Workshop: Coercive Control

  1.  Kate Fitz-Gibbon
  2. Sandra Walklate
  3. Rachel Neil
  4. Refreshments following Coercive Control
  5. Book Launch – CJRC staff

Last week the Crime and Justice Research Centre and School of Justice hosted a workshop on ‘Coercive Control‘.  The purpose of this workshop was to examine the efficacy of the implementation of recent legislation alongside subjecting this concept to further critical interrogation with a view to examining its potential for other jurisdictions.

The workshop panel discussed the concept of Coercive Control from different points of view and applications, giving the audience a well-rounded perspective on the topic.

Speakers included Kate Fitz-Gibbon, a Senior Lecturer in Criminology at Monash University, and a member of the Monash Gender and Family Violence Research Program. Her research examines family violence, the law of homicide, youth justice and the impact of criminal law reform across Australian and international jurisdictions.

Rachel Neil is the Principal Solicitor of the Women’s Legal Service (WLS). Rachel is passionate about providing vulnerable women with high quality legal support and working towards a future where all women are free from violence.

Sandra Walklate is Eleanor Rathbone Chair of Sociology at the University of Liverpool (U.K.), co-joint Chair of Criminology at Monash University and an Adjunct Professor at the QUT School of Justice. She is currently Editor in Chief of the British Journal of Criminology and in July 2018 becomes president elect of the British Criminology Society. She is internationally recognised for her work on criminal victimisation (including terrorism) and gender and violence.

The event proved very popular with approximately 100 registered.

Following the event there was a celebration of books recently published by Crime and Justice Research Centre members since 2016.

 

 

 

Seminar: Critical skills for critical minds: recognizing evidence manipulation in death investigations

CJRC member, Dr Claire Ferguson, recently spoke at an Australian Institute of Professional Intelligence Officers seminar at QPS Headquarters on the topic of “Critical skills for critical minds:  recognizing evidence manipulation in death investigations”.  This event was held at Queensland Police Headquarters.

Claire spoke about key critical thinking skills in the context of death investigation examples, including the important Leahy/Arnold double murder case in North Queensland.

Claire used this and other examples to examine offenders and scenes that successfully fooled investigators and how and why the critical thinking process failed.  Common problems such as bias, observer effects, metacognitive errors and logical mistakes were considered and discussed with a view to demonstrating the critical thinking skills required for successful investigations and intelligence gathering.

This event was the largest turnout AIPIO have ever had, with 80 guests in attendance.

 

 

 

Publication: The limits of (digital) constitutionalism: Exploring the privacy-security (im)balance in Australia

Crime and Justice Research Centre members Dr Monique Mann and Dr Angela Daly, along with Justice PhD Candidate Michael Wilson, and QUT Law Associate Professor Nic Suzor recently published ‘The limits of (digital) constitutionalism: Exploring the privacy-security (im)balance in Australia’ in the International Communication Gazette.

 Abstract

This article explores the challenges of digital constitutionalism in practice through a case study examining how concepts of privacy and security have been framed and contested in Australian cyber security and telecommunications policy-making over the last decade. The Australian Government has formally committed to ‘internet freedom’ norms, including privacy, through membership of the Freedom Online Coalition (FOC). Importantly, however, this commitment is non-binding and designed primarily to guide the development of policy by legislators and the executive government. Through this analysis, we seek to understand if, and how, principles of digital constitutionalism have been incorporated at the national level. Our analysis suggests a fundamental challenge for the project of digital constitutionalism in developing and implementing principles that have practical or legally binding impact on domestic telecommunications and cyber security policy. Australia is the only major Western liberal democracy without comprehensive constitutional human rights or a legislated bill of rights at the federal level; this means that the task of ‘balancing’ what are conceived as competing rights is left only to the legislature. Our analysis shows that despite high-level commitments to privacy as per the Freedom Online Coalition, individual rights are routinely discounted against collective rights to security. We conclude by arguing that, at least in Australia, the domestic conditions limit the practical application and enforcement of digital constitutionalism’s norms.

