Information

With assignments coming up everyone is looking for that perfect piece of information. Sometimes you cannot find this information in a journal article or a textbook and you have to look a little bit harder to find it.

To help you with finding this type of specialised information QUT Librarians have put together some handy How to find guides. These can help you find things such as cases, classroom and curriculum resources such as lesson plans, evidence based information, industry reports and market research, standards and even videos.

You can find the full list of our “How to find” guides from the QUT Library homepage.How to find information is located on the library homepage under the Databases and Specialised Search Tools box.

If you need further assistance to find information for your assignments, you can always contact the library. May the search for information be ever in your favor!

Those unspoken library rules you know (and some you might not)

Rules are everywhere. Some of these rules we just “know” and other rules are learned: keep to the left when riding the escalator, turn off your mobile phone at the movies, or wait in an orderly line to place your coffee order. In the Library it works much the same, there are some rules which are set in black and white and others which we can fill you in on. Here is a friendly reminder about some of the QUT Library rules that you might not know about.

  • You are allowed to eat and drink in the library – just be considerate of the others sharing your space and make sure your food isn’t smelly or noisy to consume.
  • You are responsible for your own belongings so do not leave them unattended. Check out our blog Don’t Leave Personal Items Unattended for more information.
  • If you have a laptop, don’t sit in a space with a desktop computer – let someone who doesn’t have a computer use this space.
  • You can book a study room for up to 2 hours, but if you don’t show up for your booking 15 minutes past the hour the room is free for anyone to use.
  • You can borrow as many books as you like! Just keep an eye out on when they are due back.
  • You can talk in the library. Each of our campus libraries has collaborative areas where you can talk till your heart’s content. But be mindful of our silent study areas where talking (including phone conversations) is a no no.

If you aren’t sure about any of these rules you can always contact our friendly library staff for assistance!

Open science, open data – the World Science Festival Brisbane

“It’s not enough to do it; it must be communicated” – Virginia Barbour, Executive Director, Australasian Open Access Strategy Group, on a key concept in science.

Providing open access to research, including publications, data, software, methodologies and all other research outputs, is a growing worldwide initiative, as is the drive to solve real-world problems and stimulate innovation.  The lack of access to research publications and their accompanying data is inhibiting national and international collaboration, public debate and research, however, times are changing.

Originally applied only to data, the F.A.I.R. principles now apply to all research outputs, as proposed at a November 2016 meeting of the G20 Science, Technology and Innovation Ministers Meeting.  Research findings that are F.A.I.R. are Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable.

“With F.A.I.R. access, Australian research will be more visible, the broader community will have better access to well-founded knowledge, Australian researchers will be able to more easily collaborate locally and globally, including with industry, and the Australian research enterprise will be more accountable to the community it serves” – F.A.I.R. Access Working Group

Dr Salvatore Mele from the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) reports that research in the field of physics has always been openly available, with researchers posting each other hard copies of publications that were submitted for review.  During the World Science Festival, which is being held in Brisbane from 22-26 March, the world-renowned Large Hadron Collider will be on display at the Queensland Museum.

Managed by CERN, the data collected from use of the Collider are published in the CERN Open Data Portal, and are accompanied by the software and documentation required to make sense of the data being shared.  Here at QUT, researchers can publish their data and accompanying material through our data repository, Research Data Finder.  We’re doing our bit to accelerate open science by providing access to open data!

Take a look at datasets that have already been added, including ‘Fusion transcripts in prostate cancer using RNA sequences derived from Australian and Chinese men’ by Dr Jyotsna Batra and Dr John Lai, and perhaps add one of your own at QUT Research Data Finder.