The best experience and memories I will never forget in England

Kate Thamm, Bachelor of Laws (honours)/Bachelor of Business, Nottingham Trent University England, Semester 1, 2019

I have always considered myself a friendly person but I struggle initially with large social settings especially when I do not know anyone. From that, it is clear why I was apprehensive as to whether exchange was something that I would enjoy or if I would end up spending 6 months alone on the other side of the world. But  I can jump ahead and say whole heartedly, exchange was the best thing I have ever done.

Before leaving, one of my friends reassured me and asked me if I have ever heard anyone say that they didn’t enjoy exchange? And she was right. I was lucky enough to get a spot in accommodation on campus, having my own small room and a bathroom (more like a caravan bathroom) but hey, it did the job! I lived in a hallway that had 24 rooms, sharing one large kitchen and one common room which had tables, chairs and two small couches. The entire third floor of our accommodation was purely international students which ended up being one of my favourite aspects of my exchange. It took a lot of self-pep-talks to venture out of my room and a few weeks before I found some people I really connected with, but after that the days just got better and better.

I have an extreme love to travel and I managed to find a group of friends who shared this passion – this led to a few amazing opportunities to travel with my new found friends, first to Ireland then to Greece!

Nottingham itself is a small town and feels like it is largely run by the students at the two universities it has. This created a very lively culture and most evening there was a party happening somewhere and the accompanying music could be heard. Basically the clubbing scene in Nottingham is beyond anything I have ever seen. Any day of the week (but Sunday) there is a club you could go to and it will be packed! My personal favourite day was Wednesdays, where all NTU student groups/unions/clubs or any friendship groups picked a theme for the night and committed to that theme, wearing their unified costumes to the clubs. In the six months I was there I saw it all. VS angels, people dressed as vegetables, as thugs (which we did do one of the nights) you name it! It’s a real right of passage for any NTU students and makes you feel like one of them.

Nottingham also has some beautiful parks, Wollaton park being one of them, where you can see real deer and the mansion of Bruce Wayne from the Batman movies! Not to mention the famous Sherwood forest where Robin Hood roamed. Nottingham is a beautiful city and was the perfect location for a 6 month exchange.

The university itself was also amazing. I was lucky enough to have all of my classes at the city campus which meant everything was in walking distance. The Clifton campus is about a 20 minute bus ride and located quite far from the city. From the stories I heard, even if you have classes at Clifton, I would strongly recommend still getting accommodation at the city campus as I know some of the exchange students at Clifton felt isolated – and missed out on the ease of being able to walk anywhere you want.

Day trip to London with my new friends

The statue of Robin Hood

Got to experience an English football match where Nottingham’s team was playing

Trip to Ireland

Some of us went on a day trip to Wales and hiked through Snowdonia – this was an organised trip by a company called CityLife Nottingham. They run a number of day trips/weekend trips/extended trips, open to any students and for a reasonable price! It is a great way to see more of England and the UK in general without the hassle of having to organise transport youself.

I would recommend exchange to anyone I see and could not be more thankful for my experiences abroad. I have made lifelong friends and memories I will never forget.

Top tips about living in the Netherlands

Charlie G., Masters of Sustainable Energy Technology
Inbound student from the Technical University of Delft,
Semester 2, 2019

My name is Charlie Groenewegen and I’m an exchange student from The Netherlands. My home university is The Technical University of Delft. I’m currently doing my Masters in Sustainable Energy Technology, second year. I had the opportunity to do an exchange program with QUT for one semester. In this blog I’ll explain to you how it is to live in the Netherlands, and Delft, socially and money wise. Also, I’ll give recommendations what to do and where to go in my country.

Delft is a pretty small town in comparison to other big cities such as Amsterdam but that does make it a cozy one. Most student activities, such as sports, are hosted at the university and all the parties can be at external locations or at fraternities. Dutch people are quite direct but very fun to be around with. They’re always in to chill, joke around or just go out and do something. The rent in Delft averages from 300-500 euros per month and it comes with a decent amount of space for your room. Finding a room is quite easy by just applying to the Facebook groups or kamernet.nl. You’ll undergo a trial day in which the people who already live in the house will check who you are and whether you fit into the house atmosphere. Most houses are close by the university and pretty much everything else is too, which makes it very convenient. Going to Holland you’ll definitely need a bike to get around and public transportation is pretty easy to figure out. Food is the same price as in Australia, maybe slightly cheaper in the long run. Overall, if you have 1600 AUD per month available you’ll be good to go. You can always go cheaper but you’ll want to do some exploring and hang out with friends/go out etc.

