Snowball fights and study at Simon Fraser University

Mikaela H
Bachelor of Business (Marketing) / Bachelor of Creative Industries (Fashion Communication)
Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada

 

In terms of content studied I found SFU’s business units to be on a similar level to QUT’s. However, there were some differences in assessments, grading and how things were taught. For SFU’s business units they are graded on a grading curve, where you marks are determined by how everyone in your class performs too (which can work for or against you). This meant it was quite hard to determine how you were going throughout the semester but worked out for me in the end.

The other thing that was different to QUT for me was class participation marks and the lack of recorded lectures. This meant that class attendance was a must and did mean that I wasn’t able to travel and do as many activities during university as originally planned. Other than this there wasn’t too much of a difference and I really enjoyed studying at SFU.

Well, you just have to get in a snowball fight while in Canada…

Like mentioned earlier my travel was limited due to study but with so many things to do in Vancouver and with Whistler only being 2hrs away I was still able to do a lot of the things I wanted to do. I would however highly recommend having some extra time either before or after study to travel as friends of mine who did not have extra time to travel after study did wish they allowed time to do so. Another tip of mine is take out the extra QUT exchange loan if you feel like you might not have enough money for the trip as it is the worst when you are worried about funds and then are stopping yourself from doing the things you want to be doing.

Overall, I had an amazing exchange, did so many things I’ve never done before like snowboarding as well making some long lasting friendships with people from all over the world as well as Canada.

Snowboarding while on Exchange

Settling in to Simon Fraser, Canada

Mikaela H
Bachelor of Business (Marketing) / Bachelor of Creative Industries (Fashion Communication)
Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada

 

For semester one of 2017 I partook in an exchange at Simon Fraser University (SFU) in Vancouver, Canada. Doing university at SFU was different from the get go with the semester starting on the 4th of January. For Canada, this was the middle of winter and for Vancouver this usually means a fair bit of rain and snow so make sure you pack your thermals because it gets pretty cold!

It’s cold from the beginning – pack your thermals!

In terms of accommodation I applied for on-campus student accommodation at SFU’s Burnaby campus. The building I stayed in for this consisted of dormitory style buildings in which you had your own room in a hallway of rooms beside each other with a shared bathroom, kitchen and lounge room. If given the chance with exchange anywhere I would highly recommend trying to stay on-campus because I found it a lot easier to make friends as a lot of the people there are in the same boat as you.

The friends I met while staying on campus

 

Overall, I had an amazing exchange, did so many things I’ve never done before like snowboarding as well making some long lasting friendships with people from all over the world as well as Canada.

Oh Candaaaa!

Rosanna, E. Bachelor of Business and Creative Industries

Ryerson University (Semester 1, 2017)

I experienced my exchange in Toronto, Canada and endured the frigid winter that it put on display. This was the first challenge I faced; the lead up to my exchange was so swift and overwhelmingly busy at times, that I had forgotten to prepare myself for -20 degree days, not including wind chill. I quickly discovered that I am a Queenslander at heart, I became a sun-worshiper and tested my room-mate’s patience with me as I constantly pointed out how cold it was and refused to go outside if it wasn’t a necessity.

Me playing in snow for the first time

I resided in a co-op building which was recommended to all the exchange students who were attending Ryerson University. This was great as it meant practically everyone who was involved in the program also lived, ate and drank together daily. My room-mates quickly became my closest friends which I cherished when battling my homesickness. This was another thing that shocked me and something I really didn’t think I would experience! I hopelessly missed the clear blue skies of Brisbane and the constant stream of vitamin D from the sun; it’s safe to say that I truly experienced Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)! EVERYTHING changed for me though on my mid-semester break, where my French room-mate and I took a spontaneous trip to Mexico. The trip healed my longing for sun while simultaneously changing my perspective on my not-yet enjoyed experience. People who go on exchange do-so for a reason; whether that may be to experience new things, for personal growth, to travel while studying or to drink your way through classes and scrape by with a satisfactory grade. For me, acknowledging that I was homesick and deciding to accept that and embrace the opportunity that I had worked so hard to give myself was the best decision I made.

