Life in Kassel

Tantika Na Nakhon, Master of Engineering Management

Short-term program: Hessen University “Hessen International Summer University – Kassel”

Germany (June/July 2018)

Hessen International Summer School

My name is Tantika Na Nakhon and I’ve just completed an international summer program at the Universität Kassel (University of Kassel) in Kassel, Germany. It was four-week program and I was studying in the engineering module. I chose environmental engineering and renewable energies and risk management in environmental engineering. The seminars were intensive and lots of excursion. As part of risk management, my class visited Volkswagen, B. Braun Melsungen and Wintershall and we found the risks from the real situations. I would highly recommend enrolling in both courses. Moreover, German class was useful for daily life. There are many activities that you can join such as hiking, movie night, games night and German folk dance.

University Campus

University Campus

University Campus

Life in Germany and Highlights of short term program

Living in Germany was easy. In this program everyone had to stay with host family and it was good to learn their culture and lifestyles. German people were cold at first meeting, but when you get closer to them are friendly and kind. Kassel is located in central Germany. Thus, it would be beneficial to travel to other countries. My favourite trip outside of Germany was to Netherlands with my host family, and within Germany we took a 4 hour drive throughout the country which was also fantastic. The University organised a free trip to Fritzler. It took 35 minutes from Kassel. Fritzler is a small town in the Schwalm-Eder district in northern Hesse. The town has a medieval centre surrounded by a wall with numerous watch towers.

Fritzlar

Netherlands trip with my host family

Overall, I had an awesome experience and I wish I had the chance to do it again. It was good opportunity to explore other countries and I’d encourage every student to consider this program.

University of Kassel: Short Term Exchange – Long Term Memories

Karl Somoray, Bachelor of Engineering/Mathmatics

Short-term program: Hessen University “Hessen International Summer University – Kassel”

Germany (June/July 2018)

During the Summer of 2018, myself and along with around 15 other QUT students were very fortunate enough to receive a mobility scholarship from the Hessen International Summer Universities. From this, we were able to complete a short course over at the renowned University of Kassel, at Kassel, Germany where I studied Adaptations to Climate Change, Environmental Engineering and Renewable Energies and German (Basic).

The University

Being only experienced to seeing the QUT campuses (and some of the UQ facilities), one of the biggest things that shocked me was the vast difference of facilities that the University of Kassel had compared to QUT. I found that both the buildings and the facilities of the University of Kassel seemed more `aged’ than the QUT campus, but nevertheless was a host to numerous experienced academics in renewable energies and had connections to multiple institutions leading the renewables field.

A trip to the wind farms!

While I’m happy to be back on QUT campus, the one thing I miss is the MENSA! Conversely to the food court we have at either KG or GP (where we have multiple stores in one spot), the cafeteria at Kassel instead has multiple outlets for different types of meals, desserts etc. all cooked by staff at the university. Every day the meals are different, and the best thing about is that it’s very cheap and tasty!

All this for ~$6AUD!

The Country

For my stay, I lived at a quaint little street at the outskirts of Kassel with 3 other ISU students, including my friend from QUT! Fortunately as well, the scholarship paid for our months stay, including meals that our host parent was extremely good at making!

Don’t be alarmed, but this raw pork is awesome.

The relatively small town of Kassel in which the majority of the time we were in, was a refreshing place to live in, outside of the usual bustling city in Brisbane. With my host family as well as the ISU, we explored several spots around Kassel that I wouldn’t have thought to explore.

Fritzlar

Edersea

The Experience

By far the most memorable moments in my trip however were the short excursions to different countries/cities during our free time (enabled by getting a Eurail travel pass beforehand, which was definitely worth the price we paid for it) and hanging out with the ISU students.

ISU Graduation Ceremony

Manarola, Italy

Lauterbrunnen, Switzerland

So my tip for future students is to make the most out of every day of your trip! Meet new people and explore as much as you can. It’s a short exchange that happens once in a lifetime, so don’t skimp out on time and have fun, because before you know it, you’ll be boarding your plane back home, and you’ll never know what experiences you’ll miss out on!