There are a decent amount of international people at the university if you don’t have the chance to socialize with the locals and there are enough gatherings in the beginning of the year so that you can meet new friends. Don’t be afraid to step off to a Dutch person as they might seem quite to themselves or their friends, we’re quite friendly! I would definitely recommend going to a football or hockey game, these the biggest sports in the country and will attract a lot of fun crowds and good moments. Ajax is the biggest football club in the Netherlands and have the best atmospheres in the game. The country is quite small so really get out of the city and explore the country, from Amsterdam to the beach and try to check out Rotterdam.

Absolutely incredible snowy winter in Canada

Rick Somers, Bachelor of Engineering (Honours), University of Calgary, Canada, Semester 1, 2019

It is difficult to put words; just how incredible the exchange experience was for me.

How does one begin to summarize the best semester of one’s life?

I went on exchange to the University of Calgary in Canada for the 2019 Winter semester. I’ll start by saying that you haven’t experienced Winter until you’ve been in a Canadian Winter. My definition of ‘cold’ definitely changed. You begin to feel very Canadian when you start to look at -10°C as “not that cold.” One of my most vivid memories of this climate was when Spring finally arrived and the temperature rose to a lovely 10°C. The normal attire across the city quickly became t-shirts and shorts, just like the summer wear of Brisbane.

Of course, there’s snow. Yes, it’s absolutely everywhere. Snow can fall in Calgary for 6 months of the year. Slipping and falling on icy pathways became somewhat of a regularity for me and my uncoordinated self, but this only added to the experience.

As for the Uni, it definitely has a very unique feel, atmosphere and culture. Buildings are connected via tunnels, so you don’t have to go out into the cold between classes. Since lectures aren’t recorded here, people actually show up to classes and the university is bustling with activity because of it. On top of this, there are heaps of awesome facilities on campus that are free to use for students. I made frequent use of the bouldering wall and rock-climbing gym, as well as the ice-skating ring and the gym. Skiing, sporting and other outdoor equipment can be rented for cheap at the uni as well!

The university provided plenty of opportunities to meet with other exchange students and I quickly found myself among a large group of friends from all around the world. Most exchange students stay on-campus in the Cascade hall. All the on-campus housing blocks are right on the university grounds and are connected via tunnels. I decided to stay off-campus, in a share house with some Canadian students.

I would recommend this route, only if you’re within walking distance of the uni; waiting in the freezing cold for public transport really isn’t fun. It was with these Canadian students that I really got to understand what being a Calgarian was all about. Lots of ice hockey was both watched and played, and I gained a real affinity for country music and poutine. Also, with Banff and the Rocky Mountains being an hour drive away, I found Calgary to be perfect for the outdoor loving, adventurous side of me. Nothing compares to the exchange experience, it was absolutely incredible!

My winter experience in Canada

Teagan Braysher, Bachelor of Justice, University of Calgary, Canada, Semester 1, 2019

Hi! I’m Teagan and I went on exchange for semester one this year to the University of Calgary, located in the city of Calgary in Alberta, Canada.

I lived on campus in the university accommodation, I was staying in a four-bedroom apartment (pictured below) and had three roommates, two were other exchange students and the other was a Canadian student. The campus had a lot of facilities, like a gym that was free for all students, a dining centre, a library, and lots of common spaces for students. The only issue I had with the university itself was the lack of communication from them regarding the important exchange information- e.g. where to go on the first day, what was and was not provided in the accommodation, university cards and expenses.

I found the academics of the university very different to QUT, the biggest difference being that they did not record their lectures or make resources readily available online. Another difference was that their academic semester starts in September, so even though I was doing my first semester of the year as per QUT’s academic calendar, it was semester two at the University of Calgary.

I found Canada to have about the same cost of living as Australia but maybe slightly more expensive for meat and produce, the only real differences being that it is customary to tip and that the sales tax is added on rather than being included in the price.  I feel that culturally Canada was very similar to Australia as well and my biggest shock was the obviously weather difference. The lowest recorded temperature when I was there was -32◦C on February 12th and the highest temperature was 20◦C on May 5th. So it was a little bit colder than Australia.

