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Australian and international Dinos living in our zoo

Dino Zoo features well-known dinosaurs such as T-Rex, Stegosaurus and Triceratops as well as five Australian dinosaurs including Queensland’s own Muttaburrasaurus, Kunbarrasaurus, Rhoetosaurus, Coelurosaur and Australovenator nicknamed Banjo.

Visitors can immerse themselves in the zoo, interact with the dinosaurs, and play fun activities on the touch screens. Some of the dinosaurs will move in herds, some will hunt in small packs, and some like to hunt on their own.

Dino Animation 3

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Winter holiday sees nature in focus

QUT’s Winter holiday program saw The Cube come alive with over 3,700 budding geologists, nature explorers, and aspiring artists. The holiday program, inspired by The Cube’s new project Nature imaginedoffered a range of activities for visitors to explore and interact with science, art, and nature.

A guided tour of Nature imagined kicked off the first day of the program. Led by artist Maureen Hansen, visitors were led on a journey of discovery from The Cube to The William Robinson Gallery. Maureen highlighted inside information on the artworks gained through her time as a student of Robinson’s. She demonstrated his brush mark techniques by zooming into the detail on The Cube screens and pointed out the distinctive use of colour in the original paintings displayed at the William Robinson Gallery.

Nature imagined at The Cube. Photo by Patrick Hamilton

In the Micro Macro sessions, children made their own artworks using source images of plants, animals, and even microbes drawn from the Springbrook region. We were impressed by the wonderful variety of creative responses – from ladybugs, to frogs, birds, and even butterflies! The huge evolving collage was curated by resident artist, Jacqui Smith, from the Scale Free Network. She orchestrated all the elements (and kept chaos at bay!) by adding individual artworks to the collage which was also captured in the time-lapse video recording.

Micro Macro. Photo by Patrick Hamilton.

Each morning of the holiday program, an excited group arrived to take part in the Become a budding geologist workshop. Kasia and Adam, QUT Extreme Science Van ambassadors and real geological researchers, lead a group of 8-15 year olds and uncovered the mysterious world of minerals. Over 240 visitors booked into the workshops and the children were amazed to see the colourful rock samples through the high-tech polarizing microscopes and were keen to learn about the techniques used by geologists to identify rocks.

Become a budding geologist workshop. Photo by Patrick Hamilton.

QUT’s Science and Engineering Faculty lent us their augmented reality sandpit and it proved to be a real hit with children! With hand-sanitiser at the ready, visitors were able to shape mountains and valleys generating new topographic projections and even created virtual rain.

To complete the digital scavenger hunt, visitors borrowed iPads and collected fun facts about insects, animals, and plants. These super sleuths did a great job and even had to peek under The Cube stairs to complete some of the scavenger hunt missions. Beanbags, books, and puzzles were the order of the day for those wanting to read and relax.

Nature imagined guided tour at the William Robinson Gallery. Photo by Patrick Hamilton

Thank you to all the enthusiastic art and nature explorers who came along to QUT Winter holiday program! Nature imagined is now in rotation on The Cube screens and the exhibition at the William Robinson Gallery remains open until June 2019.

 

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Unpacking the development of Nature imagined

Q&A with Vanessa Van Ooyen and Simon Harrison

Nature imagined is an exciting new collaboration and will be displayed in two mediums: in the William Robinson Gallery and digitally on The Cube. This unique interaction of art and science provides an inspiring and explorative digital experience and this week we talk to Vanessa Van Ooyen, Senior Curator of the William Robinson Gallery, and Simon Harrison, The Cube Studio Manager about the development of Nature imagined.


Vanessa: The William Robinson Gallery and The Cube are two very different venues to showcase William Robinson’s work, how did the idea for Nature imagined come about? And can you tell us how Robinson’s knowledge of the works has informed the project?

As the gallery is focused solely on William Robinson’s work, we are interested in finding innovative ways of exploring his practice and engaging a wider audience with it. We are fortunate enough to be a part of a multidisciplinary university with fantastic resources such as The Cube that allows for exciting collaborations. Both venues have a strong focus on education, so it was only natural for a partnership between the spaces to showcase Bill’s work to its full potential. Read more

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The Cube turns five!

What a year it has been! We can’t believe we’re already half a decade old.