Once in a Lifetime Excursions at Hessen University

Jessica Ly, Bachelor of Engineering

Short-term program: Hessen University ‘Hessen International Summer University – Kassel’

Germany (June/July 2018)

My host university was the University of Kassel. It’s located in central Germany between the cities of Frankfurt and Hanover. For the International Summer University (ISU), most of the classes were held in the same building across the road from the main campus. The main facility I used on campus was the Mensa (cafeteria). The food was quite cheap, around 2 to 3 Euros for a meal, and a quick option in between classes.

I was lucky enough to live between the main train station (Wilheimshohe Bahnhof) and the main university campus. This made travel very convenient to and from uni as I had several tram options within the city and also being 5 minutes’ walk away from the regional train station meant that I could easily depart and arrive back at my accommodation on weekend trips. I ended up with a whole flat to myself which was very nice. The building was like ten townhouses joined together and my host mother owned one of the ‘townhouses’. She lived on the ground floor of the building, rented out the second floor and the third floor was where I stayed. In the flat I had a bathroom with a bath tub, toilet and sink; kitchen area with stovetop, oven, fridge, dishwasher and sink; living area furnished; and bedroom with a study area. I really enjoyed living there because it was a cosy space and I could easily go downstairs to see my host mother.

My accommodation.

My schedule for classes was set out really well. We all had German class every morning and either one or two classes after. So most days I had the afternoon off to explore the city or do some activities organised by the ISU team. The World Cup was on during our time there, so I spent a lot of time watching the matches with the other students. The tutorial classes we had for our modules were very helpful for the final exam so it certainly reduced exam stress.

Germany has a very strong focus on research so most of our lectures were based around research conducted by the lecturer with theory combined throughout the lesson. This was not my first time in the country so I did not have much culture shock however one afternoon my friends and I decided to walk through one of the big parks which had the Fulda River running through it. We didn’t know it at the time but several of the areas in the park were zoned for nude swimming. Even though it was a relatively cold day, there were still people who were comfortable in the bare.

Testing out a water filtration system.

I think some of the biggest advantages of this program are the excursions and field activities. As part of the renewable energy course I took, we got to go to a wind farm and inside a windmill. This was definitely a one in a lifetime experience as normally you would not be able to gain that type of access. We also visited Viessmann headquarters which was very cool. The global company specialises in heating systems and manufactures boilers from that factory. Another class we had was taught by a professor who invented a portable water filtration system, initially targeted for emergency situations, but also provides safe drinking water straight from an unclean water source. About 1000 units have been sold to places all around the world.

A once in a lifetime opportunity to go to a windfarm and inside a windmill.

My life in Kassel and Germany

Jeng-Han Lu, Master of Information Technology

Short-term program: Hessen University “Hessen International Summer University – Kassel”

Germany (June/July 2018)

In the semester break between SEM-1 and SEM-2 in 2018, I was fully immersed in German culture, thanks for the International Summer University (Kassel). Although the time was short, it may have been the best travel experience of my life.

The course I selected was the two seminars under the cultural module: Intercultural Communication and German Fairy Tale. Composed with various activities, we started from the definition of culture to how different cultures interact with each other. One of my favorite activities was a role playing game about collaboration between two cultures. The whole class was divided into a group of villagers and engineers, each group had follow their own custom. The goal of the game is to learn how to communicate with people with of different cultures or customs, and complete the task. Although it was challenging at the beginning, finally we worked out some ways to build a “bridge”. I believe this seminar will greatly help people who wish to work in a multicultural environment.

As an iconic city because of the stay of the Brothers Grimm, studying their fairy tales at Kassel became so immersive. The seminar contained both indoor classes and excursions. The indoor classes provided a brief introduction of the Grimm’s fairy tales, including lives of the Brothers Grimm, their motives of writing the fairy tales and other background knowledge. There are two excursions in this seminar: Brauhaus Knallhütte and Grimmwelt Kassel. Brauhaus Knallhütte was once the inn where the Grimms collected many folk tales from the innkeeper’s daughter, Dorothea Viehmann. We had a fantastic lecture in this historical place and enjoyed traditional German courses and beer. Another excursion to Grimmwelt was also amazing. As a museum of Grimm’s Fairy Tales, Grimmwelt indicates the achievements of the brothers, including the fairy tales and German Dictionary. The interactive equipment also takes visitors into the world of the fairy tales.