I was surprised to experience severe home sickness during my time in Canada, while I tried to not let this disturb my experience, being so far away from home was difficult to manage. Luckily, I was able to video chat with my family and friends often and talk about it with other exchange students who were feeling the same. I found that I was also quite anxious about money as I was unable to get a job in Canada due to their rules and the time of year I went.

The best highlights of my exchange were making new friends from around the world and going to live sports- especially seeing hockey games and lacrosse games. Another highlight was when the university organised for the exchange students to go to Banff where we walked across a frozen lake, saw some Canadian wildlife and drove through the Canadian Rockies. I was also able to travel around Canada and see places like Drumheller, Montreal, Ottawa and Toronto, and how they compared to both Australia and Calgary.

I had a fantastic time on exchange overall, it was well worth the money and time spent and I would definitely recommend going on exchange. I would advise anyone looking to go on exchange to carefully look at the host university to what they offer and possibly try to contact any current students for their opinions and feedback.

A semester at Leeds

It was quite late in my degree by the time I decided to do a student exchange, but I’m so glad I did because it’s one of the best decisions I’ve ever made! I chose the University of Leeds due to its academic reputation and atmosphere.

Culture

Before arriving in Leeds, I didn’t think there would be much of a cultural difference between England and Australia. But after living there for six months, and immersing myself in the community, I definitely noticed a few stark cultural differences. From simple things like what’s available at supermarkets, to how the locals interact with you and each other – sometimes their English accents are so difficult to understand it sounds like they’re speaking another language!

The University

Within the university, there was such great community spirit with a seemingly endless number of clubs and societies for literally any activity you could imagine! In terms of study, I found Leeds to have a reasonably similar teaching style to QUT. However, Leeds was very strict and rule-abiding about a lot of things. Attendance for tutorials was compulsory and recorded, so if you missed more than two or three classes you were contacted by the unit coordinator. They also took down lecture attendance! Lectures were sometimes recorded (depending on the subject) but the slides were always available online.

Travel

The UK is a fantastic base for easy and cheap travel throughout Europe. There is a small airport at Leeds but I preferred to use Manchester airport (1 hour train away) because flights from there were usually cheaper and more regular. My main mode of transportation throughout the UK however was buses. Although they do take a bit longer, they’re so much cheaper and I didn’t find them too uncomfortable! Transportation is something to consider early on though, because if you’re planning on catching trains then it’s definitely worth investing in a discounted rail pass from the beginning.

Accommodation

I stayed in student-based accommodation at Mary Morris House – a student apartment block in a nearby suburb of Headingley. There were frequent buses to the city but I usually just walked for 30 mins. Headingley was a lovely suburb to live in though – it mostly consisted of students and the main street was primarily full of pubs and op-shops! In terms of cost of living, it was quite similar to Brisbane, slightly more expensive due to the exchange rate at the time but very doable to stick to a limited budget for day-to-day living.

Leeds

Yorkshire is such a beautiful part of England- from York itself to surrounding towns; the country is full of such rich history. As an architectural design student, I was just in love with the ancient buildings and gorgeous streetscapes as well as the landscape in the nearby moors. Leeds is such a massive student city and has so many international exchange students who are always looking to make friends and have a good time. The city is full of gorgeous old buildings and there are always activities on a daily basis!

Overall, this experience was even better than I’d hoped for! Meeting so many incredible friends and travelling so frequently, I loved every minute of it and would absolutely recommend doing an exchange!

Ljubljana: a City of Rich Culture and Traditions

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Nadia L., Bachelor of Business / Mass Communication

University of Ljubljana, Slovenia (Semester 1, 2019)

 

In early February I left my job, my friends and my family behind to study for a semester in Ljubljana, Slovenia. Known as a ‘student city’ for its young population, lively events and student perks I am so glad for the time that I spent there. I made many lifelong friends from all over the world and was able to become more confident and independent.

Academic Life

When the semester first began, I felt overwhelmed with assessment. While QUT generally requires two or three key assessments per unit, many of my Slovenian subjects involved a presentation or essay each week. Although highly involved, these tasks only accounted for 50% of your grade in total, with a big exam making up the other half at the end. The curriculum had a big focus on group assignments, in-class participation and presentations. However, I quickly learned that despite the extra workload, a less rigorous marking process meant it was much easier to get a good grade. Once I learned this, my exchange became much less stressful and I was able to enjoy time at events and exploring the country with new friends.

