Experiencing Danish ‘Hygge’

Tayen L. Bachelor of Business
University of Aarhus, Denmark (Semester 1, 2018)

International Dinner in Our Backyard

Exchange feedback… Wow! Where do I even begin? First of all, for my exchange experience, I chose to go to Aarhus university in Denmark and I’m so glad that I chose it, as I have met some amazing people and had some really life changing experiences! In my opinion, Aarhus does not get talked about enough! It is essentially a student city where everyone is so welcoming. There are always events happening, so you don’t really have a lot of time to be homesick.

The accommodation

For my student accommodation, I was able to choose what kind of accommodation I wanted to live in. There was a choice between dormitories, apartment styles or living in a house. I remember this being quite a hard choice to make, but because I have lived out of home for many years, I decided on choosing the house option because I didn’t think I would like to live with as many people as dormitory style living offered. I assumed I’d be living with 4 or 5 others in a cute little Danish house. Boy, was I wrong! When I received my housing offer, I was granted my first choice of a Danish house… but there were going to be 12 others living in the same house! Safe to say I was a little shocked that a house could fit 13 people in it and then immediately became concerned as this was essentially what I was trying to avoid when I made my decision.

Lucky for me though, living in a house with 12 others actually turned out to be one of the most amazing experiences of my life and I have left Denmark, not just having some cool housemates, but with a global family! Everyone was so welcoming and we all soon became very close. Our house was the place to be! We would constantly have people who were living in dorms or in apartments tell us that our place was so much fun and that they were jealous of the close friendships we had all formed as housemates and that they were struggling to ‘mesh’ with their dorm or apartment mates. To any future students, I would HIGHLY recommend choosing the housing option, because the experience is amazing, and it gives you the ability to form friendships like no other! Plus, the house was a 30 minute walk to the business school or a 9 minute ride. And Danes ride their bikes everywhere, so you’ll want to be like the locals and get yourself your own bike! (You won’t regret it!).

My House

The weather

Going to Denmark in the Spring semester was incredible because I not only got to see the entire university covered in snow, but I also got to see it bloom with flowers. Two very different experiences, going from all white to all green! Although it was very cold in the winter, Danes would still get out and do things and go to bars with candles and eat nice food. All of this was a very ‘Hygge’ experience, which is the feeling of cosiness, being with good friends and can only be felt but not really explained. In the Spring, when the sun finally came out, we’d often spend our time down at the beach or going for coastal rides!

The grading system

The university system is so different to Australia, because instead of having assessments due every 6 weeks which are worth a certain percentage of your grade, they have one assignment or exam which is due at the end of the semester and is worth the entire grade. So, if you don’t pass your last assessment, then you don’t pass the entire class! I found this a little bit hard to deal with and ended up failing one of my classes I took while over there, as I’m used to the Australian system where if I don’t do quite as well in one assignment, I have a chance to make up the marks in other assessments. So that was a different experience for me! Having said that, it did allow me to really engage with the culture and enjoy the experience. The mentor program for business students was significantly better than other faculties. We had so many introduction week events and meet ups that made my experience even better!

Campus Grounds

Living in Denmark is fairly expensive, but I did find a lot of things to actually be quite similar to Australia and some things which were considerably cheaper.

TIPS:

Learn some basic Danish

Practice a little bit of Danish with Duolingo or another app that makes it easy & convenient. I can almost guarantee you won’t feel confident in speaking the language, but you will feel less overwhelmed when you walk into a supermarket for the first time as you’ll have a basic ability to read Danish (and Duolingo covers some food and basic greetings which is VERY helpful in your first and future Danish supermarket experiences!) Also, I would recommend not greeting people with “hi” as the Danish greeting is “hej” and it sounds very similar so they will assume you are Danish and speak Danish to you. This leaves the both of you feeling embarrassed when you have to tell them you only speak English! Also not learning the language is totally fine as well, as every Dane speaks perfect English, you just may have to tell them that you don’t understand Danish! So don’t stress if you don’t get a chance to learn it, you’ll pick it up as you go!

