A Unique Experience in a New City

Dominic Dall’Osto, Bachelor of Engineering

Short-term program: Hessen University ‘Hessen International Summer University – Kassel’

Germany (June/July 2018)

I’ve just returned from a 4 week short-term program in Kassel, Germany – the International Summer University (ISU). I was part of a group of 45 students from all over the world at the ISU. Well, every continent apart from Antarctica. The program consisted of studying German, along with a choice of classes in Environmental Engineering, German Culture, or Nanoscience. We also had a lot of free time to explore the city, as well as travel around Germany.

The best part of the program, though, was the homestay component. I stayed with my host mum, Kristin, and 2 other students from Colombia, in a small farming village in the outskirts of town. It was amazing to wake up every morning, look out over the green fields and see farmers starting their work, but only be a 45 minute train ride away from the city centre. It was also great to live with 2 other students in the program – we shared a lot of new experiences getting to know Kassel, learning German, and cheering for each other’s countries in the World Cup!

The view from my room over our backyard.

My new roommates!

I also spent a lot of time exploring the sights of Kassel. The city’s most famous landmark is the Herkules monument. It is perched 500 metres above the town with a huge complex of water fountains leading down to a castle at the bottom. A castle in Kassel, who’d have thought?! Twice a week the water is turned on and the site fills with tourists following the water down the mountain; through the fountains, down an artificial waterfall, under the Devil’s Bridge, along an aqueduct, and shooting 50 m high into the air at the bottom. All of it is powered only by natural water pressure and has been running for over 300 years!

The beautiful view from the Herkules (ignore the cranes and tourists).

Speaking of powering things with water pressure (smooth segue!) I studied environmental engineering during my time at the University of Kassel. We had guest lectures from experts at the university, and nearby research institutes. But the best bit was going on field trips to see renewable energy technologies in action. We visited a farming village that had built a biogas plant to provide its electricity and heat requirements. We also had the chance to go inside a wind turbine to examine it up close. They’re a lot bigger than they look from a distance! Thanks must also go out to the amazing tutors from the uni who looked after us and kept us entertained throughout the program!

Visiting a wind farm. Fellow students for scale.

A Biogas tank in the village of Jühnde.

Another highlight was the group trip to Berlin during the program. Especially interesting were the stories told by the program director, Jürgen, who had experienced the separation between East and West Germany first hand. Hearing his accounts of waiting for 5 hours at the border while his car was searched were chilling. We also caught Germany’s capital in the grips of World Cup fever, with a huge public viewing at the Brandenburg Gate. Unfortunately, spirits dropped after Germany got knocked out.

Overall, the Kassel ISU program was a great and unique experience: living with a German family, but also spending so much time with the other students that they became like family; exploring a new city; learning a new language; being taught by experts in the field of environmental engineering; and generally enjoying the summer in Germany. I would definitely recommend Kassel’s International Summer University program!

A Memorable German Experience in Kassel

Arun Pathmanathan, Bachelor of Engineering

Short-term program: Hessen University ‘Hessen International Summer University – Kassel’

Germany (June/July 2018)

I wanted to do a short-term exchange program which I thought would help me to develop my knowledge on the subject that I wanted to pursue, to learn new culture and languages and to meet different people from different parts of the world. Therefore, I thought of applying for the Hessen International Summer University program. Since I am an engineering student, I selected the engineering modules that were offered by Hessen International Summer University program which was held in the University of Kassel.

Kassel is a city located in the northern Hesse, Germany. Kassel had many historical palaces and parks including the Bergpark Wilhelmshöhe which was considered the second largest park on a hill slope in the world. Staying in such a place for four weeks was a new experience, studying there with students from different countries gave me a chance to get to know their cultures and traditions and their languages.

Throughout our stay in Kassel, the University of Kassel took us on excursions to different places in Kassel and made us participate in German Folk Dance, hiking and many other activities apart from studying. I think having to just study the whole four weeks would have made our experience miserable, but the ISU had different kinds of activities for us which made our experience in Kassel memorable.

Kassel is a city located in the northern Hesse, Germany.