The Toronto sky line from Toronto Island

I began to embrace the snow and the ice glazed streets and the fact that I could never feel my hands or feet. More importantly though, I embraced the people I was meeting and opened to the idea that my friends back home didn’t have to be my only friends. My greatest joy that the exchange program brought me were the friendships I found. People on exchange generally have this mentality and openness to life that I loved. Everyone is there with the assumption socialising is a priority, thus people had a zest for life and new experiences. It was refreshing and an opportunity to break away from the predispositions I felt held me back in Brisbane and an opportunity for me to become more confident in myself. Exchange gave me the time away from home that gave me the opportunity to be truly isolated from the friends and family that have surrounded me my whole life. I could experience who I was and what I wanted without those external influences and it felt quite liberating!

The Washington sister Women’s March in Toronto

I now have a new fondness and appreciation for home and the people there while also having a lust and excitement for travelling to unfamiliar places. The exchange program created a catalyst for me to be confident in myself and my passions and has enabled me to have a zestiness for life to carry out and achieve big blinding goals that I would never have thought I could achieve before leaving home! I’m very grateful that I took advantage of the opportunity and have signed up for a study tour in Peru at the end of this year to further my personal growth!

Ottawa Ontario

Joel, R. Bachelor of Mathematics

University of Ottawa (Semester 2, 2016)

My first night at the University of Ottawa in Canada’s capital city was 30 degrees Celsius and muggy.  Not at all the weather I expected, but perhaps that was simply thanks to my lack of research into my host city.  My housemates were chatting in the lounge as I walked into my new home, a Chilean, Russian and a Belgian rounding out our multicultural apartment, and they made the next 4 months far more welcoming than that first hot night.

Before arriving in Canada I took the opportunity to visit Europe, managing to visit Paris, Brussels, Amsterdam, Vienna and Munich before finally heading to North America.  I then spent another couple of weeks in Kelowna BC, Canada, a beautiful town which offers a huge amount of outdoor activities and natural beauty.

As the first weeks in Ottawa went by I took the opportunity to explore and meet my neighbours, generally fellow exchange students from places like Ireland, Sweden, England, China, the Netherlands and everywhere in between.  Ottawa is a curious mix between city and town, not as big or busy as Toronto or Montreal, but with just as much history.  Originally a frontier logging town, Ottawa prospered into the home of Canada’s government.  Separated from Quebec and one of its cities, Gatineau, by a large river, Ottawa is a city of beauty and variety as I came to discover during my time there.

Eventually the university semester started and I began my first classes in a new country, an experience that ended up feeling very similar to those I had at home.  Professors used technology to present lectures, answered class questions and gave assignments, just like they do at QUT.  The only major difference was the rack of winter coats hanging at the back of the classroom by the time cold weather came through in about November.  Snow followed soon after, transforming an already beautiful city into a winter wonderland (as corny as that sounds).

My apartment, while not luxurious by any means, was cosy and sufficient enough to keep me alive through the cold weather.  I was relieved to find the cost of living similar enough to Brisbane, with goods roughly the same or cheaper in Ottawa.  My housemates and our neighbours grew accustomed to the idea of spending 15 minutes or more just layering up enough to brave the -25 degree weather to go get some shawarma or poutine from the local store.

Through all the pitfalls of a new country, like dealing with tipping, winter clothes and the rules of hockey, I was lucky to have a tight group of friends to go through the same experiences.  We shared trips to Toronto, Montreal, Niagara Falls, even managing a week in Cuba, and meeting people like them has been the most important takeaway from my time overseas.  My advice to future exchange students is to focus on that network of friends, push yourself to talk to anyone and everyone.  Any city in the world has things to do, but it’s the people in that city that sets it apart and makes exchange a truly worthwhile experience.

Canada Eh!

Jessica R, Bachelor of Business/Creative Industries

Queens University (Semester 2, 2016)

My semester on exchange in Kingston, Canada has finished and what an experience it has been!

While my time at Queen’s was nothing short of amazing, it’s also important to remember that there are a lot of differences to QUT. Aside from the obvious difference in the accent (as to be expected, eh), the classroom sizes, teaching methods and workload are quite different to what we’ve experienced at QUT. With smaller classrooms and lessons reflecting what we call tutorials, participation is expected and more often than not your contribution in class is graded. I also found there was more work to complete on a weekly basis, with small assessments due regularly or a weekly quiz. Another major difference is the amount of group work – expect to be working in 4 or 5 groups at a time!

