Crime and Justice Research Centre Seminar Series – Doing Research in the Indigenous space – Associate Professor Hilde Tubex

Crime and Justice Research Centre Seminar Series with speaker Associate Professor Hilde Tubex
 
Topic: Doing Research in the Indigenous Space

Date:         Tuesday 13 February 2018
When:       4.00pm – 5.30pm
Venue:      C Block, level 4, room C412,
QUT Gardens Point Campus,
2 George Street, Brisbane

Register:  by Thursday 8 February 2018
by accepting calendar invitation or Emailing    mailto:law.research@qut.edu.au.

Abstract:
Over the last years, the focus of Assoc Professor Tubex’s research has been on Indigenous Peoples in the criminal justice system. Being a criminologist / penologist, this focus is not surprising, given the enormous overrepresentation of Indigenous Peoples in our punitive system. She has built experience over three research projects; starting with the ARC Future Fellowship in which she studied different penal cultures within Australia, based on the different imprisonment rates between Australian jurisdictions, with a particular focus on Indigenous overrepresentation. In this research she studied the causes of Indigenous offending and their presence in the criminal justice system from a theoretical perspective, followed by field work in the Kimberley in WA and Darwin and Alice Springs in the NT. In an ARC Linkage she is CI on a project investigating the validity of risk assessment tools for Indigenous sex offenders. Her specific role is to assist in the development of a methodology to establish culturally appropriate risk assessment tools, alongside an Indigenous psychologist and an Indigenous reference group. She recently completed a CRG funded project on building effective throughcare strategies for Indigenous offenders in WA and the NT, for which they did fieldwork in regional and remote communities in the Kimberley, Darwin, Alice Springs and the Tiwi Islands. They conducted 38 interviews involving 59 people from these communities and their service providers, using yarning as a data collection tool. However, doing research in the Indigenous space, being a non-Indigenous person, is not evident. In this presentation Assoc Professor Tubex would like to share her experiences over these projects and discuss consequences for practice and theory building

Associate Professor Hilde Tubex
Hilde Tubex is Associate Professor and Deputy Head of School, Research at the Law School of the University of Western Australia. Her areas of expertise are comparative criminology, and penal policy, Indigenous peoples and the criminal justice system. Between 2007 and 2011, she worked at the Department of Corrective Services in WA as Team Leader Research and Evaluation. Before migrating to Australia, Hilde worked as a researcher/lecturer at the Free University of Brussels, and as an advisor to the Belgian Minister of Justice and the Council of Europe.