Exchange Orientation Day at Faculty of Business and Economics

Leisure

Ljubljana at Sunset

 

Ljubljana is a city of rich culture and traditions. On a sunny day it’s common for people to hike to the Castle for a picnic overlooking the city, or to enjoy drinks and a meal along the river with friends. There were also regular events for exchange students organised by two student associations. These included trips to Prian, Lake Bled, skiing in the mountains, Vienna, Bratislava, Budapest and more. They also organised a student party every Tuesday and Thursday night – and karaoke Wednesdays. There was definitely never a dull moment!

 

Food

Exploring the City Centre

 

All students in Slovenia are eligible for BONI, a Government subsidy for 2 meals per day, or 30 meals per month. This meant students could get discounted meals from anywhere in the city, ranging from completely free to just 4 euros for an entire meal. Think a burger and chips, or a whole pizza, plus soup and salad! This was many of our exchange student’s favourite part of exchange and it was common for friends to eat out regularly for lunch or dinner.

 

Exercise

With such cheap food many of us were worried about gaining weight. The Faculty of Business and Economics offers a range of free athletic programs that you can join at the start of semester including basketball, boxing, football, volleyball and aerobics. These classes were quite far from my accommodation, so I didn’t end up participating. Instead, I joined a nearby gym.

All gyms in Ljubljana were considerably cheaper than in Brisbane. The two main ones near the business faculty are Alpha gym and Gym24. I went to the latter and would highly recommend it – the classes, equipment and facilities were all great. Free gyms are also available at the dorms.

Hiking mountains near Ljubljana

Travel

Ljubljana is quite small so almost everything is within walking distance. There is also a decent bus system which costs 1.20 euro for a one-way trip. You will need to use a machine to get the equivalent of a go-card first as they don’t accept cash on board. However, myself and many other students opted to purchase a second-hand bike for the duration of our stay. I highly recommend this option. Ljubljana is pretty flat across the whole city and has a great infrastructure for bikes – plus you don’t need to wear a helmet!

Given its central location it was easy to travel to other European countries from Slovenia. Flixbus was the cheapest, easiest and most popular way to travel. I got pretty lucky with my accommodation, which was super close to the central bus stop. From there I was able to travel to cities in Italy, Austria, Hungary and Croatia with ease. However, if you want to travel a bit further away, flights from the Slovenian airport were quite limited and expensive. In most cases I’d recommend taking a Flixbus to a bigger airport for cheaper flights!

 

My time in Ljubljana was really special. I made so many fun memories and lifelong friends from around the world that are already planning their trips to Australia! Despite the difficulties of being away from home I would do it all again in a heartbeat. I really recommend that everyone takes advantage of the opportunity to study abroad!

 

Ljubljana City Centre

Ljubljana City Centre

 

 

 

 

 

My Exchange in Texas: A&M University

Isaac Farrell, IX30 Bachelor of Business and Mathematics

Host University: A&M University, Texas, USA (Semester 2, 2019)

My exchange was arguably the greatest experience of my life to date. Living in a completely different culture is something that I would recommend everyone to do at some point in their life. It takes you well outside of your comfort zone and makes you grow up fast. In terms of my experience, I found that living in Texas was interesting. The people aren’t all rednecks as many of us believe, but they are some of the nicest people on this Earth.

Texas, USA

Texas A&M University is in a small Christian town called College Station. Its Christian roots are the basis of everybody’s day-to-day life, and it is why they are so kind and caring. It doesn’t matter if you’ve just met someone, you are already friends. An amazing example of their kindness is my friend Mimi’s roommate. Mimi had just moved into the dorm and had known her roommate for 4 days before her birthday came. Not only did her roommate buy her presents, but Mimi’s roommate’s parents also bought her a gift and a surprise birthday cake. Their kindness is unprecedented.

Another amazing part of living and breathing the Texas lifestyle was their love for all thing’s sports. Whether you were interested in football, basketball, baseball, hockey, tennis, or anything else, there was always games being played, and always people that wanted to talk with you about it. Their passion for their teams and their university is amazing. If you love sport, you will LOVE Texas A&M.

Football Field, Texas

The last thing I want to reflect on is the country bars. These bars are like the movies. You’ll go out with some of your exchange friends or American pals to these bars multiple times a week. They are the best place to relax and hang out with people. Instead of flashing lights and dance music, Texas opts for a more old-fashioned approach, with country music, line-dancing, and Texas two-stepping flooding out the doors. It is truly an amazing atmosphere to be a part of.