Museum of Grimm’s Fairy Tales

Brauhaus Knallhütte was once the inn where the Grimms collected many folk tales from the innkeeper’s daughter.

One of the most impressive culture shocks was that German people are very willing to help visitors. On the second last day in Germany, I took a train from Kassel to Frankfurt and stayed overnight for the next day’s flight. When the train approached Giessen, it slowed down earlier than expected. Then, the train stopped at a small station and the train conductor spoke to the travellers. Suddenly everyone stood up and started leaving the train. Luckily, the man next to me told me that we must leave the train now. After departing the train, the man asked the conductor about what is going on and how to continue to Frankfurt. Then, we took the same bus to the next station, caught the additional train, and finally managed to reach Frankfurt with a 1-hour delay. Honestly, the man had no responsibility to help a foreign traveller, but he wished to spend part of his attention to help a stranger. During my visit to Germany I was helped by many volunteering German people, including a ticket checker on the train (she told us to change wagons because the train would split at the next station) and bikers on the street of Kassel (he told us the correct platform to wait for our tram). So next time, don’t be afraid to ask German people for help!

Don’t be afraid to ask German people for help!

All in all, I strongly encourage QUT students to apply for this program. The summer university provided a comprehensive experience of Germany in all aspects. You will stay will German host families and having traditional German food. Moreover, you stay with host families or explore other places in Germany on weekends or day offs. Last but not the least, you will meet other international students from all around the world!

A Unique Experience in a New City

Dominic Dall’Osto, Bachelor of Engineering

Short-term program: Hessen University ‘Hessen International Summer University – Kassel’

Germany (June/July 2018)

I’ve just returned from a 4 week short-term program in Kassel, Germany – the International Summer University (ISU). I was part of a group of 45 students from all over the world at the ISU. Well, every continent apart from Antarctica. The program consisted of studying German, along with a choice of classes in Environmental Engineering, German Culture, or Nanoscience. We also had a lot of free time to explore the city, as well as travel around Germany.

The best part of the program, though, was the homestay component. I stayed with my host mum, Kristin, and 2 other students from Colombia, in a small farming village in the outskirts of town. It was amazing to wake up every morning, look out over the green fields and see farmers starting their work, but only be a 45 minute train ride away from the city centre. It was also great to live with 2 other students in the program – we shared a lot of new experiences getting to know Kassel, learning German, and cheering for each other’s countries in the World Cup!

The view from my room over our backyard.

My new roommates!

I also spent a lot of time exploring the sights of Kassel. The city’s most famous landmark is the Herkules monument. It is perched 500 metres above the town with a huge complex of water fountains leading down to a castle at the bottom. A castle in Kassel, who’d have thought?! Twice a week the water is turned on and the site fills with tourists following the water down the mountain; through the fountains, down an artificial waterfall, under the Devil’s Bridge, along an aqueduct, and shooting 50 m high into the air at the bottom. All of it is powered only by natural water pressure and has been running for over 300 years!

The beautiful view from the Herkules (ignore the cranes and tourists).

Speaking of powering things with water pressure (smooth segue!) I studied environmental engineering during my time at the University of Kassel. We had guest lectures from experts at the university, and nearby research institutes. But the best bit was going on field trips to see renewable energy technologies in action. We visited a farming village that had built a biogas plant to provide its electricity and heat requirements. We also had the chance to go inside a wind turbine to examine it up close. They’re a lot bigger than they look from a distance! Thanks must also go out to the amazing tutors from the uni who looked after us and kept us entertained throughout the program!

Visiting a wind farm. Fellow students for scale.

A Biogas tank in the village of Jühnde.