Get a bike

Seriously. Danes bike everywhere and you’ll soon learn that your fellow international classmates will always bike everywhere too because it’s easier. You don’t want to feel left out or be the only one not going somewhere because you don’t have a bike. You could always bus but this is expensive and it’s significantly faster to actually just bike to places! Also, be warned that your jeans will eventually give in and rip on the inner leg area from your constant bike rides!

Danish Houses and their Bikes

See the City

Try to get out and see more of Denmark than just the city if you can. Denmark is a really beautiful country and surprisingly has some amazing cliffs and sand dunes (despite the fact that everyone says it is a flat country with no mountains). Hire a car if possible. (Note if you do this, it is significantly more expensive if you tell them you are a temporary resident and have a CPR number, you’re much better off booking the car from your home countries website for Denmark and then applying a student discount- this will allow you to get unlimited mileage when you hire a car and will be MUCH cheaper.

Aarhus Cathedral

Embrace the Hygge

Embrace the feeling of Hygge and you’ll really get to experience what Danish culture is about. It’s a feeling that is hard to explain, but you’ll know it when you feel it. It’s cosiness. It’s friendship. It’s love & warmth. It’s hot chocolates. It’s togetherness and it is just something so hard to explain

Go to international nights & other events

They are a lot of fun and a GREAT way to form some lifelong friendships. Danes can be a little reserved and respect personal space, so going to these events is a great way to mingle with some Danes and learn about their culture first hand

Road trip to the Danish Mon Klints with my exchange friends

Go to the eat street markets

If you go to Aarhus university, Eat Street markets will become one of your go to places for meeting groups of people and enjoying great food together!

Aarhus City Centre

“Oh sorry, I don’t speak Danish!”

Savannah H, Bachelor of Business
Aarhus University, Denmark (Semester 1, 2016)

I spent 5 amazing months in Aarhus, Denmark and spent a total of 7 months abroad. As cliché as it sounds, exchange really was the best time of my life.

I studied at the Business and Social Sciences (BSS) faculty at Aarhus University. Aarhus is the second biggest city in Denmark after Copenhagen. Aarhus University was amazing, and BSS was great! BSS ran a really great introduction week, which meant I got to meet a lot of other exchange students in my first week. I lived in one of the furthest accommodations, but it still only took me about 20 minutes on bus to the campus and about 25 minutes to the city centre. The campuses were great (despite the buildings being named/numbered a bit confusingly!) The facilities were great (and it had an excellent canteen). One word I would use to describe Aarhus University and Denmark and my whole time abroad in general is “chill”. Everything was so chill.

Aarhus City Centre

Aarhus University, unlike QUT, only has final exams that count towards your grade. So no mid-sem’s. Which had its benefits and its drawbacks. One benefit being, I was able to travel throughout the semester without having to worry about assessment. The main drawback was I was pretty stressed in the last month with 3 exams all worth 100%, but overall it was fine, and let’s just say, that all you need to do on exchange is pass.

Aarhus BSS

Living in Aarhus was amazing! It is such a student city and due to the amazing introduction week, I was able to meet and constantly catch up with so many friends! I found that cost of living in Aarhus was pretty similar to Australia. I paid about $600 a month for my accommodation (private studio apartment with kitchen and bathroom located about 25 minutes by bus to the city centre). Groceries were comparable to Australia and I got a phone plan for $20 a month!

Kapsejladsen (Northern Europe’s biggest Student Party) held at Aarhus University

I found Denmark to be culturally pretty similar to Australia, but they do drink a lot of beer! People were nice, but sometimes seemed a bit standoffish, but as I learned, they just wanted to give you your own space. However, as soon as you asked for help or said “oh, sorry! I don’t speak Danish”, they couldn’t have helped you faster! I personally didn’t experience any culture shock or homesickness, but I know a few who did, I think to help avoid this, it’s really great if you can find a group of really close friends and try to be really active and see lots of both your host city and do a lot of travel!