The location of the University of Kassel was very convenient for us as it was located in the city. The cafeteria of the University was an advantage for us as the food that they had was really good and therefore, most of the students often ate their lunch there.

My accommodation was in a homestay with a German family, and the place was about 5km away from the university. The place was quiet and clean and the facilities were good. Since the public transportation were good in Kassel, there wasn’t any problem of travelling to the University or any other place that I wanted to go.

In terms of studies and other activities, I had a very good time in Kassel. There is no point of anyone going just to concentrate on studies, without participating in other activities organised by the University. By attending those other activities you can learn their culture, meet new people, and of course have fun.

Getting Creative in Glasgow

Anna Banszel, Bachelor of Design (Architecture) 

Short-term Program: University of Glasgow ‘Scottish Urban Landscapes in Film and Glass’

Scotland (July 2018)

While Brisbane shivered this winter I was over in sunny Britain studying Scottish Urban
Landscape in Film and Glass at the Glasgow School of Art (GSA). This intense
one-week course combined research with technical experience in the renowned
photography and glass workshops at the GSA.

Through my research I discovered that Glasgow has been settled since prehistoric
times and rapidly expanded during the 16th century when traders and craftspeople
converged in the city. Glasgow still maintains that legacy of quality of craftsmanship,
with the GSA being an exemplar of world-class art education.

On day one and two I learnt 35mm photography. With a camera provided by the
university I roamed the gritty streets of Glasgow capturing moments of urbanity in
one of the most beautiful and diverse cities I have ever experienced. Developing my
film in the dark rooms was both technically and creatively challenging. There is a lot of
scope for creative expression after the film is shot. In making my prints from my
negatives I experimented with exposure and filter to get the results I was after.

Photography lab.

For days three to five we moved into the glass studios to learn glass art. The
photographs I developed on my first two days informed the design of my bespoke
stained glass panel. In this studio I learnt how to design my panel, cut the glass,
solder the lead, apply the putty between the lead and glass and paint the glass.

Glass art studio.

On the last day all the international students were invited to a gathering were we
met other students and saw the work people had produced. All the staff at GSA
were really friendly and approachable. Though it’s part of huge university the vibe
at the GSA is more like a boutique studio run by artists who value collaboration and
push the creative boundaries.

Glass and photos.

Before I took this course, I’ll admit Glasgow was never on my list of places to see. I
had been to Edinburgh and the Scottish highlands and considered Scotland ticked
off my travel list. Big mistake – Glasgow is brilliant! If you’re after culture it’s home
to fine institutions like the Scottish Ballet, if you want a social atmosphere head to
the West End and explore the bars. If you want history there are loads of museums
and if fancy gardens the Glasgow Botanic Gardens can take a whole day to
explore. It doesn’t get dark till after 10pm either, so you can take your time. One of
my favourite nights out was seeing Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing in the
Botanic Gardens for five pounds.

Glasgow skyline.

Glasgow university.

I stayed at the GSA accommodation where I had my own ensuite room. It was
modern and clean with a shared kitchen with all the facilities needed to cook meals.
With so many places to eat out I only really used the kitchen for breakfasts but if I’d
been there for longer I would have been cooking up a storm. Washing machines
were also available for laundry, it was five minutes walk from the studios and
staffed until 7pm every day. Price of living is similar to Australia. For lunch I usually
went to a convenience store and got a sandwich or salad for about $5 AUD. Once I
was in Glasgow I walked everywhere, or took a black cab if it was late at night.
Getting to Glasgow from London or Edinburgh is easiest by rail and prices are
lower if you book online in advance.

My experience at GSA differed from my experience at QUT in that GSA was all
studio based. Other than that it was similar – we learnt the techniques, studied the
context and worked from a design brief under the guidance of our tutors.

If I could offer advice to anyone considering taking this course is to go with an open
mind and willingness to push yourself creatively. I’d also recommend you give
yourself a few days either side of your course to explore the city and meet some
locals. I extended my trip to three weeks to visit London and Copenhagen. It was
great to have that down time to balance the trip with work and play.
My only complaint about this course was that it wasn’t long enough!

Me in London.