Another highlight was the group trip to Berlin during the program. Especially interesting were the stories told by the program director, Jürgen, who had experienced the separation between East and West Germany first hand. Hearing his accounts of waiting for 5 hours at the border while his car was searched were chilling. We also caught Germany’s capital in the grips of World Cup fever, with a huge public viewing at the Brandenburg Gate. Unfortunately, spirits dropped after Germany got knocked out.

Overall, the Kassel ISU program was a great and unique experience: living with a German family, but also spending so much time with the other students that they became like family; exploring a new city; learning a new language; being taught by experts in the field of environmental engineering; and generally enjoying the summer in Germany. I would definitely recommend Kassel’s International Summer University program!

A Memorable German Experience in Kassel

Arun Pathmanathan, Bachelor of Engineering

Short-term program: Hessen University ‘Hessen International Summer University – Kassel’

Germany (June/July 2018)

I wanted to do a short-term exchange program which I thought would help me to develop my knowledge on the subject that I wanted to pursue, to learn new culture and languages and to meet different people from different parts of the world. Therefore, I thought of applying for the Hessen International Summer University program. Since I am an engineering student, I selected the engineering modules that were offered by Hessen International Summer University program which was held in the University of Kassel.

Kassel is a city located in the northern Hesse, Germany. Kassel had many historical palaces and parks including the Bergpark Wilhelmshöhe which was considered the second largest park on a hill slope in the world. Staying in such a place for four weeks was a new experience, studying there with students from different countries gave me a chance to get to know their cultures and traditions and their languages.

Throughout our stay in Kassel, the University of Kassel took us on excursions to different places in Kassel and made us participate in German Folk Dance, hiking and many other activities apart from studying. I think having to just study the whole four weeks would have made our experience miserable, but the ISU had different kinds of activities for us which made our experience in Kassel memorable.

Kassel is a city located in the northern Hesse, Germany.

The location of the University of Kassel was very convenient for us as it was located in the city. The cafeteria of the University was an advantage for us as the food that they had was really good and therefore, most of the students often ate their lunch there.

My accommodation was in a homestay with a German family, and the place was about 5km away from the university. The place was quiet and clean and the facilities were good. Since the public transportation were good in Kassel, there wasn’t any problem of travelling to the University or any other place that I wanted to go.

In terms of studies and other activities, I had a very good time in Kassel. There is no point of anyone going just to concentrate on studies, without participating in other activities organised by the University. By attending those other activities you can learn their culture, meet new people, and of course have fun.

Getting Creative in Glasgow

Anna Banszel, Bachelor of Design (Architecture) 

Short-term Program: University of Glasgow ‘Scottish Urban Landscapes in Film and Glass’

Scotland (July 2018)

While Brisbane shivered this winter I was over in sunny Britain studying Scottish Urban
Landscape in Film and Glass at the Glasgow School of Art (GSA). This intense
one-week course combined research with technical experience in the renowned
photography and glass workshops at the GSA.

Through my research I discovered that Glasgow has been settled since prehistoric
times and rapidly expanded during the 16th century when traders and craftspeople
converged in the city. Glasgow still maintains that legacy of quality of craftsmanship,
with the GSA being an exemplar of world-class art education.

On day one and two I learnt 35mm photography. With a camera provided by the
university I roamed the gritty streets of Glasgow capturing moments of urbanity in
one of the most beautiful and diverse cities I have ever experienced. Developing my
film in the dark rooms was both technically and creatively challenging. There is a lot of
scope for creative expression after the film is shot. In making my prints from my
negatives I experimented with exposure and filter to get the results I was after.

Photography lab.

For days three to five we moved into the glass studios to learn glass art. The
photographs I developed on my first two days informed the design of my bespoke
stained glass panel. In this studio I learnt how to design my panel, cut the glass,
solder the lead, apply the putty between the lead and glass and paint the glass.

Glass art studio.

On the last day all the international students were invited to a gathering were we
met other students and saw the work people had produced. All the staff at GSA
were really friendly and approachable. Though it’s part of huge university the vibe
at the GSA is more like a boutique studio run by artists who value collaboration and
push the creative boundaries.

