Associate Professor Michael Flood features on Radio National Life Matters: Changing Behaviours around Sexual Consent

CJRC member, Associate Professor Michael Flood, spoke with Radio National Life Matters program this morning on the topic of Changing Behaviours around Sexual Consent.

The movement for change generated by #metoo and the allegations of sexual assault at Australian universities has brought sexual consent into sharp focus.

How do we re-educate and change behaviour so both parties are respected and fully agree to what goes on between them sexually?

Researcher on men, masculinities, gender and violence prevention, Associate Professor Michael Flood of QUT and Mary Barry, CEO of Our Watch, who run the online campaign targetted at 12-20 year olds called The Line, discuss consent and offer some solutions.

You can listen to Michael’s interview, and the full story here

New Issue: International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy

A new issue of International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy has been published today.  With authors from Brazil/Portugal, Croatia, Italy, Norway, Sweden, the United Kingdom, the United States and Australia, the journal’s global representation continues.

There are nine articles in this issue book-ended by Sandra Walklate’s “Criminology, Gender and Risk:  The Dilemmas of Northern Theorising for Southern Responses to Intimate Partner Violence”, and Aleksandar Marsavelski and John Braithwaite who provide insights into “The Best Way to Rob a Bank”.  Additionally, Matt Ball has authored one of two terrific book reviews:  Marianna Valverde’s Michel Voucault (2017).

The following articles are free to download and share.

Current Issue

Vol 7 No 1 (2018): International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy

Published: 2018-03-01


Sandra Walklate


Thiago Pierobom de Avila


Jason Spraitz, Kendra N Bowen, Louisa Strange


Tully O’Neill


Antonio Iudici, Fela Boccato, Elena Faccio


Sophie De’Ath, Catherine Anne Flynn, Melanie Field-Pimm


David Rodríguez Goyes


Ida Nafstad


Aleksandar Marsavelski, John Braithwaite


Book Reviews



View All Issues

Coercive Control Workshop and Celebration of Books

Coercive Control Workshop 

The concept of ‘Coercive Control’ as a means of making sense of the nature and extent of violence(s) in women’s everyday lives has been around since the early 1980s. However its recent revitalisation by Evan Stark has resulted in rejuvenated interest in it in the policy domain. In England and Wales an offence of coercive control was introduced in December 2015 and a recent special edition of Criminology and Criminal Justice exposes this concept and associated legal and professional practices to international interrogation. The purpose of this workshop is to examine the efficacy of the implementation of this recent legislation alongside subjecting this concept to further critical interrogation with a view to examining its potential value for other jurisdictions.

Please join the Crime and Justice Research Centre and the School of Justice for a workshop on ‘Coercive Control’, with leading practitioners and academics. Following the event, there will be a Celebration of Books recently published by Crime and Justice Research Centre members.

March 15, 2018

3.00 – 5.00pm
Including light refreshments
OJW Room, Level 12, S Block, QUT Gardens Point Campus

This event requires registration.  To register, please email Brigid Xavier –  Eventbrite link to follow. 


Kate Fitz-Gibbon
Senior Lecturer in Criminology at Monash University.

Sandra Walklate
Eleanor Rathbone Chair of Sociology at the University of Liverpool (U.K)

Rachel Neil

Principal Solicitor of the Women’s Legal Service (WLS)


Media discourse surrounding ‘non-ideal’ victims – The Ashley Madison data breach case

Media discourses surrounding ‘non-ideal’ victims

The case of the Ashley Madison data breach

Cassandra Cross, Megan Parker and Daniel Sansom


Data breaches are an increasingly common event across businesses globally. Many companies have been subject to large-scale breaches. Consequently, the exposure of 37 million customers of the Ashley Madison website is not an extraordinary event in and of itself. However, Ashley Madison is an online dating website predominantly known for facilitating extramarital affairs. Therefore, the nature of this website (and business) is very different from those that have previously been breached. This article examines one of the media discourses surrounding the victims of the Ashley Madison data breach. It particular, it illustrates examples of victim blaming evident in the print media towards individuals (or customers) who had their personal details exposed. Importantly, it highlights the emerging tension within this particular case, of the strong victim blaming narrative contrasted against those who attempted to challenge this discourse and refocus attention on the actual offenders, and the criminality of the act. The article concludes that victims of this data breach were exposed to victim blaming, based on the perceived immorality of the website they were connected to and their actions in subscribing, rather than focusing on the data breach itself, and the blatant criminality of the offenders who exposed the sensitive information.

Available online at the International Review of Victimology



Book: Biometrics, Crime and Security


Crime and Justice Research Centre Dr Monique Mann recently published a book on Biometrics, Crime and Security with co-authors Dr Marcus Smith (Centre for Law and Justice at Charles Sturt University) and Associate Professor Gregor Urbas (Faculty of Business, Government and Law at the University of Canberra).

The book appears in the Routledge Law, Science and Society Series and can be purchased at this link:

The book addresses the use of biometrics – including fingerprint identification, DNA identification and facial recognition – in the criminal justice system: balancing the need to ensure society is protected from harms, such as crime and terrorism, while also preserving individual rights. It offers a comprehensive discussion of biometric identification that includes a consideration of: basic scientific principles, their historical development, the perspectives of political philosophy, critical security and surveillance studies; but especially the relevant law, policy and regulatory issues.


Is privacy still relevant in the modern age?