Aside from the differences academically, university life is similar to that in Australia. Small differences such as more of a community feel and the opportunity to live in residence make your exchange experience just that little bit more exciting and different.

While Canada is similar to Australia in a lot of ways, driving on the opposite side of the road was probably the biggest adjustment I had to make – even just crossing the road! The cost of living is similar to that of Australia, just remember taxes are added and tipping is expected in restaurants and for any services. While it’s not overly difficult to travel within Canada, it is expensive. For example, the 2 ½ hour train trip from Kingston to Toronto cost me around $50 each way, although there are options for buses as well. My tip here is to try and book transport in advance if you can, and keep an eye out for specials!

When reflecting back over my time on exchange I had so many good experiences that it’s hard to choose highlights! Perhaps my biggest take away from my time on exchange is the people I’ve met. Queen’s has a great orientation program and a few associations tailored to exchange students, which makes meeting people from all over the world so easy! I also found that because exchange at Queen’s is such a popular thing to do – 80% of third year commerce students go on exchange – the majority of students in my classes were also exchange students. This was comforting in the fact that we were all in the same boat in regards to being new to the system and how things work in Canada. It also meant I got to work in groups with students from all over the world. Perhaps the biggest highlight from my exchange experience was my accommodation. While trying to organise somewhere to live through the internet from the other side of the world was stressful, it couldn’t have worked out any better. I subletted a room in a house with 5 other girls, of which 4 were Canadian students and the other a fellow exchange student from England. I would highly recommend to anyone going on exchange to try and live with some local students if you can! Not only did these 5 girls become my best friends, they also made me feel incredibly welcome into their home and friendship groups – putting right amongst the local student culture!

All in all, my exchange experience in Canada was one of the best things I’ve done in my life so far and I wouldn’t change anything about it. The whole experience, including all the ups and downs, has made me a better person and has contributed to my education more than anything ever could!

 

Thinking About Going on Exchange? Do it.

My final exams are over, Bishop’s is closing for the holidays and by now the majority of my wardrobe is purple, so I guess that means my time here as a student is up!

Applying to go on exchange and choosing Bishop’s has been the best decision I’ve ever made. So I want to take a moment to say to anyone who might be considering going on an exchange (or even if you’re not), do it! There are so many amazing places out there, choose somewhere you’ve always wanted to go or somewhere that looks cool to you and just go for it. Get that second job and start saving, work hard for a scholarship that can get you there, plan a budget that works for you, boost your grades and take the time to put together a great application – whatever it is you can do to make it happen, if you can do it, I guarantee it’ll be worth it.

My advice once you get there? Immerse yourself in the university life, embrace the foreign culture, stay in contact with family and friends back home, study (not too much! but enough to pass), make new friends, party, travel and just have fun with it – it really is a once in a lifetime opportunity.

What I love about the student exchange program is that it’s more than just travelling and more than just studying. I got the chance to live in another country for the first time, have the ‘college experience’, be the ‘foreign exchange student’, and meet people and learn things I wouldn’t have had the chance to otherwise. If you’re experience is anything like mine, you’ll have the time your life.

I also just want to take a second to mention, it’s ‘pass or fail’. Okay, I’ll leave it at that.

So after all this, if you’re wondering why I’m not an absolute mess right now about having to leave, because I’m so in love with this place and the people in it, I’ll be returning for a visit to Bishop’s in January to say my goodbyes before I fly back home to Australia. Until then – I might not be an exchange student anymore but that doesn’t mean the adventure is over yet! I came all this way, so now it’s time to travel!

10 Things to Love About Bishop’s University

Let’s be honest, there’s more than just 10 great things about Bishop’s. I could rave about this place all day. But instead I’m keeping it brief and bringing you 10 things I’ve enjoyed about going to school here!

  1. Small School Size

You see familiar faces everywhere you go and are always bumping into friends.

  1. Residence

You can choose to live off campus in one of the many nearby houses and apartments or on campus in one of the residence buildings. There are lots of great options to make you feel right at home.

