Event: Tuesday 23 October 2018 @ 6pm – A world without privacy – Australia’s role in an international privacy crisis


Dear Members and Friends of the AIIA QLD,

IMPORTANT: Please note a venue for this event has not been finalised. Members will be notified as soon as a location is confirmed. We urge members to register as this is a high-profile event on a major issue. Queensland Privacy Commissioner Philip Green is one of the panelists. You will note that the website lists the offices of Holding Redlich Lawyers as the venue. Please disregard this. It will be corrected when the new venue is known

Our next event is scheduled for TUESDAY the 23rd of October 2018, at 6 for 6:30pm. There will be a big turnout for this event. Please register by clicking here:  https://aiiaqld.tidyhq.com/public/schedule/events/21569-a-world-without-privacy-australia-s-role-in-an-international-privacy-crisis

All events are free for AIIA members. Non-members are welcome and can pay $15 (or $10 for student non-members) online while registering. Or they can pay at the door on the night. Drinks are available for purchase at the event, as well as copies of our latest policy commentary (which are free for our members). Details on all events for this month are available on our website and our Facebook page.

A world without privacy – Australia’s role in an international privacy crisis

An AIIA Qld Conversations event with Queensland Privacy Commissioner Philip Green, Angus Murray, and Dr Monique Mann

With the rise of social media platforms, digital profiles, transactions and subscriptions, an individuals’ data footprint is constantly expanding. Who owns that data? Is privacy a reality? And is Australian regulation tough enough? Both the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights recognise privacy as a fundamental human right. But are these conventions being undermined by a data driven economy and international security concerns. If so, what is the effect of this? Will a loss of privacy equal a loss of autonomy?

With Australia’s privacy legislation under review and consideration, we seek to discuss the effects this will have on the world’s perceptions on Australia’s relationship with privacy. In light of the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) setting the ‘golden standard’ on privacy, does Australia continue to lag behind? Join us for a conversation in which we discuss these important questions and more.

About our speakers

Philip Green was appointed to the position of Privacy Commissioner, Office of the Information Commissioner in December 2015. Philip has worked in many different Queensland Government roles and in private practice throughout his career.  Prior to his appointment as Privacy Commissioner, he was Executive Director, Small Business – Department of Tourism, Major Events, Small Business and the Commonwealth Games and has held this role since 2008.  He was responsible for leading Innovation Policy and Innovation Partnerships and Services and Office of Small Business Teams in the delivery of high level policy development, program management, service delivery and advice. Philip holds degrees in law and arts (with economic minor) and was admitted as a solicitor of the Supreme Court of Queensland and High Court of Australia in February 1992. As the Privacy Commissioner Philip actively promotes and champions privacy rights and responsibilities in Queensland. In his role as Privacy Commissioner, Philip leads the staff in OIC responsible for mediating privacy complaints which have not been resolved with the Queensland Government agency involved; conducting reviews and audits of privacy compliance; giving compliance notices for serious, flagrant or recurring breaches of the privacy principles; and waiving or modifying an agency’s privacy obligations for a particular purpose or project.

Angus Murray is a practising solicitor and human rights advocate. He is a Vice President of the Queensland Council for Civil Liberties, the Chair of Electronic Frontiers Australia’s Policy and Research Committee and a Partner and Trade Marks Attorney at Irish Bentley Lawyers. He is also a co-founder and national director of The Legal Forecast and a professional member of Australian Lawyers for Human Rights. He holds a Master of Laws from Stockholm University and his academic work has focused on the interaction between the right to privacy and the enforcement of intellectual property law.

Dr Monique Mann is the Vice Chancellor’s Research Fellow in Technology and Regulation at the Faculty of Law, Queensland University of Technology. She is a member of: The Crime, Justice and Social Democracy Research Centre (CJSDRC) at QUT Law; The Intellectual Property and Innovation Law (IPIL) Research Program at QUT Law; The International Law and Global Governance (ILGG) Research Program at QUT Law, and; The Digital Media Research Centre (DMRC) at QUT Creative Industries Faculty. Dr Mann is advancing a program of socio-legal research on the intersecting topics of algorithmic justice, police technology, surveillance, and transnational online policing. She is on the Board of Directors of the Australian Privacy Foundation.

 

 

Recently published: Domestic Violence on #qanda: The ‘‘Man’’ Question in Live Twitter Discussion on the Australian Broadcasting Corporation’s Q&A

mollyBurgess

Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz from the School of Justice, Faculty of Law and Professor Jean Burgess, Director of the QUT Digital Media Research Centre and Professor of Digital Media in the Creative Industries Faculty recently published: Domestic Violence on #qanda: The ‘‘Man’’ Question in Live Twitter Discussion on the Australian Broadcasting Corporation’s Q&A in volume 28.1 of The Canadian Journal of Women and the Law.

Read more

UPCOMING CJRC SEMINAR SERIES with Dr Michael Salter

IMG_Michael Salter_20150506

Join us for the next Crime and Justice Research Centre Seminar Series with Speaker Dr Michael Salter from the University of Western Sydney.

TOPIC: From #OpGabon to #OpDeathEaters: Transnational justice flows on social media

Date: Thursday 24 September  2015
Time: 3.00pm – 4.30pm, afternoon tea provided
Venue: Room C412, Level 4, C Block, QUT Gardens Point Campus, 2 George Street, Brisbane

Register by: Friday 18 September  2015 to cjrc@qut.edu.au or am.gurd@qut.edu.au

Abstract: Studies of online crime have often observed that the transnational nature of the internet overwhelms jurisdictional boundaries, inhibiting law enforcement responses where online abuse occurs or where online justice-seeking takes illegal forms. However criminologists have paid less attention to the manner in which social media expands the geographical horizon of public opinion, promoting transnational rather than national frames of reference for responses to crime and injustice. This paper describes two interlinked ‘operations’ by the online activist network Anonymous to illustrate transnational justice flows on social media. Anonymous’ 2013 intervention in apparently politically connected ritual killings in the African state of Gabon, called Operation Gabon, led to Operation Death Eaters in 2014, a wide-ranging social media campaign against elite involvement in organised child abuse in the Global North as well as the Global South. In this process, Anonymous developed a complex critique of the role of elite deviance in international social and economic inequality that defied taken-for-granted distinctions between ‘developed’ and ‘under-developed’ countries. The paper describes and analyses the emergence of ‘Operation Death Eaters’ as an example of the transnational circuits of public opinion emerging on social media that are producing new grammars of moral contestation and social protest. However the paper asks whether mechanisms exist for the implementation of such novel forms of political consensus, emphasising the ‘lag’ between transnational public opinion and the grounding of public power within the nation-state.