Supporting Survivors of Domestic and Family Violence: RSVP by 17 April 2015

Supporting Survivors of Domestic and Family Violence: Challenges and Recommendations for Justice Responses

QUT’s Crime and Justice Research Centre and CQU’s Queensland Centre for Domestic and Family Violence Research for a discussion about research and practice to improve justice responses to domestic and family violence in Queensland. We welcome practitioners, survivors, scholars, students and community members to attend this community event.

Date: Tuesday 21 April 2015
Time: 1.30pm – 5.00pm with afternoon tea provided from 3.30pm – 4.00pm          Location: SLQ Auditorium 2,
State Library of Queensland, Cultural Precinct, Stanley Place, South Bank, Brisbane, 4101
see map here

Please RSVP by Friday 17 April 2015 to enquiries@cjrc.qut.edu.au

Panel 1: Domestic violence: Improving systems responses to Indigenous survivors

Research Perspective
Who’s failing whom? From policy to criminology: The potential consequences of Indigenous children’s exposure to family violence and its impact on Indigenous families and communities.
Dr Kylie Cripps
Indigenous Law Centre, Faculty of Law, University of New South Wales

Practice Perspective
Key challenges and recommendations for improving legal systems responses to survivors: Regional and metropolitan experiences
Wynetta Dewis and Hayley Smith
Queensland Indigenous Family Violence Legal Service

Panel 2: Criminal Justice Responses to Domestic Violence

Research Perspective
Muslim women’s experiences with the criminal justice system in Australia: Reporting intimate partner violence
Dr Nada Ibrahim
Queensland Centre for Domestic and Family Violence Research

Practice Perspective
Domestic violence and the criminal law: Can we do this better?
Her Honour Judge Fleur Y Kingham
District Court Judge, Queensland

enquiries@cjrc.qut.edu.au

cdfvr cqu

 

 

 

 

 

Dr Kelly Richards’ research on reducing sexual offending in the news

Kelly

Dr Kelly Richards was recently featured in an ABC news story about a South Australian trial of the Circles of Support and Accountability model to reduce sexual offending. Richards’ 2011 article The potential of Circles of Support and Accountability (COSA) to reduce child sexual abuse in Australia reviewed research on the effectiveness of similar programs in other jurisdictions. Read her commentary on the programs here.

Read the full ABC article here