Keywords

Cyber security, digital constitutionalism, human rights, metadata retention, online surveillance, privacy, security, securitization

You can read the full article here: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1748048518757141?journalCode=gazb#articleShareContainer

 

 

New Publication – Understanding Romance Fraud: Insights from Domestic Violence Literature

 Cassandra Cross, Molly Dragiewicz and Kelly Richards have recently had an article published in the British Journal of Criminology. The article is the first to examine romance fraud from within the framework of psychological abuse, as established in domestic violence research.

 Abstract

Romance fraud affects thousands of victims globally, yet few scholars have studied it. The dynamics of relationships between victims and offenders are not well understood, and the effects are rarely discussed. This article adapts the concept of psychological abuse from studies of domestic violence to better understand romance fraud. Using interviews with 21 Australian romance fraud victims, we show how offenders use non-violent tactics to ensure compliance with ongoing demands for money. This article identifies similarities and differences between domestic violence and romance fraud. We argue that thinking through domestic violence and romance fraud together offers potential benefits to both bodies of research.

 The full article can be found here

 

 

QUT’s Graduate Certificate in Domestic Violence in the news

The Sydney Morning Herald ran a story about graduate education about domestic violence in Australia. A new weapon in the fight against family violence by Jane Gilmore was published 20 March 2018. The article features quotes from QUT’s Graduate Certificate in Domestic Violence alumni. For more information about the units in the Graduate Certificate in Domestic Violence click here.

Recently published: 2nd edition of the Routledge Handbook of Critical Criminology

The 2nd edition of the Routledge Handbook of Critical Criminology, edited by CJRC Adjunct Professor Walter S. DeKeseredy and CJRC Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz was published on 17 March 2018. The updated edition includes forty chapters and more than a dozen contributions by CJRC staff and adjunct professors such as:

Left realism: a new look (Walter S. DeKeseredy and Martin D. Schwartz)
Southern criminology (Kerry Carrington, Russell Hogg, and Maximo Sozzo)
Masculinities and Crime (James W. Messerschmidt and Stephen Tomsen)
Queer criminology (Carrie Buist, Emily Lenning, and Matthew Ball)
Critical Green criminology (Rob White)
Green cultural criminology (Avi Brisman and Nigel South)
Towards a Criminology of War, Violence and Militarism (Ross McGarry and Sandra Walklate)
Terrorism. The Problem with Radicalization: Overlooking the elephants in the room (Sandra Walklate and Gaybe Mythen)
Thinking critically about contemporary adult pornography and woman abuse (Walter S. DeKeseredy and Amanda Hall-Sanchez)
Antifeminism and backlash: a critical criminological imperative (Molly Dragiewicz)
A critical examination of girls’ violence and juvenile justice (Meda Chesney-Lind and Lisa Pasko)
The future of a critical rural criminology (Joseph F. Donnermeyer)
Violence and social policy (Elliott Currie)
Confronting adult pornography (Walter DeKeseredy)

An Author meets critics session will be held at the American Society of Criminology meetings in Atlanta, Georgia in November 2018.

QUT School of Justice Biennial Breakfast

QUT School of Justice staff

Facts and figures on family violence initiated conversation at this morning’s QUT School of Justice Biennial Breakfast.

This year’s guest speaker, The Hon. Marcia Neave AO focused on the Queensland Government ‘Not Now, Not Ever’ report and how we can all contribute to prevention of violence, support for victims and children, and holding those who use violence to account.

“Family violence is dramatically underreported and those cases largely focus on physical abuse,” Ms Neave said.

“We don’t have decent figures on things like psychological and technological abuse.”

More than 120 justice and law professionals and academic staff enjoyed a buffet breakfast while they came together to discuss the effect of family violence on society and recent Queensland Court Reform initiatives.

The Hon. Marcia Neave AO has had a varied career as a judge, lawyer, academic and public policy maker, and has held highly regarded positions as former Chair of the Royal Commission into Family Violence and former Judge of the Court of Appeal, Supreme Court of Victoria.

It was these experiences that Ms Neave drew on most during her address, particularly acknowledging the findings of the Royal Commission and the actions undertaken by the Victorian Government since, which can be translated across to the Queensland system.

 

 

Research Showcase – Queensland Police Service

On the 8th March the Crime and Justice Research Centre was invite to deliver a Research Showcase at Queensland Police Service. The event, hosted by Frontline Research and information, Organisational Capability Command at QPS and facilitated by our QUT Police Fellow, Inspector Chris Emzin.