Opening My Eyes to the Beauty of Germany

Sophie Heather, Bachelor of Fine Arts

Short-term program: Hessen University ‘Hessen International Summer University – Fulda’

Germany (July/August 2018)

My time in the 2018 ISU Fulda was life changing. It’s hard to find the words that will give justice to the program. I applied not expecting to be accepted, but I was, and I had 8 weeks to get organised! (I didn’t have a passport…eeek!)

Going into the program I hadn’t heard much about Germany aside from it’s infamous history. Friends would ask me if I could speak any German, to which I replied “no, but we learn it as part of the program”. I expected to leave the trip being relatively fluent in German. Haha. The language is very hard as the grammar is very different to English.

I am welcomed into Fulda by the German tutors – students who attend the host university. The tutors ran every activity and were the people we consulted if we had any issues. They were so funny, welcoming and understanding – I hope to see them in the future. They are fluent in English and are just absolutely lovely. I am given directions to my accommodation which require me to take a bus. I learn that public transport is free for university students! This ended up saving me a lot of money.

Brandenburg Gate

There were four types of accommodation; I was lucky to be in the hostel where I had my own room and shared kitchen and bathroom. Instantly, I made friends with the other girls from the program; on the first night they were so welcoming and invited me to go explore Fulda with them! The second I started talking to these girls I noticed how unusual the Australian accent is – it was a really strange moment. I was the only Australian in my hostel, and one out of four in the program! Australians made 1 out of the 15 different nationalities that attended ISU Fulda in 2018.

I made friends from all over the world.

For the seminar, I chose Music Therapy. My class was very small, I was 1 of 8 students! Additional to Australian students there were Portuguese, Russian and Israeli students. The seminar was very fun as we got to play a variety of instruments including rare instruments one wouldn’t typically know. Our teacher, Wolfgang, was highly energetic and took an interest in our cultures; as half our class were from Israel, we learnt a lot about their culture and the Jewish religion which I found fascinating.

Playing rare instruments in the music therapy program.

I was in the Beginner German class and was taught by the lovely Jana – a Russian woman who loved to learn languages! She taught us through singing songs whilst she played the guitar, it was very helpful! There were also days where she took us out blueberry picking, and on the last day to get some cake; she has the kindest heart.

The Mensa is the campus cafeteria – the food is so cheap! Each day there are 8 new meal options and they always tasted so good! You could get a big bowl of pasta for 1.50 Euros! There were lots of salads and snacks as well as vegetarian and vegan options! QUT seriously needs one of these!

ISU really opened my eyes to the beauty of Germany. I had learnt in school the brief history of the country during the World Wars and the Cold War. However, to actually go to the places that were talked about (Point Alpha, The Berlin Wall, concentration camps) it was only then that the history lessons made sense. It was eye opening to learn about the suffrage of people due to power falling in the wrong hands. It was haunting to walk upon grounds where millions were murdered. It was incredible to see modern Germany where the civilians accept the past and continue to create a nation that focuses on love and peace.

Upon returning to Australia, everyone would ask me “what was the best bit?” I can’t think of one particular time, however, my favourite aspect of the trip was that I made so many friends. I was able to walk up to anyone and have a great conversation. I made lifelong friends from all over the globe; my most closest friends live in: The USA, France, Netherlands, Portugal and India. I learnt so much about their cultures, and they were so interested to learn about mine. I still keep in contact with these people and I intend to for a very long time.

The best part was I was able to walk up to anyone and have a conversation.

The trip threw me in the deep end and I am so appreciative QUT gave me this opportunity to broaden my horizons. If anyone is wanting to study overseas but does not want to stay long term, this is your program!

My Short but Sweet Time in the United Kingdom

Su Jin Lim, Masters of Business

Short-term program: University of Exeter ‘International Summer School’

England (June/July 2018)

It had always been a lifelong dream of mine to study in the UK; therefore when I saw QUT’s Global Exchange Portal advertising the International Summer School Program at the University of Exeter, I knew I had to do it.