Is privacy still relevant in the modern age? That is the question being debated by Crime and Justice Research Centre researcher Dr Monique Mann and PhD Student Michael Wilson and Professor David Lacey.

The OAIC’s Deputy Commissioner, Angelene Falk, will open the event, with the Queensland Privacy Commissioner, Philip Green, taking on the role of debate moderator.

If you have been wondering about the relevance of privacy, register now to secure your spot. This event is co-hosted with the Institute for Future Environments at QUT.


Tuesday 13 March 2018 at 6:00pm

The Forum (P419)
P Block, Level 4, QUT Gardens Point Campus, Brisbane, Queensland 4000

Register here:

Publication: “Sleeping the deep, deep sleep – the Hierarchy of Disaster” – Dr. Dean Biron

School of Justice affiliated academic Dr Dean Biron has published a new essay titled “Sleeping the deep, deep sleep.” Co-written with Dr Suzie Gibson of Charles Sturt University, the piece appears in Issue 229 of Overland Literary Journal:

Subtitled “The Hierarchy of Disaster,” the essay considers how human-made catastrophes are ordered so as to distinguish between worthy and unworthy victims. Commencing with a comparison of political and media responses to the 2001 terrorist attacks in the US and the 1984 Bhopal tragedy in India, the essay considers how many traumatic occurrences are elided from the collective memory and justice is denied to those victims of disasters which occur beyond the “self-reverent gaze” of Western society. It concludes by suggesting that the starting point to diminishing this hierarchy, and in turn confronting the ubiquity of disaster itself, must be an ethical recalibration on the part of first world governments.

In recent months Dean has also published work in The Guardian, The Conversation, Popular Music and Society and Metro Screen Journal.

Dean is currently coordinating the QUT Justice undergraduate subject ‘Deviance.’

In the media: “They are calculating: What makes women kill their partners”


Congratulations to QUT School of Justice sessional academic Dr Belinda Parker, who appeared in discussing her thesis “Seven Deadly Sins – developing a situational understanding of homicide event motive”  – the seven motives that characterize solved homocides, based on the analysis of 149 Australian murders.

Read the full article here:

Belinda’s PhD was supervised by Professor John Scott and Dr Claire Ferguson from QUT School of Justice.




Crime and Justice Research Centre Seminar Series – Doing Research in the Indigenous space – Associate Professor Hilde Tubex

Crime and Justice Research Centre Seminar Series with speaker Associate Professor Hilde Tubex
Topic: Doing Research in the Indigenous Space

Date:         Tuesday 13 February 2018
When:       4.00pm – 5.30pm
Venue:      C Block, level 4, room C412,
QUT Gardens Point Campus,
2 George Street, Brisbane

Register:  by Thursday 8 February 2018
by accepting calendar invitation or Emailing

Over the last years, the focus of Assoc Professor Tubex’s research has been on Indigenous Peoples in the criminal justice system. Being a criminologist / penologist, this focus is not surprising, given the enormous overrepresentation of Indigenous Peoples in our punitive system. She has built experience over three research projects; starting with the ARC Future Fellowship in which she studied different penal cultures within Australia, based on the different imprisonment rates between Australian jurisdictions, with a particular focus on Indigenous overrepresentation. In this research she studied the causes of Indigenous offending and their presence in the criminal justice system from a theoretical perspective, followed by field work in the Kimberley in WA and Darwin and Alice Springs in the NT. In an ARC Linkage she is CI on a project investigating the validity of risk assessment tools for Indigenous sex offenders. Her specific role is to assist in the development of a methodology to establish culturally appropriate risk assessment tools, alongside an Indigenous psychologist and an Indigenous reference group. She recently completed a CRG funded project on building effective throughcare strategies for Indigenous offenders in WA and the NT, for which they did fieldwork in regional and remote communities in the Kimberley, Darwin, Alice Springs and the Tiwi Islands. They conducted 38 interviews involving 59 people from these communities and their service providers, using yarning as a data collection tool. However, doing research in the Indigenous space, being a non-Indigenous person, is not evident. In this presentation Assoc Professor Tubex would like to share her experiences over these projects and discuss consequences for practice and theory building

Associate Professor Hilde Tubex
Hilde Tubex is Associate Professor and Deputy Head of School, Research at the Law School of the University of Western Australia. Her areas of expertise are comparative criminology, and penal policy, Indigenous peoples and the criminal justice system. Between 2007 and 2011, she worked at the Department of Corrective Services in WA as Team Leader Research and Evaluation. Before migrating to Australia, Hilde worked as a researcher/lecturer at the Free University of Brussels, and as an advisor to the Belgian Minister of Justice and the Council of Europe.


US warrants could be used to access Australian data

CJRC member Dr Monique Mann spoke to the ABC today about the upcoming US Supreme Court case US v Microsoft Ireland.

This case has global significance as the US government’s position would effectively undermine the data protection and privacy laws of other countries by giving the US government the power to unilaterally seize data no matter where it is located (and without regard for laws protecting that data).

Dr Mann and Dr Ian Warren (Deakin University) examine this case in their chapter in the recently published Palgrave Handbook of Criminology and the Global South.

In Dr Mann’s role as Co-Chair of the Surveillance Committee and Director of the Australian Privacy Foundation she led Australian efforts to join an Amicus Brief by Privacy International in a coalition of 25 international human and digital rights organisations in support of Microsoft in the US Supreme Court case.

To read the chapter click here.

To read the ABC article click here.