Aarhus, a classic Danish scene: grey skies, a bike and colourful houses

I travelled a lot! I mean a lot a lot! Any long weekend I got, I was gone! I ended up visiting 20 countries and 36 cities. Skyscanner and RyanAir were basically my hobbies. The longest flight I took was from Billund (middle of Denmark) to Malta (small island south of Italy), and even this was only about 3 hours and we literally flew north to south over Europe! Flights were so cheap as were buses and trains and hostels! A quick tip: If you want to travel through central Europe (France, Germany, UK, Austria, etc) do so in their Winter, hostels are almost a third cheaper than travelling in their Summer. In Summer, I tried to travel though Eastern Europe where things are generally cheaper anyway. However, I did do Italy and Greece in Summer (bye money, but 100% worth it!).

Nyhavn, Copenhagen

Skagen, LegoLand and Studying in Denmark

Julie U., Bachelor of Business/Laws
Aarhus Univeristy, Denmark (Semester 1, 2016)

 

My name is Julie, I am a business and law double degree student now in my third year at QUT. In Semester 1 of this year, 2016, I went on exchange to Aarhus University in Denmark. Aarhus is the second largest city in Denmark and has a very high student population. The university attracts not only students from all over Denmark, but also from many other parts of the world. There are many exciting museums and historical places to see in Aarhus, including the popular Aros museum with a 360 degree view of the city.

The university campuses of Aarhus university encompass many of the facilities we are used to at QUT, but the buildings and lecture rooms are less modern. Students in Denmark spend a lot more time on Campus then I would say majority of QUT students do. Reasons for this most likely being that Aarhus is a much smaller city, students generally live 10-15 minutes by bike or less from the university, tuition is free and students are paid government grants in excess of AU$1000 per month to study which means less need for part time work. I also found that I had a lot more contact hours in Aarhus, and there was more self-paced work that you don’t receive credit for as the final exams are all worth 100% of your grade.

The international student organization at Aarhus university was really good at running events to keep international students connected, and held weekly parties for to mix and mingle with other international students as well as some Danish students. The introduction week at Aarhus was a blast and the friends I made in that first week were with me through the whole semester.

Accommodation in Aarhus was very varied. Some international students really liked the accommodation that had been delegated to them, and others were less impressed. I had one roommate in a fairly modern apartment building that was a little further away from the center of town than I wanted but the facilities at the apartment were great and I had friends who lived close by.

Denmark is a Scandinavian country, and therefore not a cheap place to live. Not everything is expensive though. Alcohol is ridiculously cheap compared to what we are used to here in Australia. Getting take-away on the other hand is quite pricey, so you need to learn to cook your own meals most nights. Lunch at the University canteen is however good value for money and allows you to try traditional Danish dishes and other warm, home cooked meals that keep you going during the freezing winter months.

 

That brings me onto the next subject, weather. I began my exchange in January, it was very cold compared to what I am used to, but the snow made it an exciting change. After the snow period however came the rainy, dark and cold period. The weather did get a little depressing at times during the winter but the summer time in Denmark and Europe was well worth it. The sun is up until very late in the evenings and there is plenty of things to see and do around Aarhus outdoors.

The highlights of my exchange trip are difficult to narrow down, but would include; Trips to Skagen and Legoland, exploring Copenhagen and traveling around Europe with other exchange students, riding my bike everywhere around Aarhus and finding the love of my life who I convinced to move to Australia with me.

A Year in the Land of Hygge!