In order to make full use of my winter break, I made the choice to extend my trip and arrive 2 weeks before summer school began. In that time span, I took the opportunity to sight see around London and the beautiful Welsh countryside. I had the opportunity of visiting, Highgate Cemetery (The burial place of Karl Marx), shopping along Oxford Street, and most importantly going to the Harry Potter Studio Tour in Leavesden (It would have been blasphemous for me not to do so!). I spent one week in Wales with my relatives at their smallholdings estate up in Lampeter. Over there we drove around to different places and visited historical sites and museums.

One of the “must-have” shots for anyone who visits the Harry Potter studios.

I then returned to Convent Garden in London where my summer school program began. By this time, London was experiencing one of the worst heat waves, which really was equivalent to a typical Brissie Summer, except it was a lot more humid. We were scheduled to stay in London for the next 4 days for sightseeing. The summer school coordinators planned the trip such that we had plenty of leisure time to explore the city on our own. Luckily for me, I managed to meet friends on the first day of the program, they became my travel buddies throughout the trip. During our stay in London, we were taken to see iconic places such as Tower Bridge, House of Parliament, Trafalgar Square, and the British Museum. The most memorable part of the trip was having the opportunity to watch Shakespeare’s “A Winter’s Tale” at the Globe Theatre just like how people used to watch it back in the day (i.e. standing up for the whole play!). Never have I ever cried and laughed so hard watching a play, the acting and the whole experience of it was honestly quite moving.

Waiting for the play to begin at the Globe Theatre.

Bright and early on our last day in London, we boarded our buses for the 4 ½ hour journey to Exeter. The moment we arrived in Exeter, we were greeted with typical British weather which quite ironically I found to be quite warm and welcoming. I think it was because it was the English weather I was expecting to experience rather than the warm sticky weather. We were all assigned rooms at the on campus accommodation at the University of Exeter. Each of us had our own ensuite toilets, a bed, and a large desk. I technically shared a “flat” with 5 other students and we all had access to a common kitchen. Meals were not catered for, which allowed us full freedom to plan all our meals. Quick tip: I highly recommend you try eating-in when you can; it gives you the opportunity to learn how to cook for yourself but to also to learn the cuisine of other international students cooking in the flat as well. My accommodation was a 10 minute walk to campus and all its facilities which was really convenient for us.    

The Iconic University of Exeter “Rock”.

Class picture on our last day of class with our two module facilitators (Standing on the far left and right).

I enrolled for the “Adapting Cognitive Behavioural Therapy to Improve Accessibility to Psychological Therapies” module at summer school. Classes were 4 hours a day, in 2 hour blocks. Despite the intensity of our classes, I thoroughly enjoyed them as it was highly interactive and very much hands on. I only had 12 other students in my class which gave us the opportunity to really bond with one another and having sessions better tailored to our needs. The assessments for our course were broken down into two parts. Firstly, we had to design a psycho-education leaflet tailored towards international students from a specific country/region. Secondly, we had to give a 30 minute presentation explaining our target sample, design of our leaflet, and how we worked together as a group. 

Visiting the underground tunnels of Exeter.

The town of Bath.

During the two weekends we had at Exeter, we made it a point to do as much sightseeing as we could. We took day trips to the town of Bath (a UNESCO World Heritage site), St. Ives, and we were even adventurous enough to cycle 44km to visit the nearby port town of Exmouth. All of these places were truly amazing and I enjoyed every minute of it.

Overall, I will say that the International School Program at the University of Exeter was amazing such that it allowed you time to learn and having enough time to sightsee, it was really a rewarding experience. Not only did I get the opportunity to visit the beautiful places the UK had to offer, but I was also able to form lifelong friendships with students from all other the globe. To anyone reading this and is interested on going to the UK, I highly recommend applying for this program. You will not regret it, I definitely didn’t J

A Short Summer Spent Studying at Cambridge

Laura Spenceley, Bachelor of Science/Laws

Short-term program: AIM Overseas ‘Cambridge Sciences Summer Program’

England (July 2018)

Not long after my semester one exams this year, I headed to the United Kingdom for a 2-week short-term exchange program at Cambridge University. This program not only met but exceeded every expectation I had – including the surprisingly very hot English Summer.