  1. Dining Hall

It’s been declared the 2nd best in the country and it’s easy to see why. With an ever-changing menu, made-to-order omelette, crêpe, stir-fry, pasta and grill stations, long opening hours and plenty of space to eat with friends or catch up on some television on the projector screen.

  1. Sport

There’s something on every weekend from football, basketball, lacrosse, hockey, soccer or rugby. The atmosphere at these games is incredible. There are varsity and club teams meaning everyone gets a chance to play.

  1. Classes

They’re engaging and taught by professors who know you by name and are always up for a chat.

  1. Clubs

From the Environmental Club, Investment Club, Social Justice Collective or Bowling Club, there’s something for everyone.

  1. The Gait

The campus bar hosts Happy Hour every Thursday and Gait Night every Saturday with free entry, drink specials, DJs and live bands, and themed events.

  1. The Plex

There’s a lot to do in one place. This building has a gym, study area, pool, ice skating rink, basketball courts, combat room, dance studio, health clinic and café, all available for student use.

  1. Diversity

The university is made up of 2300 students of all sorts of different nationalities, races, sexualities and genders.

  1. Location

Small town life is great. You can walk to everything you need, no cars needed. There’s a supermarket, service station, pharmacies, banks, restaurants, various shops (liquor store, bookstore, dollarstore) and the local pub. And for when you’re feeling that city life, Montréal is a bus ride away.

Fall Celebrations at Bishop’s University

fall coloursI’ve been loving Fall here in Canada. The colours are amazing, let me tell you. But another thing I’ve been enjoying are the Fall celebrations! Here’s the lowdown on the three main events I’ve had fun with this season…..

  1. Homecoming! The most purple-filled weekend of the year.

coulter fieldThis weekend involved sports games attended by the whole school, a tailgate, keggers, alumni visiting and an insane amount of school spirit.

  1. Thanksgiving! My first ever. (People kept asking me what the Australian version of Thanksgiving is but there really isn’t one!)

thanksgiving dinnerI got a very kind invite to spend the weekend with my friend Anna and her family at their home in Toronto. So after a carpool to Montréal, bus to Ottawa and another bus to Toronto, 12 hours later we arrived at Anna’s house. Most of the weekend was spent meeting Anna’s friends and family, exploring downtown Toronto, shopping, drinking pumpkin spice lattes, watching baseball and football games, walking along Lake Ontario and sightseeing over the Toronto skyline. Oh and there was Thanksgiving Dinner of course (so much good Canadian food!)

  1. Halloweekend! The three-day event celebrating Halloween.

halloweekend night 2From my first week at Bishop’s, I’d heard people talking about this weekend which involved students wearing a different costume each night. Luckily it lived up to the hype. There were a lot of things going on over the weekend but the main events looked like this:

  • Thursday: Happy Hour at the campus bar
  • Friday: Party at Animal House, a backyard party where students typically dressed in animal onesies
  • Saturday: Gait Night where the campus bar was turned into a club for the lucky 900 across the whole school who scored tickets (thankfully I was one of them)

mont orfordAll in all, this Fall has not disappointed! Now it’s time to enjoy the rest of these colours before Winter rolls in!

 

 

Frosh Week at Bishop’s University

My semester at Bishop’s University is now well under way and I couldn’t be happier about it!

field dayIt all began with Move-In Day where I was greeted by friendly students, happy to help carry my bags to the top floor of the residence building where I’m living. Here I have a room to myself which comes with a single bed, dresser, desk, chair, bedside table, closet, and sink, as well as a bathroom that I share with my roommate next door.

first football gameAfter moving in, the university organised some events and activities to get to know the other students. Here I met group of friends who I spent the rest of the day with which meant going to the first football game of the season (or in my case, my first Canadian football game ever), then hanging out in one of the apartment style residences, before heading out to a party in a house occupied by a group of upper year students.