Marcus F. Bachelor of Business and Bachelor of Creative Industries
Copenhagen Business School (Semester 2, 2017) and University of Copenhagen (Semester 1, 2018)

For the past year, I have embarked on a two-semester exchange in Denmark, the home of Nordic Noir, Danish design, pleasing pastries, and the omnipresent ‘hygge’ – or cosiness. Slightly unusually and thanks to QUT’s Exchange Office being very flexible, I was able to attend classes at both Copenhagen Business School and the University of Copenhagen. This allowed me to experience units relating to both halves of my double degree.

At both universities, the classes and standard of assessment I took was relatively similar to what I’ve experienced at QUT. However, in Denmark there is a much greater focus on independent learning and conversational input during class whereby students are encouraged to contribute their opinion on the content raised. Something to note is that the majority of classes are not recorded and so it’s a good idea to try and attend lectures and tutorials as much as possible! Specifically, while away I studied Visual Communication, Marketing: The Essentials and Trend Drivers, Consumer Behaviour and Statistics at CBS and Scandinavian Film and Television, and Digital Strategic Communication at KU.

One real difficulty for many exchange students, particularly in Copenhagen, is sourcing accommodation due to the limited availability of rooms as well as financial cost. Fortunately, I made sure to get onto the booking system as soon as possible and during my first semester I lived at Kathrine Kollegiet in Frederiksberg and Bikuben Kollegiet in Islands Brygge during the second semester. Both rooms were located in close proximity to the universities and were very spacious, containing a small kitchenette and en-suite bathroom. It was really interesting to be able to live with both a mix of different exchange students during the first semester as well as primarily Danish students during my second semester.

Upon arrival in Copenhagen the city’s beauty really struck me, with clean streets and a striking mix of contemporary and traditional buildings stretching as far as the eye could see! After a long and chilly winter, the city really comes alive with everyone leaving work early to enjoy the long summer evenings by the canals or barbecuing in one of the many parks or at the beach.

Like Amsterdam, Copenhagen is a very cycle-friendly city and I would really recommend purchasing a bike at the start of your stay. It’s a worthy investment in the environment and overall fitness (to work off those Danish pastries) with the added bonus of reducing reliance on public transport. One of my favourite experiences was when my friends and I completed a 50km circuit around the outskirts of city to see the ‘Forgotten Giants’ an installation by Danish artist Thomas Dambo consisting of large wooden giants dotted around in a number of spots in the forest.

In my opinion, Copenhagen is a highly liveable city and you are never short of things to do. However, a benefit for me and many of the other students I met was also the ability to travel easily to other destinations in Denmark and Sweden as well as wider Europe. A couple of real highlights for me were an Easter cruise to St Petersburg, via Helsinki which was organised by the Erasmus Student Network as well as a holiday on the small Danish island of Bornholm.

Whilst it may sound clichéd, my year in Copenhagen has truly been the experience of a lifetime. The opportunity to meet such a variety of people and experience life in a completely foreign city has been invaluable to me and undeniably been beneficial for both personal and professional development. I’m really looking forward to going back in future!

A Guide to Life at Aarsus University

Mathew Verwater, Bachelor of Business/laws

Short-term program: “Experience Summer at Aarhus University”

Denmark (July/August 2018)

Host University

  1. Academics

Aarhus University similarities with QUT:

–          Summer course classes are similar to workshops (where lectures and tutorials are combined into one class and where the lecturer asks students question and discusses the topic and thoughts on news relating to a topic),

–          Summer courses required students (in law) to read the articles and textbook readings,

–          No mandatory class attendance

Aarhus University differences with QUT:

–          Classes are not recorded and thus, not attending lectures is disadvantageous as some important information id discussed in the subject,

–          Students are required to complete out-of-class work (I completed 3 or 4 different out-of-class work throughout the course)

Attending the summer course classes at Aarhus University, I think, felt very similar to high school classes as the lecturer would ask the students questions and to discuss a topic and thoughts on news

  1. Accommodation

When I was in Denmark, I stayed in the Snogebæksvej dormitory. The dormitory, I think, is like most Australian dormitories.