Life in Cambridge and England

Prior to the program beginning on Sunday the 8th of July, I flew to London (Stansted) and arrived in Cambridge on Friday afternoon. I then had two (very hot) days to explore a beautiful city and get to know the university and some of its colleges prior to my program.

Arriving at Selwyn college

As a student city, Cambridge is very accessible and easy to get around. It was a short half-hour train journey from the Stansted airport, but once you are in Cambridge it is very easy to navigate on foot. Most students and residents of Cambridge prefer cycling as a mode of transport. Considering that the city of Cambridge is mostly comprised of the University itself, Wi-Fi is easily accessible everywhere you go. This was definitely a bonus while travelling and made getting around quite easy.

Arriving at Selwyn college

After 2 weeks at Cambridge, I spent a few days in London and the rest of the week travelling around France to make the most of my trip to the other side of the world – which was quite a relaxing end to a whole lot of learning at the University.

The Summer Program

One of the program highlights would have to be the experience of life at a Cambridge college. While in Australia most students live at home and commute to uni, at a University almost 200 years older than QUT with 31 historical colleges to choose from, students live on campus during term time and either walk or cycle to classes. At Selwyn College, I stayed in a private room which overlooked Old Court and the dining Hall where we had meals each morning and night. This was a quick 5-minute walk to the where all of the Summer courses teaching was held at Sidgwick site (next-door).

The view of Old Court from my accommodation in a college room.

The academic program was run over the course of 2 weeks, with 4 science lectures per day between 9am and 9pm. During these hours, we had morning plenary (core) lectures and evening talks which were each run by a different Cambridge lecturer or subject specialist, as well as 2 elected courses per week. I am glad these gave me the opportunity to study things I probably wouldn’t study at home as part of my science degree, such as learning about Polar Research and Autism Research based in Cambridge. Evening talks included topics such as a mathematician on the Enigma Machine, and the engineering behind the ‘Dambusters’ bouncing bomb during World War 2.

Cambridge University Museum of Zoology.

The University Library

Outside of the classroom, my chosen courses involved two visits to the British Antarctic Survey in Cambridge, the University museums (Museum of Zoology, Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology, and Fitzwilliam Museum). The Summer Program also included a piano recital one night in St. John’s College, a reception for the 95th anniversary of the Program at the beautiful Queens’ College and went on a traditional ‘punt’ on the River Cam over the weekend with some of the other students I met on the course. Our final night as Cambridge students was marked by a formal closing dinner in the dining hall, with the presentation of certificates.

Dining Hall at Selwyn College

Finishing the course.

Two Weeks in Amsterdam

Christopher Atkins, Bachelor of Design

Short-term program: Amsterdam Uni of Applies Sciences “Amsterdam Summer School”

Netherlands (July 2018)

I completed a 2 week summer course in Amsterdam, Netherlands at Amsterdam University of Applied Science. The course was called “Urban Scan” and was aimed at looking into what makes Amsterdam, Amsterdam. How the city was built and how it has changed over time. I found this a helpful course as I am studying Landscape Architecture and some aspects were quite informative.

The other students in my class were from all different disciplines and the course could be taken by anyone from any discipline. The other students were great and I met people from all over the world. We shared many afternoons socialising after class in Amsterdam. The University is close to the city so it was easy to access. The accommodation however, I wouldn’t recommend. I got the accommodation through the Uni and it was a 4 bedroom shared unit with other Dutch students. The place was a mess and some of the house mates had left for home for their Summer. The bathroom clogged and water was everywhere through the unit. The internet was never working and the area was far from the city and didn’t feel too safe at night. I would recommend finding alternate accommodation in or closer to the city/University instead.

Amsterdam city, canals.

 The country itself was amazing, I had been to the Netherlands before so I knew what I was getting into. The locals in Amsterdam all speak perfect English so it is easy to get around. The city itself is a maze! All the streets blend into one and are very similar, with canals everywhere, it’s all part of the fun of Amsterdam I guess. It’s a lot easier if you can get a bike to ride around with, the city is fairly small so if you have a bike you can’t anywhere within 15/20min. The sun is also up till 11PM at night so there is plenty of time to explore the city after class finishes at 5PM.

Amsterdam city, canals.