The Cube just turned 5, and what better way to celebrate than taking a look at some of the highlights of the past year.  

Georgie Pinn’s Cube Residency

Cube Resident George Pinn brought a unique flare to The Cube, developing an immersive and interactive project entitled Echo. Echo used facial tracking technology, animation and sound to explore notions of empathy and shared identity.

Image © QUT. ECHO

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Exploring art and science over Summer

How was your summer? We spent ours exploring art and science with lots of new friends! Our Public Programs Officer, Kerry Turnbull takes us through the highlights of the 2018 Draw it. Code it. | QUT Summer Holiday Program at The Cube.

What a blast January was! We were thrilled to welcome over 5,000 visitors to The Cube from 6 to 14 January during the summer holiday break. Families, eager to break the school holiday boredom blues, brought along children excited to engage in the range of hands-on activities on offer at The Cube and QUT Art Museum.

Image © QUT. Code-A-Bot at Draw It Code It Holiday Program.

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80s style games with a maths twist!

Everything old is new again and you can get your 80s fix with The Retro Arcade, which launches on 6 January 2018 at the Draw It. Code It. QUT Summer Holiday Program. Using the power of algorithms and Unity 3D software to immerses users in an 80’s style world, The Retro Arcade includes two new games, Mighty Pucks and Track Stars, and old favourites Block Breakers, Space Junk and Parabola Pirates.

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Learn the basics of coding through play

As our world rapidly changes with the influence of technology touching every aspect of our lives, it’s vital that children are equipped with the necessary skills to navigate a dynamic and ever-evolving future. In Queensland, the Department of Education and Training’s #codingcounts initiative places great emphasis on coding and robotics technologies, introducing these learning areas into the curriculum to ensure all students have the opportunity and support to become digital creators and innovators of tomorrow.

The Cube’s most recent project, Code-A-Bot, aims to teach users the fundamentals of coding in a highly interactive and immersive digital game, which also educates users on recycling and robotics. Cube Studio Manager, Sean Druitt and Digital Interactive Designer, Simon Harrison talk about the journey to develop Code-A-Bot, and the opportunities it provides for students to learn about the fundamentals of coding.

Image © QUT. Code-A-Bot at The Cube.

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The Physics Observatory (aka Physics Playroom 2.0)

The Cube team have been hard at work this year re-developing The Physics Playroom, one of The Cube’s first screen projects. This new iteration The Physics Observatory, is due to be released sometime in the next six months. In this series of blog posts The Cube’s Digital Interactive Designer, Simon Harrison, will share with us some of the teams’ learnings about physics.

When we decided to update this project to make it even more relevant to high school students, I stumbled upon some interesting facts and became fascinated by tales of physicists, great thinkers and even watchmakers of times gone by.

The original Physics Playroom featured an interesting rotating mechanical solar system. I discovered this device is called an orrery – a clockwork representation of the orbits of the planets that make our solar system. Using only cogs and gears it was possible to accurately simulate the motions of distant planetary bodies, incredibly this was achieved over 300 years ago!

 

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The orrery from the original Physics Playroom

The first orrery was created by a pair of very talented watchmakers from London called George Graham and Thomas Tompion, It was presented to Charles Boyle, 4th Earl of Orrery in 1704.

Our orrery has been lovingly crafted using the latest in 3D simulation software and up to the minute data from NASA, however, it looks almost identical to an Orrery from the past. I bet George and Thomas would love to come to The Cube and have a play with ours!

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The new orrery during construction

The new orrery features all the planets (including Pluto, we can’t let it go!) and a selection of planetary moons, all rotating around the sun. If the planets were to rotate at real-time speed, it would take 90,560 days for Pluto to make a single complete orbit, that is almost 250 years! So we have included a speed control to help accelerate and visualise the orbits.

As always we strive to lace our interactives with STEM related curriculum links and the orrery is no exception, our team of STEM teachers and researchers will be creating school workshops and programs linking the orrery to elements included in both the Science and Mathematics learning areas of the Australian National Curriculum. More details about school/holiday programs coming soon.

Unity Education (64bit) - renderScene.unity - PhysicsPlayroom - PC, Mac & Linux Standalone DX11_9

The final orrery in the observatory

And next time we’ll discuss how we managed gravity and how much an elephant may weigh on the surface of the Sun.