Interning with Japanese Football League

Morgan K, Bachelor Business – International

Internship with the Japanese Football League (June – July 2017)

New Colombo Plan mobility and internship grant recipient 

In the second semester of 2016 I took the opportunity within my BS08 degree to exchange to Rikkyo University, Ikebukuro, Japan.  This study aboard experience will last for 11 months. For my exchange I was lucky enough to be awarded the New Colombo Plan mobility grant. The New Colombo Plan is an Australian Government initiative to support Australian undergraduate students to study aboard and take internships within the Asian Pacific Region. This opportunity has allowed me the prospect of undertaking an internship whist studying full time.

Outside J. League headquarters office

I am presently interning within the Japanese Football League (J. League), in the Sales Management and Marketing division. As my major is within International Business, I have always wanted to see first-hand how business is conducted in Japan. The internship position interested me as this organisation is world renowned, would allow me the opportunity to learn first-hand about management and operation of the professional football league and how to engage a multitude of stakeholders.

The J. League is a multifaceted organisation whose mission is to enhance the level of Japanese football by the diffusion of the game through Professional football. Therefore, helping foster a sporting culture which contributes to the broader international exchange and friendships.

Throughout my internship I was based in the J. League office in Tokyo only a 15-minute journey from Ikebukuro station. I undertook this internship opportunity part time as still completing studies at Rikkyo University full time. The J. League division where very flexible and enabled me to intern two days a week allowing me to balance my busy student schedule in association to the tasks given to me.

Ajinomoto Stadium half time break watching the friendly match

This opportunity has allowed me to use my analytical skills taught to me throughout my degree in this work environment. The tasks given to me to date include the opportunity to see a live match between Japan versus Syria and write a report on match day experience, research tasks into sporting industries and analysis of present market forces. I have always had an active interest within sports and have played soccer throughout high school and enjoy cheering for our national side the Socceroo’s. The J. League internship to date has allowed me to see, engage and give my input into this rapidly changing dynamic environment.

On my second day into the internship I was given an amazing research task opportunity. Whereby I could see live, Japan’s national team, Samurai Blue verses the Syria national team in a friendly match at Ajinomoto Stadium. It was an amazing experience whereas 43,000 people were in attendance, the roar and chants of the fans, organisation of the event and stadium facilities where beyond my expectations and gave me a unique insight into the Japanese sporting culture.

By taking this extraordinary opportunity it has given me a new awareness into the tireless, passionate and hardworking dedication by the staff in the J. League. I have a new found respect and admiration and am personally looking forward to the FIFA World Cup Qualifiers in August between Australia and Japan.

Find out more about how to apply for a New Colombo Plan mobility grant at QUT here.

My Internship Experience

Hi, my name is Tiffanie and I’m scared of sharks, women who wear white pants, snakes, tall people, running out of hand sanitiser, sea cucumbers, crying children, weak handshakes, cane toads, 4s, accidentally swallowing gum, the Caboolture line and my own shadow (no, I’m not scared of spiders – don’t be ridiculous).

So you’d be correct in assuming that, upon hearing I’d managed to organise an internship, I was mildly terrified. What if I hated the work? What if I hated the people? What if I broke something important? What if I offended all their clients? What if I was wasting my time and money?

You see, realistically, the internship had very little to do with what I’m studying. I’m a second year journalism student, and I undertook my internship with a Queensland based trade organisation, who have offices worldwide (including in Tokyo, where I worked). These two fields have about as much in common as a hedgehog and a spoon. And yet, during my albeit short stint in the office, I was able to acquire and/or practice skills that are universally desired in the job market.

            The view from the office that I worked in

I primarily performed administration and research tasks applicable to the Queensland education, resources and agriculture sectors while in the office. I did everything from filing and making cups of tea, to attending an event at the Australian embassy, and researching opportunities for the practical application of drones in Queensland. However, through it all, I was able to develop and practice skills and qualities that are essential in any workplace, such as; teamwork, communication, attention to detail, organisation and time management.