 The highlight of my trip was probably the bike ride we did with our class. It was a 2 hour trip North of Amsterdam but it went through the countryside, past windmills and old farm houses. We arrived at a lighthouse and had lunch then made our way back to Amsterdam. The whole course was really fun and the teacher was amazing. Most days we’d stop in the afternoon for a drink and some Dutch cheese somewhere in the city, with our teacher explaining Dutch culture and everyone else trading stories from their home country. I really learnt a lot not just about Amsterdam but other parts of the world through my class mates.

View from the bike ride hours North of Amsterdam.

I would highly advise taking this summer course. It was fun, informative, exciting, eye opening and I made new friends. I couldn’t recommend it highly enough…. Just book your own accommodation.

Studying in the Heart of Amsterdam

Natasha Phillips, Bachelor of Behavioural Science (Psychology)/Laws

Short-term program: Amsterdam Uni of Applies Sciences ‘Amsterdam Summer School’

Netherlands (July 2018)

My name is Natasha and when I participated in my short term exchange I was half way through my third year of a dual degree of Law and Psychology at QUT. My exchange program was in Amsterdam, The Netherlands and after reflection I can happily say it was one of the best experiences of my life.

I got to explore the history and culture of Amsterdam by studying there.

I studied an architecture course, this is something which is completely different to my degree at QUT but I am so glad I decided to study this course. Studying architecture in an old city like Amsterdam was incredible because by studying the architecture, I got to study the history and culture of the city and explore the city itself. The program and teaching style was very relaxed compared to my classes at QUT but I thought this was brilliant for a course which was so interactive. Each day we would have class in the morning and then in the afternoon we would go out and explore a different area of the city which was related to our morning class. The campus was based in the heart of the city and this was amazing because before and after class we got the opportunity to explore the city and take in the sights and sounds of Amsterdam. The campus was very modern and the support staff were kind, welcoming and helpful.

This program gave us the opportunity to explore the city after classes.

Amsterdam is a beautiful city and by being an exchange student for two weeks, we got the chance to explore the tourist spots like Anne Frank’s House, the canals and the Amsterdam sign but we also go to experience other aspects of the city which some tourists might not. For example, one day my class rented bikes and we cycled to a beach outside the city and got to see the countryside which surrounded the city. Everyone spoke both Dutch and English and were very friendly so I never had any issues with getting lost or any bad experiences in the city.

The highlight of exchange was the people.

My highlight of my short term exchange was the people I met and the friendships I made. I will forever be grateful for this opportunity because as part of my exchange I now have friends in America, Russia, Norway, Germany and of course The Netherlands. I would highly recommend to any QUT student to participate in a short term exchange and gain credits for their course as an elective because it was the best experience.

Exploring the Architecture of Italy

Audrey Wong, Bachelor of Design

Short-term program: AIM Overseas ‘Rome Architectural Sketchbook’

Italy (June/July 2018)

I found my program through QUT short term program website, and it was organized by AIM Overseas, called Rome Architectural Sketchbook. Our program duration was 3 weeks in Rome, but I’d say the highlight of the program was the after-school life in Italy! On the first weekend, we went to Capri Island and Sorrento, in Southern Italy, and Florence and Pisa on the second. Most of us from the program didn’t know each other beforehand, so the weekend trips were organized only after we met in Rome, and even the train tickets were bought right before the night we go! Apart from the short trips, we also had lots of fun! Our program was about sketching in Rome, so we literally set down on the street and started drawing every day. However, despite such opportunity, there’s just too much to be covered in Rome! For example, the Vatican City, Trevi Fountain, Spanish Steps, and Pantheon were not included in the school schedule. So, we had to squeeze our time to pay them a visit. Another after-school activity we all love is to go grocery shopping! Despite the unforgiving heat condition, we always wanted to go shop at the grocery because the food is cheap and very fresh with lots of varieties. And of course, gelato every day!

GELATO EVERYDAY – you’ll be shocked by the variety of flavour I guarantee.

1st weekend trip to Capri Island and Sorrento

Our Italian tutor (lady with red hair and sun glasses) is the most passionate and enthusiastic lovely lady we’ve ever met!

