Professor Reece Walters – ESC Conference, Sarajevo

Professor Reece Walters (Director, Crime, Justice and Social Democracy Research Centre) is pictured above with Professor Gorazd Mesko (President of the European Society of Criminology) at this week’s ESC conference in Sarajevo. Reece has been an International Partner Investigator with Professor Mesko on a Euro$770,000 project examining Water Crimes in Europe funded by the European Commission. This research will be published in a forthcoming book entitled Water, Governance and Crime. Reece has also presented a paper at the ESC as part of special panel on Southern Criminology chaired by QUT Adjunct Professor Maximo Sozzo. Reece’s paper was based on a chapter co-authored with QUT Adjunct Professors Nigel South and Avi Brisman and published in the Palgrave Handbook of Criminology and Global South edited by Kerry Carrington et al. Reece’s presentation focussed on the following:

The politics and conquests of the Global North have long necessitated the forced migration, colonization and ecological plunder of the Global South for imperial and capital expansionism. In recent decades, these excesses of accelerated industrialization have created new victims, with entire populations or “climate refugees” (Barnes and Dove 2015) or “environmental refugees” (Seelye 2001) dislocated by human-induced climate change. This presentation adopts Connell’s (2007) southern theory and Carrington and colleagues’ (2015) idea of a “southern criminology” to examine critically the notion of ‘climate apartheid’ and explore its impacts on the increasing number of individuals displaced by environmental harms.

Book: Water, Crime and Security in the Twenty-First Centre – Too Dirty, Too Little, Too Much

Professor Reece Walters, Director, CJRC, is one of the Series Editors and also a contributor to the recently released book series, Water, Crime and Security in the Twenty-First Century – Too Dirty, Too Little, Too Much. 

This series represents criminology’s first book-length contribution to the study of water and water-related crimes, harms and security. The chapters cover topics such as: water pollution, access to fresh water in the Global North and Global South, water and climate change, the commodification of water and privatization, water security and pacification, and activism and resistance surrounding issues of access and pollution. With examples ranging from Rio de Janeiro to Flint, Michigan to the Thames River, this original study offers a comprehensive criminological overview of the contemporary and historical relationship between water and crime.  Coinciding with the International Decade for Action, “Water for Sustainable Development,” 2018–2028, this timely volume will be of particular relevance to students and scholars of green criminology, as well as those interested in critical geography, environmental anthropology, environmental sociology, political ecology, and the study of corporate crime and state crime.

Further information can be found here – https://www.palgrave.com/us/book/9781137529855