I don’t regret one second of my exchange at Texas A&M and I encourage every single person to go on exchange because (whilst it sounds cliche) it will change your life.

Spain Student Exchange Summary

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Kirra Sodhi

Universidad Carlos III Madrid, Madrid

Host Country

Deciding on a host country was one of the most difficult parts of my application process. I was comparing countries like Ireland to Norway to Singapore. However, I decided to go to Spain for several different reasons. Firstly, I had always wanted to visit the country, I was so intrigued with there fun and chilled out way of life (which eventually became quite annoying as nothing was ever open). Then there was the weather, now I know that we get a lot of sun, but Madrid is always sunny, in fact I could probably count only 5 days during my semester where there was grey skies. The people of Spain are also so welcoming, even if you know nothing about the language. I originally wanted to study in Barcelona because I though it was an amazing city, which was so multicultural and consisted of many aspects including arts, sports and most importantly beautiful beaches. However, as my business program was only offered in Madrid, I ended up going there instead (which was still a win). As the capital of Spain, Madrid was lively at all hours of the day, filled with amazing food, shops, festivals and lots of street performance. I was really into this traditional Spanish city and all its little quirks.

University and Campus

The university I went to was Universidad Carlos III Madrid, which located outside the city a bit, in a suburb called Getafe and took about 20 – 40min by train from Madrid’s central station (Sol). Compared to QUT’s modern facilities, the school seemed surprisingly quite old with chalk boards in the classrooms. I also found the education system to be dysfunctional and very unorganized, which most exchange students I met there agreed with. All the classes were pretty easy to pass, and the assessment pieces were not too hard. Also, I found that group assignments are very popular. All the classes were done in English which was fortunate since I knew zero Spanish.

Accommodation

This was very different to organize and caused myself I lot of stress when preparing for exchange. On campus accommodation was full and honestly, I would not recommend it as it is located in Getafe which is a very small and basic town. Madrid’s student rental services were various and helpful. For me, I often used be roomers, spotahome and uniplaces to search for apartments. The apartment which I lived in was owned by HELP MADRID they offered good accommodation but definitely ripped you off. I was constantly being charged extra for services like water and gas and each month the charges would increase by sometimes 50 euros which blew my budget out. Apart from this I did enjoy the accommodation, I lived with 11 people all exchange students mostly from the USA. Plus the best thing about the apartment was our location, basically in the middle of Sol, the main plaza was right around the corner.

Conclusion

Spain is an amazing place to go on exchange, especially as it is a large and central European city with something to explore every day. Compared to other European countries, I found it to be relatively cheap, which was definitely a big bonus. Having the ability to travel every weekend was amazing and I was able to see so many countries that I could not imagine.

My advice any future global student is that exchange can challenge you in more ways than you would expect, but the great thing is that you will grow as a person, make amazing friends and have the craziest lifelong memories along the way.

 

Stand Out Go North

Nikoletta Spathis

BI Norwegian Business School, Norway

Between its world-class mountain scapes, Northern Lights and ancient history, Norway has become a popular destination, not only for travel but for education and employment. I was fortunate enough to study in its capital, Oslo, a cosmopolitan city set amongst the fjords and forests where breath-taking nature is just one step outside the door.

University Life

BI Norwegian Business School is the largest business school in Norway and the second largest in all of Europe. Located in the urban area of Nydalen, BI can be visually described as a modern architectural masterpiece, with four main buildings connected by a glass pavilion. This design was highly beneficial during the colder seasons as it made it easy for students to move around the buildings without having to embrace the negative twelve or if lucky, negative fifteen temperatures.

BI has a strong focus on keeping close ties with the business world which enables all students to partake in various opportunities. Undertaking the specialization in Shipping Management, I was able to attend a number of industry related excursions and seminars which were extremely insightful and beneficial. In addition, the university ran professional networking events. One such event was ‘Coffee Hour’ where a ‘hot topic’ was discussed by an industry professional (e.g. politicians, CEOs, researchers, etc.). During my exchange, I attended a discussion on gender equality and the economy. This discussion was presented by eminent speakers including former U.S Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

The approach to learning at university is somewhat different to what we are used to at QUT. For example, there is no distinction between lectures and tutorials which means classes run for three hour blocks. Although attendance is not compulsory, it is highly recommended as there are no recordings. The workload during the semester is relatively relaxed as there are hardly any assignments! However, it is important to keep studying as most units only have ONE 100 percent end of semester exam. Although the academic structure is different, it is relatively easy to adapt as all the teaching staff are extremely helpful and understanding.