Touching the columns that was carved in one monolithic one in the Vatican City! Stunned by the architecture there (actually should be stunned by the architecture everywhere in Europe)!

To be honest, this would all sound overwhelming to me before I joined the program. I had quite low self-esteem and self-confidence especially towards socializing. So, I will have to admit that it was quite uneasy to meet new people and make friends at first, but once you’re there in that situation, you realize you actually only have two choices, go and learn to enjoy, or don’t go and regret. So, this was how I pushed myself out of my comfort zone. And I ended up am really proud of myself and really glad that I have met every one of them.

2 Florence and Pisa 2nd weekend trip

Had to go to the Trevi Fountain at 8am coz class starts at 9!

Last day! A group photo finally!

Link to the videos we made for the assignment: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q5RR-NLt-To

Link to the assignment I presented: https://spark.adobe.com/page/2IYI6rRiKydqA/

A Guide to Life at Aarsus University

Mathew Verwater, Bachelor of Business/laws

Short-term program: “Experience Summer at Aarhus University”

Denmark (July/August 2018)

Host University

  1. Academics

Aarhus University similarities with QUT:

–          Summer course classes are similar to workshops (where lectures and tutorials are combined into one class and where the lecturer asks students question and discusses the topic and thoughts on news relating to a topic),

–          Summer courses required students (in law) to read the articles and textbook readings,

–          No mandatory class attendance

Aarhus University differences with QUT:

–          Classes are not recorded and thus, not attending lectures is disadvantageous as some important information id discussed in the subject,

–          Students are required to complete out-of-class work (I completed 3 or 4 different out-of-class work throughout the course)

Attending the summer course classes at Aarhus University, I think, felt very similar to high school classes as the lecturer would ask the students questions and to discuss a topic and thoughts on news

  1. Accommodation

When I was in Denmark, I stayed in the Snogebæksvej dormitory. The dormitory, I think, is like most Australian dormitories.

List of facilities in the Snogebæksvej dormitory:

–          It had a communal kitchen (residents were expected to prepare their own meals),

–          Kitchen, you share your mini fridge with one other person, thus, if you cook a lot it may be difficult to fit both your food and the other’s

–          14 rooms per floor (two floors),

–          Toilet, shower and bedroom with two tables, one cupboard, a desk lamp, and bed (without sheets, blankets, and pillow protector.

–          There was also an apple tree outside the kitchen, so you can get apples for free.

  1. Life on Campus

Aarhus University is a very large university and has buildings located throughout Aarhus. Similar to QUT giving each building a letter, each building at Aarhus University is numbered (for example, mine was number 1451). Each building has about three floors and access to the roof. Classes were three to four times a week (from 9am – 1pm) Each campus, unlike QUT, has its own self-serve cafeteria serving breakfast and lunch. Similar to a buffet. Each plate of food costs approximately $8 and coffee costs approximately $5.50. Once, during each summer semester, the university hands out ice cream to everyone at the university. Life on the campus is similar to life at QUT. So, it’s not that different from what you usually would do at QUT.

It is a large university with buildings throughout Aarhus.

A beautiful Country

Host Country

Denmark is a beautiful country, Aarhus is similar to Brisbane in terms of a mix between nature and city. There are a lot more brick houses and apartments compared to Brisbane. Aarhus also has a lot of places to visit such as the deer park, Moesgaard museum, and the beach. Also, everyone besides senior citizens can speak English so it’s very easy to get around or buy things. However, I do warn that Denmark is quite expensive, so make sure you bring a lot of cash.

There are a lot more brick houses in Aarhus compared to Brisbane.

Aarhus has a lot of places to visit, but it is quite expensive.

Highlights

Visiting Copenhagen and the Viking moot were definitely the highlights of the trip. Copenhagen is the capital of Denmark and has many beautiful sights and places to visit, such as Nyhavn, the Opera House, Christiansborg Palace, and the National Museum of Denmark. The Viking moot was an amazing social program. The Viking moot consisted of watching re-enactments of battles and horse riding. There was also a lot of cool things to buy for friends and yourself at the Viking moot.

Nyhavn in Copenhagen.