List of facilities in the Snogebæksvej dormitory:

–          It had a communal kitchen (residents were expected to prepare their own meals),

–          Kitchen, you share your mini fridge with one other person, thus, if you cook a lot it may be difficult to fit both your food and the other’s

–          14 rooms per floor (two floors),

–          Toilet, shower and bedroom with two tables, one cupboard, a desk lamp, and bed (without sheets, blankets, and pillow protector.

–          There was also an apple tree outside the kitchen, so you can get apples for free.

  1. Life on Campus

Aarhus University is a very large university and has buildings located throughout Aarhus. Similar to QUT giving each building a letter, each building at Aarhus University is numbered (for example, mine was number 1451). Each building has about three floors and access to the roof. Classes were three to four times a week (from 9am – 1pm) Each campus, unlike QUT, has its own self-serve cafeteria serving breakfast and lunch. Similar to a buffet. Each plate of food costs approximately $8 and coffee costs approximately $5.50. Once, during each summer semester, the university hands out ice cream to everyone at the university. Life on the campus is similar to life at QUT. So, it’s not that different from what you usually would do at QUT.

It is a large university with buildings throughout Aarhus.

A beautiful Country

Host Country

Denmark is a beautiful country, Aarhus is similar to Brisbane in terms of a mix between nature and city. There are a lot more brick houses and apartments compared to Brisbane. Aarhus also has a lot of places to visit such as the deer park, Moesgaard museum, and the beach. Also, everyone besides senior citizens can speak English so it’s very easy to get around or buy things. However, I do warn that Denmark is quite expensive, so make sure you bring a lot of cash.

There are a lot more brick houses in Aarhus compared to Brisbane.

Aarhus has a lot of places to visit, but it is quite expensive.

Highlights

Visiting Copenhagen and the Viking moot were definitely the highlights of the trip. Copenhagen is the capital of Denmark and has many beautiful sights and places to visit, such as Nyhavn, the Opera House, Christiansborg Palace, and the National Museum of Denmark. The Viking moot was an amazing social program. The Viking moot consisted of watching re-enactments of battles and horse riding. There was also a lot of cool things to buy for friends and yourself at the Viking moot.

Nyhavn in Copenhagen.

A Dream Experience in Denmark

Ellie Lawler, Bachelor of Behavioural Science (Psychology)/Social Work

Short-term program: “Experience Summer at Aarhus University”

Denmark (July 2018)

For my short study program, I chose to study at Aarhus University in Denmark. Studying abroad has been on my bucket list for years, but I always thought I’d never be able to do it. Then, I found out about the short study programs that QUT offered. I didn’t even think about it, I instantly told my parents I was going to study overseas and began searching for which country I would go to. Not long after I began my search, I found the AU summer program at Aarhus University in Denmark.

The beautiful city of Aarhus. The view from the ARoS museum.

 

View of Aarhus from the Tivoli Friheden.

 

I studied an intensive class about youth, alcohol and drugs. At QUT, I study psychology and social work, so this subject fit in nicely with my degree’s units.  I had so many expectations in my mind about what the class would be and it beat them all. My class consisted of around 30 students from all different countries. There were at least 10 different nationalities in the classroom. The different cultures made the subjects content even better. Everyone had their own experiences and laws regarding alcohol and drug use in their universities. The atmosphere was open and people weren’t afraid to share their thoughts.  Nearly every day, we had a new guest lecturer come in and present us with new information. Of course, the methods were quite different from QUT so I had to adjust a lot but I appreciated seeing new learning techniques.

A Danish norm… riding bikes everywhere

The array of perspectives was probably the most interesting part of the class. There was never a boring day.  As a short program, the work load could sometimes be intense. Luckily, the staff and other students were supportive and I got through it all.  During my study, I stayed in a University run apartment building near the beautiful harbour of Aarhus. It was a modern building, equipped with everything I needed. The campus had one of Denmark’s biggest libraries, so there was never a lack of study materials. And when studying got too hard, us students just went to play games (like foosball or ping pong) or even do some boxing in the libraries chill out level. Great idea for QUT hey?…

Aarhus university buildings – One of Denmark’s largest library’s, 8 stories.