Within 48 hours of starting my internship, all my fears were calmed. The work I was tasked with, although not something I’d usually do, was interesting; the people I worked with were welcoming and willing to work with me, even though I had no previous experience and my Japanese skills were severely lacking; and, above all else, this experience was not even close to a waste of my time and money.

For anyone considering undertaking an internship, whether domestically or abroad, I could not recommend it more. If you throw yourself into it and make the most of every opportunity to learn, you’ll come out the side with learning outcomes that are applicable to literally any field. Honestly, if I enjoyed it, you’re bound to also. At the very least, you come out of it with an experience to add to your CV and impress future employers with.

Sincerely,
Tiffanie.

Three months in Tuvalu

Kate Donnelly: New Colombo Plan Scholar interning in Tuvalu

We took our descent into the tiny capital of Tuvalu twice. The flight from Suva passed quickly enough, until the seat belt sign flicked on. The plane began to sink closer and closer to the gun-metal grey surface of the Pacific Ocean, dsc_0001at a rate exactly converse to my panic as I searched below for any sign of land. Seemingly out of nowhere, I caught the first sight of waves breaking. The tip of the islet widened just enough to support a handful of coconut trees, and then some shanty houses, and eventually the central district of a town with barely 200 meters between the lagoon shore and its ocean side.        

Locking eyes with locals who’d come out of their houses to watch the arrival, and bracing myself for our landing (5 seconds, 4, 3, 2…) the plane suddenly veered upwards and away from the runway we’d been so close to hitting. Five confused minutes passed before the pilot’s voice nonchalantly crackled over the speakers: we’d be descending again soon, not to worry, just as soon as air control confirmed that the authorities had successfully run down a pack of dogs that had strayed onto the tarmac. Until then, enjoy the view. With plenty of swearing and full-bellied chuckles from the Tuvaluans on board, we circled back and touched down in the world’s fourth smallest nation.dsc_0003

At this point, you’re probably wondering where on earth this country is. Hop on Google Earth satellite view, and search for Funafuti. I got goosebumps the first time I saw the capital like that – it seemed so vulnerable, a tiny crescent of land built up over millions of years from the broken down coral reefs that rimmed ancient ocean volcanoes – but the birds-eye perspective has nothing on the feeling you get when you first stand at the tip of the islet. On your right, there’s the crystal-blue water of the salt-water lagoon. On your left, the heaving inky waves of the Pacific. It’s unlike anything else. dsc_0015

I spent three months interning with the Tuvalu Association of Non-Governmental Organisations (TANGO), supported by the Australian Government’s New Colombo Plan. In the tiny box of TANGO’s office, I wrote Cabinet Papers and delivered training workshops, developed project management tools, and memorised the words to Tuvalu’s favourite reggae remixes. Timelines were short, plans inevitably fell through or changed at the very last minute, higher decisions didn’t make sense, our internet never worked and my laptop died in the humidity of my second week. Improvisation became my most valuable tool, and relationships my greatest asset. I can’t even begin to tell you how much this country rewrote me.

It might have been the ocean breeze, the mandatory midday siestas to escape thedsc_0023 sluggish heat, or the easy-goes approach of every person I worked with, but somewhere along the way I changed my tune. From the busyness and competition of making every minute a productive one, I slipped into days that moved slowly with the sun. Life became just that again – not endless work, not long commutes nor unshakeable exhaustion. Just life. I swam and listened and made friends and stumbled upon a secret.

Tuvalu is a country whose future is a woven basket of unknowns, made and remade around the changing advice of scientists and foreign diplomats but held together by the stories and pride of generations of island people. When today is what you’ve got, you savour it unapologetically and fight hard so that your kids might do the same.

dsc_0016And that’s just it. From Tuvalu, to me, to you: slow down enough to enjoy what’s precious, then give your best to preserve it. From Australian or atoll shores, I can’t imagine doing life any other way.dsc_0028dsc_0013

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