Four CJRC members: Professor Kerry Carrington, Dr Cassandra Cross, Dr Claire Ferguson and Associate Professor Mark Lauchs presented their work to the QPS cohort, to highlight and share work conducted at QUT.

Professor Carrington discussed the policing of gendered violence in the Global South, focusing on the innovative approach of women’s only police stations in Latin America and possible applications in the Australian context. Her ARC Discovery project with Professor Maximo Sozzo will explore the prevention of gendered violence; lessons from the Global South.

Dr Cross reflected on her work with online fraud which she began while working for the Queensland Police Service, and her Churchill Fellowship which extends this work and the challenges police and victims face when responding to fraud. She also outlined her current projects and future research directions in the field of cybercrime, digital crime, fraud and romance fraud.

Dr Ferguson spoke on her fascinating research and consultancy in the field of forensic criminology, offender evidence manipulation at homicide scenes, how police can combat these efforts and processes of determining death in complex cases. She outlined her research in Australian jurisdictions and beyond, on strategies offenders use and features police can use to combat these efforts.

Associate Professor Mark Lauchs’s presentation covered his work on organised crime and outlaw motorcycle groups. He summarised strategies researching these fields in Australia, with limited data in the public domain; how to redress knowledge gaps and explore the ‘organised’ component of crime as well as impacts on the community.

Thank you to the team and to Chris for facilitating what was, we hope, the first of a series of research events with Queensland Police. We look forward to exploring future research collaborations and initiatives with QPS.

 

Publication: The legal geographies of transnational cyber-prosecutions: Extradition, human rights and forum shifting

Crime and Justice Research Centre member Dr Monique Mann, along with Deakin University colleagues Dr Ian Warren and Ms Sally Kennedy, recently published ‘The legal geographies of transnational cyber-prosecutions: Extradition, human rights and forum shifting’ in the leading international (Q1) journal Global Crime.

The article describes legal and human rights issues in three cases of transnational online offending involving extradition requests by the United States (US). These cases were selected as all suspects claimed the negative impacts of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) were sufficient to deny extradition on human rights grounds. The authors demonstrate how recent developments in UK and Irish extradition law raise human rights and prosecutorial challenges specific to online offending that are not met by established protections under domestic and internationally sanctioned approaches to extradition, or human rights, law. In these cases, although the allegedly unlawful conduct occurred exclusively online and concurrent jurisdiction enables prosecution at both the source and location of harm, the authors demonstrate why national courts hearing extradition challenges are extremely reluctant to shift the trial forum. They conclude by discussing the implications of the new geographies of online offending for future criminological research and transnational criminal justice.

Keywords: Extradition, computer hacking, legal geography, human rights, autism spectrum disorders, Asperger’s syndrome.

The article can be accessed at this link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17440572.2018.1448272?journalCode=fglc20&

Professor John Scott keynote at Indian National Justice Conference

Professor Scott is presented with gifts by Professor Sibnath Deb, Dean of Law, Pondicherry University.

Professor John Scott has recently returned from Puducherry (a part of French India until 1954), India where he presented a keynote conference paper on the theme of ‘Southern criminology and cognitive justice’.  The two day conference, organized by the School of Law, Pondicherry University (A Central University), examined The Role of Law Enforcement Authorities and Government in Upholding Justice. Distinguished presenters at the national conference included Justice N. Santosh Hegde (Former Judge, Supreme Court of India), Justice Indira Banerjee (Chief Justice of Madras High Court, Chennai), Justice Ravi R. Tripathi (Law Commission, Government of India) and Mr. V. Narayanswamy (Chief Minister, Puducherry Union Territory).  Scott made the case for a globally inclusive criminology noting that Australian, US and British textbooks ignored crime in the Subcontinent. This was especially striking in the case of Australia and Britain given the shared legal, social and political history. He argued that the extent of neglect exposed a bias in the way in which criminological knowledge was produced and disseminated and discussed the historic development of criminology in India and its growth over the last few decades. Major themes of the conference included access to justice, human rights, the role of police and political corruption. Approximately 200 people attended the conference.