The summer staff at Aarhus University were amazing. They had created the best social program for everyone enrolled in summer uni. This included events like concerts, day trips to theme parks, food nights and so much more. Basically, anything there was to do in Aarhus, we did it. And there was a lot to do. My favourite day by far was my final day in Aarhus… the Viking Moot! Who wouldn’t love to pretend to be Vikings right? I rode Icelandic horses, shopped in the old-fashioned markets, took some turns at archery and got to witness the ‘Vikings’ battle. And of course, at the end of the day, I had my daily dose of education…. A trip to the history museum.

A shot of the ‘Vikings’ practising for battle during Aarhus’s 2018 Viking Moot.

 Through my class and the social activities, I made so many friends from different countries. I was fortunate enough to have a great group of friends over there. We attended the social programs together, cooked together and tried to figure out the language together. We even travelled to some more of Europe together on our days off. In total, I travelled to four other countries during my holiday (I mean ‘study experience’…). I went to Germany, Sweden, Hungary and Czech Republic. Being in Europe was great. Instead of an hour taking me from Brisbane to the Gold Coast, it could take me to a whole new country. The cultures that I experienced on my travels were so interesting, I tried to immerse myself into every new experience. This mostly means that I ate a lot of food, but also that I became the biggest cliché tourist.

A Danish picnic to celebrate my birthday

Denmark can be a pricey country, but studying abroad is a once in a life time opportunity so I never limited myself to experiencing things. The University made it all as cheap as possible for the students. This included cheap rent and great student deals. Overall, my experience in Denmark was a dream. Aarhus University was an amazing host University and I got to experience so many things. I only wish that it was longer. I know that I’ll be travelling back to Denmark for a reunion one day.

Nyhavn, Copenhagen.

A Summer Spent in the City of Smiles

Madison Brittain, Bachelor of Creative Industries

Short-term program: “Experience Summer at Aarhus University”

Denmark (July 2018)

During July 2018, I participated in a summer semester at Aarhus University in Denmark. Where I studied Social Marketing as an intensive 2-week course. Aarhus is the largest and second oldest university in Denmark, the city is known for its young demographic and happy people. Aarhus, also known as Smilets (City of Smiles), was voted as the European Capital of Culture for 2017 where it’s legacy still lives on.

Aarhus University is a very dispersed university, with many of the classrooms and faculties spread across the city. Many of the buildings are architecturally different from what we see at QUT, the university’s design has followed the same principle since the 1930’s of characteristic yellow-brick buildings. The university is internationally renowned for this design and has received cultural excellence awards for it. The university also boasts the tallest library in all of Denmark!

University buildings displaying the yellow-brick characteristics.

The University boasts the tallest library in Denmark.

My accommodation was on campus and only a five-minute walk from classes. The accommodation was dorm-room style with a bed, night stand, wardrobe, desk, chair, sink and mirror all provided. The kitchen and bathroom were shared with 9 other full-time study students, but they had plenty of facilities so waiting was never an issue.

I was enrolled in a course called Social Marketing where I attended class for 3 hours a day for 2 weeks straight; with 2 assignments and 1 exam as my assessment. The subject was broad but gave an insight into all the workings of social marketing. The class was made up of both local and international students which helped to give a world perspective on ways in which social marketing is used in different countries. The classes are very informal, with students and teachers being of equal ground.

An art installation of a cat pouring water into a bowl on the grounds of the university.

The university offered an amazing social program including activities like canoeing, visit’s to the Old Town, ARoS museum (which is a must), and many more activities. While I was there, the World Cup was being played out in Russia and the local community set up a massive screen by the water front for the locals to come down and watch the games. It was a great atmosphere and a great way to end the day (even If the sun didn’t set until 11pm some days).

