Special Issue – International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy

A new issue of International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy is now available. This special issue Towards Global Green Criminological Dialogues: Voices from the Americas and Europe is a timely publication which strives to present diverse voices to support the goal of Southern criminology to level inequalities in the valuing of criminological knowledge in the Global North and the Global South. Guest editors David Rodríguez Goyes, Ragnhild Sollund and Nigel South present six articles and three book reviews (most co-written by Latin American and ‘Northern’ authors) with an aim to “create ‘Global Green Criminological Dialogues’ rather than just reproduce ‘voices from Latin America’ “.

Highlights include Yaneth Katia Apaza Huanca’s interpretation of Pachamama (sacred Mother Earth) in Non-Western Epistemology and the Understanding of the Pachamama (Environment) Within the World(s) of the Aymara Identity; and Ragnhild Sollund, Ángela Maldonado and Claudia Brieva Rico’s analysis of the global measures applied to counteract climate change, and the effects these measures have on local peripheral communities in The Norway–Colombia Agreement to Protect Rainforest and Reduce Global Warming: Success or Failure? In the article Between ‘Conservation’ and ‘Development’: The Construction of ‘Protected Nature’ and the Environmental Disenfranchisement of Indigenous Communities, David R. Goyes and Nigel South discuss hidden intentions behind conservation projects, arguing that development projects and conservation projects often share the effect of environmentally disenfranchising Indigenous communities.

Any enquiries regarding the Journal should be forwarded to Tracy Creagh, Journal Manager – t.creagh@qut.edu.au

Book: Water, Crime and Security in the Twenty-First Centre – Too Dirty, Too Little, Too Much

Professor Reece Walters, Director, CJRC, is one of the Series Editors and also a contributor to the recently released book series, Water, Crime and Security in the Twenty-First Century – Too Dirty, Too Little, Too Much. 

This series represents criminology’s first book-length contribution to the study of water and water-related crimes, harms and security. The chapters cover topics such as: water pollution, access to fresh water in the Global North and Global South, water and climate change, the commodification of water and privatization, water security and pacification, and activism and resistance surrounding issues of access and pollution. With examples ranging from Rio de Janeiro to Flint, Michigan to the Thames River, this original study offers a comprehensive criminological overview of the contemporary and historical relationship between water and crime.  Coinciding with the International Decade for Action, “Water for Sustainable Development,” 2018–2028, this timely volume will be of particular relevance to students and scholars of green criminology, as well as those interested in critical geography, environmental anthropology, environmental sociology, political ecology, and the study of corporate crime and state crime.

Further information can be found here – https://www.palgrave.com/us/book/9781137529855

Recently Published – “The commodification and exploitation of fresh water: Property, human rights and green criminology”

                     Hope JohnsonAvatar Image

PhD candidate from the School of Law, Hope Johnson, along with the CJRC’s Professor Reece Walter and Adjunct Professor Nigel South, have recently co-authored an article published in the International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice. Read more