The following day marked the beginning of O-Week also known here as Frosh Week. This meant choosing our teams for the week. At Bishop’s this was not just a spontaneous decision. We’d been introduced to the different teams and leaders over social media in the weeks leading up. We were then encouraged to speak to every team before making a decision to join the one that best suited what we wanted to get out of Frosh Week. Every team had a name which combined the theme of the week (School of Rock) with the university. The team I chose was ‘Rich Homie Gaiters’ (the students and sports teams here are called ‘Gaiters’), and I’m so glad I did! I had an absolute ball with this team, made some great friends and met some incredible people.

field day team photoOnce the teams were picked, Bishop’s didn’t slow down the whole week. The week consisted of opening and closing ceremonies, parties every night, crazy challenges to win points for your teams, concerts, a scavenger hunt across town, a glow-in-the-dark run, a dance battle, singing the school song to the principle outside his house one night, seminars, panels, tours, movie night, play auditions, games and much more!

massawippi shoreAs if there wasn’t enough excitement already, I got to celebrate my birthday during Frosh Week! Before coming to Bishop’s I expected that with having just moved to a new country, I wouldn’t scavenger huntknow anyone well enough to properly celebrate it this year. However, I was so wrong. My lovely new group of friends decided to surprise me with a personalised cake they had made that day, and I was sung ‘Happy Birthday’ to by the entire Frosh Week student body, before we partied on that night.

Frosh Week has been one of the most fun-filled weeks of my life and even though it’s now over, my life at Bishop’s is just beginning.remember how you entered

The end of classes

This week marked the end of classes for my exchange to Canada. I honestly cannot believe how fast time has gone and in less than three weeks, when exams have been written and their ending celebrated, we will be packing our bags and leaving Fenwick Tower for the last time. The past few weeks have been a blur. So much has happened since reading week.

10 days after the Bahamas, myself, 2 girls and 1 boy from Fenwick headed to Cancun, Mexico for a 4 day long weekend during American Spring Break. Our timing coincided with the beginning of the celebrations, so things weren’t as wild as they get, but it was still an awesome experience and I would definitely be keen to return to experience more of Mexico at some point. Our flight to Mexico involved a 10 hour stopover in New York, so we made the most of the oppportunity and caught the subway into Manhattan to do a spot of shopping and a little sight seeing.

We returned to the airport to find out flight delayed due to the weather. After a few more hassles we finally got to Cancun after 1am, about 4 hours later than expected. We had been upgraded to a nicer hotel before we left but upon arrival there we found there had again been a booking issue and we were instead upgraded once more. Finally getting to our hotel after 2am was not the start we had dreamed of but vowed to enjoy our luxurious accommodation for the weekend! We woke up the next morning to be blown away by the quality of the hotel and the indescribable view! WOW. the rest of the weekend more than made up for the hassles at the beginning and we were once again sad to leave the warm weather, but happy to return to our home, Halifax (and to show off our tans to the pasty Canadians!)

Nightclub

After Cancun came St Patty’s Day. Nova Scotia has proud Scottish connections and origins, and the people of Halifax were more than willing to extend such ties to include Ireland for the day! Things could not have been greener! We arrived at the Grawood (which is the on-campus bar at Dal) at the modest time of 11:30am (very well behaved in comparison to those who went to the old maritime pub on the waterfront at 6am!!) all decked out in green finery. The bar staff were dying people’s beer green, there were shamrocks everywhere and the festive spirit was high- if I hadn’t known better you could have quite easily convinced me I was in Ireland!

The next day, despite the damage inflicted on my liver the day before, I trotted off to my family law class at 9am. Talk about dedication!
After St Patty’s things quitened down a little, as we all tried to catch up with uni work, while still fitting in a weekly excursion to the nightlife!

We have also climbed onto the roof of Fenwick Tower (33 story building) a few times, and have gotten some amazing photos.. there is a ladder to the top from our balcony, but no railing on the roof and we probably aren’t meant to get up there but its safe enough if you aren’t silly…

There is a bar down by the waterfront in the historical buildings called “The Lower Deck” and on Sundays it goes off with a beloved local covers band called ‘Signal Hill’. I strongly suggest you google them and listen to their music- they are AMAZING and definitely one of the things I will miss most when I leave here (although I have already bought one of their CD’s to take home with me!)

Well I had better get back to the books as my first exam is in 3 days.. uh ohhh- have been prcrastinating too much booking flights and accommodation for travelling post exams (around Nova Scotia, to Toronto, Montreal, Quebec City, New York and Vancouver)