Part of the rainbow 360 art feature at the ARoS museum.

A glimpse of the houses along the banks of the river from the canoeing trip.

The cost of living in Denmark is very similar to Australia, with drink and food prices on a similar budget. Some super-markets charge more than what you would find in Coles or Woolworths, but with the variety of supermarkets they offer, it is easy to find a cheaper price. Public transport in Aarhus is quite expensive to, as the Danes are very much a bike culture. Bikes are easy to rent out around Aarhus and a great form of exercise. Taxis are ridiculously expensive in Denmark and cost you approximately $20 to go 750m.

Danes are the nicest people around and are always willing to help you; they aren’t loud or rowdy, they do not litter or act out in public. Aarhus is an incredibly beautiful, small city with friendly locals who can all speak English amazingly. I’m grateful for my time their and would highly recommend it to anyone!

Experiencing the Culture and History of Denmark at Aarhus University

Taylah De Wit, Bachelor of Science/Laws

Short-term program: Experience Summer at Aarhus University

Denmark (July 2018)

My short-term exchange program was hosted by Aarhus University in Denmark. The campus was absolutely stunning and it had an amazing ambience. It had so many study and social places as well as beautiful gardens and was steeped in culture and history. Life on campus was quiet as it was during the summer semester for Danish students, however there were still some locals who participated in the summer courses and heaps of international students. The summer university program promoted and organised a lot of social events and opportunities for everyone to meet and socialise.

The highlight of the program was meeting people from all around the world.

In terms of the academics of the university, I really enjoyed the teaching style. For me, I had class everyday during the week for three hours. I studied Animal Law – which was the first class of its kind in Scandinavia.  It was an intensive 3-week course that created a very in-depth understanding and I had multiple guest lecturers from all around the world. This included academics from Scotland, Barcelona, the United States, Denmark, and Ireland. This created a more global perspective on the topic and created amazing networking opportunities.

In regards to the accommodation, I stayed in student housing which was located on the smaller campus of the university. The accommodation was nice and my room set-up was just a bed, wardrobe, and sink. I had to share a kitchen and bathroom with other students, which meant I got to know a lot of the local Aarhus University students.  I would really recommend student housing as it was a really fun vibe and experience.

The campus was absolutely stunning!

Aarhus is a beautiful seaside city and I absolutely loved my time there. Everything was in walking distance and all of the locals were so lovely. Everyone speaks English in Denmark so it is very easy to find your way. There is plenty to see and do but also it is a very nice place to just relax. The living expenses were similar to Australia, except for eating out at restaurants, which was quite expensive. So I would definitely recommend cooking for yourself!

The highlight of my short-term program would definitely be meeting people from all around the world. I also really enjoyed visiting the beaches, the deer park and the ARos Art Museum – the rainbow panorama skywalk was insane. If you get the opportunity I would definitely recommend going on a short-term exchange to Aarhus University.

Memorable Moments at Aarhus University

Jaqueline Hurwood, Bachelor of Science

Short-term program: Experience Summer at Aarhus University

Denmark (July 2018)

Who knew two weeks of looking at fungi on wheat crops in a tiny village in Denmark would make some of the most memorable moments of my university experience, and life? I initially had no intention of studying plant diseases at all but applied on a whim to Aarhus University’s summer program, with almost no background knowledge of plant biology or microbiology. After completion, I am now confident and capable of loads of field assessments and lab analyses and have extended my comfort in biological science unexpectedly.

Working in the lab at Aarhus.