Glass and photos.

Before I took this course, I’ll admit Glasgow was never on my list of places to see. I
had been to Edinburgh and the Scottish highlands and considered Scotland ticked
off my travel list. Big mistake – Glasgow is brilliant! If you’re after culture it’s home
to fine institutions like the Scottish Ballet, if you want a social atmosphere head to
the West End and explore the bars. If you want history there are loads of museums
and if fancy gardens the Glasgow Botanic Gardens can take a whole day to
explore. It doesn’t get dark till after 10pm either, so you can take your time. One of
my favourite nights out was seeing Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing in the
Botanic Gardens for five pounds.

Glasgow skyline.

Glasgow university.

I stayed at the GSA accommodation where I had my own ensuite room. It was
modern and clean with a shared kitchen with all the facilities needed to cook meals.
With so many places to eat out I only really used the kitchen for breakfasts but if I’d
been there for longer I would have been cooking up a storm. Washing machines
were also available for laundry, it was five minutes walk from the studios and
staffed until 7pm every day. Price of living is similar to Australia. For lunch I usually
went to a convenience store and got a sandwich or salad for about $5 AUD. Once I
was in Glasgow I walked everywhere, or took a black cab if it was late at night.
Getting to Glasgow from London or Edinburgh is easiest by rail and prices are
lower if you book online in advance.

My experience at GSA differed from my experience at QUT in that GSA was all
studio based. Other than that it was similar – we learnt the techniques, studied the
context and worked from a design brief under the guidance of our tutors.

If I could offer advice to anyone considering taking this course is to go with an open
mind and willingness to push yourself creatively. I’d also recommend you give
yourself a few days either side of your course to explore the city and meet some
locals. I extended my trip to three weeks to visit London and Copenhagen. It was
great to have that down time to balance the trip with work and play.
My only complaint about this course was that it wasn’t long enough!

Me in London.

Opening My Eyes to the Beauty of Germany

Sophie Heather, Bachelor of Fine Arts

Short-term program: Hessen University ‘Hessen International Summer University – Fulda’

Germany (July/August 2018)

My time in the 2018 ISU Fulda was life changing. It’s hard to find the words that will give justice to the program. I applied not expecting to be accepted, but I was, and I had 8 weeks to get organised! (I didn’t have a passport…eeek!)

Going into the program I hadn’t heard much about Germany aside from it’s infamous history. Friends would ask me if I could speak any German, to which I replied “no, but we learn it as part of the program”. I expected to leave the trip being relatively fluent in German. Haha. The language is very hard as the grammar is very different to English.

I am welcomed into Fulda by the German tutors – students who attend the host university. The tutors ran every activity and were the people we consulted if we had any issues. They were so funny, welcoming and understanding – I hope to see them in the future. They are fluent in English and are just absolutely lovely. I am given directions to my accommodation which require me to take a bus. I learn that public transport is free for university students! This ended up saving me a lot of money.

Brandenburg Gate

There were four types of accommodation; I was lucky to be in the hostel where I had my own room and shared kitchen and bathroom. Instantly, I made friends with the other girls from the program; on the first night they were so welcoming and invited me to go explore Fulda with them! The second I started talking to these girls I noticed how unusual the Australian accent is – it was a really strange moment. I was the only Australian in my hostel, and one out of four in the program! Australians made 1 out of the 15 different nationalities that attended ISU Fulda in 2018.

I made friends from all over the world.

For the seminar, I chose Music Therapy. My class was very small, I was 1 of 8 students! Additional to Australian students there were Portuguese, Russian and Israeli students. The seminar was very fun as we got to play a variety of instruments including rare instruments one wouldn’t typically know. Our teacher, Wolfgang, was highly energetic and took an interest in our cultures; as half our class were from Israel, we learnt a lot about their culture and the Jewish religion which I found fascinating.

Playing rare instruments in the music therapy program.

I was in the Beginner German class and was taught by the lovely Jana – a Russian woman who loved to learn languages! She taught us through singing songs whilst she played the guitar, it was very helpful! There were also days where she took us out blueberry picking, and on the last day to get some cake; she has the kindest heart.

