Relationships in online learning

Establishing relationships in online learning

In 2004 George Siemens developed the idea of ‘Connectivisim’. Essentially it is about people learning with technology in a connected environment. Summing up connectivist teaching and learning, Steven Downs says: “…to teach is to model and demonstrate, to learn is to practice and reflect.” The connectivisim learning theory is particularly relevant to MOOC’s the – Massive Open Online Courses. Bayne says that a lack of “talking heads” might have made some participants feel that there was “no ‘professor’ present in the course”. Of course it is difficult to have a relationship with your instructor in a course of 50,000+ enrollments and one instructor but having a talking head video significantly helps create the sense of what Peter Norvig calls a ‘personal tutor’. Read more

Why Leadership Training Fails – and what to do about it

Dr Brett Heyward

You know it in your gut. You’ve experienced it on several occasions – the blush of undergoing a leadership intensive, only to return to the workplace, and find yourself slipping back into the habits of a lifetime –  the “same ol’; same ol’.”  You know there is a better way, but you can’t muster what it takes to make it happen.

Veteran Harvard luminary, Michael Beer, and his fellow researchers, Finnstrom and Schrader nail “what goes wrong with leadership training” with this recent addition to the Harvard Business Review stable. Read more

LCAM study tour to Harvard

LCAM Visits the Boston Ballet

LCAM cohort visits the Boston Ballet

In July 2016, QUT launched the Executive Graduate Certificate in Business (Leadership through coaching and Mentoring) designed for leaders inspired to coach and coaches inspired to lead. In particular, this program is for leaders who want to use coaching and mentoring to implement positive change in their organisation.

Read more

Workplace projects: Exploring new ground

Ailsa Doyle

Ailsa Doyle reflects on the opportunity that her workplace project presented.

Like many students nearing the end of their MBA journey, Ailsa Doyle wanted to explore new ground,  extract as much value from the program as possible and further differentiate her skills and experience. Consequently, she chose to undertake a project outside of her workplace that aligned with her interests and desire to make a difference. After approaching a number of Brisbane-based charities, Boystown (now Yourtown) proposed a research project into social benefit bonds. Read more