Each week of classes had a different focus: first week introduced different fungal diseases and field identification, and the second week was lab-based analysis. Each week, a group report was due and we presented the findings informally, then we were assessed with a 20 minute oral exam at the end of the course. I’d never experienced an oral exam before, but I’ve discovered it is an amazing way to be assessed with a fraction of the stress of a standard exam. As Aarhus’ agricultural rural campus, Flakkebjerg is very small and intimate, and all the staff are friendly and approachable. The buildings are surrounded by multiple crop fields and greenhouses, all established with countless experiments, making for very scenic views and the mild summer weather made field work comfortable. The accommodation was surrounded by forest and a lake, with plenty of wildlife. There are also a number of beaches and a harbour nearby that made for exciting day trips full of bonding with other students.

Nearby beaches were perfect for day trips.

The class consisted of students from Denmark, Germany, Kenya, China and Slovakia, and I was the only Australian for the first time in my life. The small class size, constant group work and communal spaces at the accommodation made close interactions with other students necessary, and I made genuine connections. Learning about Danish welfare, the German high school system, and Slovakian history were unexpected benefits from bonding with diverse classmates.  

A memorable experience and a highlight of university at Aarhus.

The small class size meant that I made genuine connections.

English is widely spoken even in small Danish villages, but there were many situations where I was the only non-Danish speaker in a room; the first time I have experienced this in my life. Danish people are stereotypically beautiful and sarcastic and all the Danes I met definitely delivered. Denmark is one of the most expensive European countries to visit, so careful budgeting is necessary. Accommodation during the course was covered by the university, so most of my spending was on food and transport. Splitting grocery shops with other students meant that I tried a lot of new food and halved costs, and downloading the Mobilbilletter app discounted bus and train ticket costs. Since the coursework was only for two weeks, I was able to spend time visiting other European countries during my holiday, and experiencing other cultures and attractions, which made the invaluable trip even more exciting. I couldn’t recommend this summer course enough and am so grateful for the people I’ve met and things I’ve learnt in Denmark.

 

Top tips for Copenhagen

Yasmine E
Bachelor of Business
Copenhagen Business School, Denmark

 

Need a go-to guide to Copenhagen?

Yassi’s Top CPH tips:

  • Buy a good quality bike
  • Learn the basic phrases
  • Go out and enjoy everything Copenhagen has to offer, trust me there is loads
  • Grocery shop at Lidl and Netto before Fotex
  • When it’s sunny have a day on the Go Boats
  • Eat at Paper Island, Moller and Grod
  • Spend time cycling around the cool little areas like Ostebro, Norrebro and Frederiksberg

  • Use a travel card such as the QANTAS card, it’s the cheapest way to spend money, Copenhagen uses card for everything, very few places will take cash only but many are card only. I would also recommend having multiple cards in different places in cases one is lost or stolen. No need to open a Danish bank account it will be more of a struggle and it’s super easy to just use your Australian bank card it will just charge you a few cents every time you make a purchase.
  • When you arrive in Copenhagen go to Central Station and talk to the people there about what is your best option for a transport card. I personally had 2, one monthly pass that required a passport photo and it would be a once a month payment for unlimited rides on all transport in Zone 1 and 2 but I also had a Rejsekort card which is kind of like a Go Card which I would use if I was going into Zone 3 and 4. Always make sure you pay for transport because the fines are huge!
  • Get a really great everyday backpack
  • Get comfy fashionable sneakers

  • If you are going to make any big purchases make sure they are done within 3 months of leaving Europe to get your tax back at the airport
  • Go for lunch in Sweden… literally it’s like 50 minutes away!
  • Visit other cities in Denmark like Aarhus it’s a really cool town
  • The Danes are not rude just private, don’t be offended if they seem like they are keeping to themselves but if you do need anything they are really lovely.
  • Make your room feel homely, take a trip to IKEA and get little things that will make you feel more at home.
  • PORTABLE CHARGERS!!!! They will save your life! Because it gets so cold your phone will freeze and just shut down so always have a charger with you.

If you would like to know more or have any questions at all no matter how long or small feel free to add me on Facebook and ask away! You are going to have the time of your life, trust me!