The Mensa is the campus cafeteria – the food is so cheap! Each day there are 8 new meal options and they always tasted so good! You could get a big bowl of pasta for 1.50 Euros! There were lots of salads and snacks as well as vegetarian and vegan options! QUT seriously needs one of these!

ISU really opened my eyes to the beauty of Germany. I had learnt in school the brief history of the country during the World Wars and the Cold War. However, to actually go to the places that were talked about (Point Alpha, The Berlin Wall, concentration camps) it was only then that the history lessons made sense. It was eye opening to learn about the suffrage of people due to power falling in the wrong hands. It was haunting to walk upon grounds where millions were murdered. It was incredible to see modern Germany where the civilians accept the past and continue to create a nation that focuses on love and peace.

Upon returning to Australia, everyone would ask me “what was the best bit?” I can’t think of one particular time, however, my favourite aspect of the trip was that I made so many friends. I was able to walk up to anyone and have a great conversation. I made lifelong friends from all over the globe; my most closest friends live in: The USA, France, Netherlands, Portugal and India. I learnt so much about their cultures, and they were so interested to learn about mine. I still keep in contact with these people and I intend to for a very long time.

The best part was I was able to walk up to anyone and have a conversation.

The trip threw me in the deep end and I am so appreciative QUT gave me this opportunity to broaden my horizons. If anyone is wanting to study overseas but does not want to stay long term, this is your program!

My Short but Sweet Time in the United Kingdom

Su Jin Lim, Masters of Business

Short-term program: University of Exeter ‘International Summer School’

England (June/July 2018)

It had always been a lifelong dream of mine to study in the UK; therefore when I saw QUT’s Global Exchange Portal advertising the International Summer School Program at the University of Exeter, I knew I had to do it.

In order to make full use of my winter break, I made the choice to extend my trip and arrive 2 weeks before summer school began. In that time span, I took the opportunity to sight see around London and the beautiful Welsh countryside. I had the opportunity of visiting, Highgate Cemetery (The burial place of Karl Marx), shopping along Oxford Street, and most importantly going to the Harry Potter Studio Tour in Leavesden (It would have been blasphemous for me not to do so!). I spent one week in Wales with my relatives at their smallholdings estate up in Lampeter. Over there we drove around to different places and visited historical sites and museums.

One of the “must-have” shots for anyone who visits the Harry Potter studios.

I then returned to Convent Garden in London where my summer school program began. By this time, London was experiencing one of the worst heat waves, which really was equivalent to a typical Brissie Summer, except it was a lot more humid. We were scheduled to stay in London for the next 4 days for sightseeing. The summer school coordinators planned the trip such that we had plenty of leisure time to explore the city on our own. Luckily for me, I managed to meet friends on the first day of the program, they became my travel buddies throughout the trip. During our stay in London, we were taken to see iconic places such as Tower Bridge, House of Parliament, Trafalgar Square, and the British Museum. The most memorable part of the trip was having the opportunity to watch Shakespeare’s “A Winter’s Tale” at the Globe Theatre just like how people used to watch it back in the day (i.e. standing up for the whole play!). Never have I ever cried and laughed so hard watching a play, the acting and the whole experience of it was honestly quite moving.

Waiting for the play to begin at the Globe Theatre.

Bright and early on our last day in London, we boarded our buses for the 4 ½ hour journey to Exeter. The moment we arrived in Exeter, we were greeted with typical British weather which quite ironically I found to be quite warm and welcoming. I think it was because it was the English weather I was expecting to experience rather than the warm sticky weather. We were all assigned rooms at the on campus accommodation at the University of Exeter. Each of us had our own ensuite toilets, a bed, and a large desk. I technically shared a “flat” with 5 other students and we all had access to a common kitchen. Meals were not catered for, which allowed us full freedom to plan all our meals. Quick tip: I highly recommend you try eating-in when you can; it gives you the opportunity to learn how to cook for yourself but to also to learn the cuisine of other international students cooking in the flat as well. My accommodation was a 10 minute walk to campus and all its facilities which was really convenient for us.    