Everyday Life

Norway is a very advanced nation with high wages and living standards which means that everything is expensive, especially for students. The Norwegian currency can be a little confusing at first as they work in large numeric values, for example, AUD$17.00 is equal to NOK100.

Within the first two days of arriving in Oslo a trip to IKEA is a must for all those items that did not fit within the luggage limit from Australia! Located 15 minutes from the city centre, a free IKEA shuttle bus operates daily. There are other homeware stores, like Clas Ohlson and Europris which are relatively inexpensive with stores across the city. On average, grocery shopping can add up pretty quickly, therefore it is wise to look at the weekly promotions of the various supermarkets (e.g. Meny, Coop, Joker, Extra). Unfortunately, it is not economically viable to constantly eat out as it is very expensive. Even fast food chains, like McDonalds, are considerably more expensive when compared to prices in Australia. A must have app to download is ‘TooGood ToGo.’ On this app you purchase a mystery bag, filled with various food items, from your chosen store. For example, I once received two loafs of bread, three sandwiches, two pastries, and a smoothie for only NOK35 – roughly AUD$5.80. The main thing to understand is that Norway is expensive, however, there are ways to minimize costs.

Navigating around Oslo is relatively easy as it has one of the most sophisticated and on-time transport systems in the world. As a student, discounted transport fares apply for all major transport (bus, train and ferry). However, this discount only applies when a 30-day ticket is purchased (around NOK550 which is equal to AUD$90- this may seem expensive, but it works out the cheapest). Even if you are not certain that you will use public transport daily, it is still worth purchasing the 30-day ticket as single tickets are costly.

Travelling is a must both within Norway and beyond. Nature abounds in Norway so making the most of it by travelling to explore the far South to the far North is a must. The only negative about travelling within Norway is the expense. However, planning ahead helps. It is often possible to pick up cheaper flights when you are flexible about your travel plans and staying in an Airbnb are a must. My most memorable visit, within Norway, was to the Telemark region where I was lucky enough to witness nature’s winter magic, the aurora borealis. Once you have explored every inch of Norway, travelling around Europe will seem incredibly inexpensive.

Whether it be for one or two semesters, going abroad may be a daunting thought, however, you will not regret your decision.

Stand out! Take the leap and embrace all the extremes that going North has to offer.

Dreams Come True: My Exchange to Kyoto, Japan at Ritsumeikan University

Chen Lang (Joyce) Yu, Bachelor of Design (Architectural Studies) (Honours) 

Host university: Ritsumeikan University in Kyoto, Japan

So it’s a bit of a childhood dream to go on exchange in Japan and study Japanese. Using the elective credits that I had with my architectural course, I was grateful to have been given the opportunity to go to Ritsumeikan University in Kyoto, Japan. Kyoto is pretty much on every tourist’s list to visit if they came to Japan, the city is scattered with temples, shrines, museums and historical places that reminisce a time when Kyoto was the capital. Living here only served to reinforce that. There are endless little niches of culture, old and new, traditional and modern, living side by side each other and it’s quite incredible.

I applied for Ritsumeikan University for the SKP (Study in Kyoto) program that they offer for international students, specifically the IJL (Intensive Japanese Learning track). Coming here in late March, I was able to catch the cherry blossom season and it was spectacular.

Cherry Blossom in Kyoto

For the semester, I undertook Japanese lessons every day and each week; there would be so much content to be learned – grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation etc. I must admit, it was somewhat stressful, but at the same time I have learned a lot. From almost no Japanese language experience to being able to hold simple conversation with local Japanese students, the progress was slow but rewarding.

Luckily, Ritsumeikan University offers dormitory housing for international students, which saved me the hassle of looking for my own accommodation. By far the dorm life was one of the most rewarding experiences for me and my stay in Kyoto. I was able to meet and make friends with people from all over the world who also shared my enthusiasm for studying Japanese and learning its culture. These people have become some lifelong friends that I hope to be able to visit them in their part of the world.

Some of the lifelong friends I made in Kyoto