The Iconic University of Exeter “Rock”.

Class picture on our last day of class with our two module facilitators (Standing on the far left and right).

I enrolled for the “Adapting Cognitive Behavioural Therapy to Improve Accessibility to Psychological Therapies” module at summer school. Classes were 4 hours a day, in 2 hour blocks. Despite the intensity of our classes, I thoroughly enjoyed them as it was highly interactive and very much hands on. I only had 12 other students in my class which gave us the opportunity to really bond with one another and having sessions better tailored to our needs. The assessments for our course were broken down into two parts. Firstly, we had to design a psycho-education leaflet tailored towards international students from a specific country/region. Secondly, we had to give a 30 minute presentation explaining our target sample, design of our leaflet, and how we worked together as a group. 

Visiting the underground tunnels of Exeter.

The town of Bath.

During the two weekends we had at Exeter, we made it a point to do as much sightseeing as we could. We took day trips to the town of Bath (a UNESCO World Heritage site), St. Ives, and we were even adventurous enough to cycle 44km to visit the nearby port town of Exmouth. All of these places were truly amazing and I enjoyed every minute of it.

Overall, I will say that the International School Program at the University of Exeter was amazing such that it allowed you time to learn and having enough time to sightsee, it was really a rewarding experience. Not only did I get the opportunity to visit the beautiful places the UK had to offer, but I was also able to form lifelong friendships with students from all other the globe. To anyone reading this and is interested on going to the UK, I highly recommend applying for this program. You will not regret it, I definitely didn’t J

Everlasting Memories Made at Cambridge

Sabrina Catania, Bachelor of Science

Short-term program: AIM Overseas ‘Cambridge Sciences Summer Program’

England (July 2018)

Life on campus was in itself an amazing experience. All the academics, although kind of intimidating to approach because of how intelligent they were, were so nice and ready to answer any of your questions. This programme brought people from all different organisations to give lectures such as the Gurdon institute and the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) which was a major highlight for me. I was unbelievably lucky to be able to visit the BAS twice while I was at Cambridge and has completely influenced my future plans to work overseas.

British Antarctic Survey (BAS)

Queens College.

Making friends from all over the world.

I stayed on campus at Queens’ College where I was in a single Ensuite room. Breakfast and dinner were also provided for me, which was held in dining halls within Queens’. Breakfast was held buffet style which was amazing! Hash browns, bacon, fresh fruit every morning! There was also a different dinner every night with spectacular desserts to end the night with.  I did have to scout around for my own lunch every day, which I was actually happy about as it gave me the chance to taste test food from all over the city.

The view from my room.

Travelling from Heathrow Airport to Cambridge University was a massive culture shock for me. It definitely made me feel out of depth and overwhelmed. I think this was more to do with this trip being my first time travelling alone and to such a far place from home. Luckily, I made friends at the airports on both my trips from and to Australia. I think having an open mind and being open to the idea of meeting new people adds a lot to your experience overseas. However, once I reached Cambridge, everything kind of fell into place and it was so easy to fall in love with the city. England isn’t too different from Australia, so the cultural aspects weren’t much of a shock for me, however not hearing your normal Aussie accent everywhere was a bit weird.

Here I got to go on a beautiful Punting tour that takes you through the heart of Cambridge University along River Cam.

Here I got to go on a beautiful Punting tour that takes you through the heart of Cambridge University along River Cam.

King’s College Chapel, Cambridge

What was also great about this short-term trip was the amazing people that also were attending the same programme as me. So, although there were people from all over the world, I still got to meet so many people from Australia. It was this group of girls that made me feel at home in this foreign country and we are even now planning a trip to meet up. I also became friends with people from America, Pakistan, Hungary and so many other places. So, I think a main highlight of my trip was the friends I made and the everlasting memories that they helped me create.

The famous Mathematical Bridge which is luckily enough located in Queens’ College.

Charles Darwin statue at Christ College, Cambridge.

I think it should most definitely be noted however, how beautiful Cambridge actually is!