Follow in the footsteps of the Beatles… live and study in Liverpool!

University of Liverpool

Location: Liverpool, England

Why Liverpool? Student-friendly city, long history, cost-effective, football, and a rich arts and music scene.

Founded in 1881, The University of Liverpool boasts massive red brick buildings and a long, diverse history, while also being innovative and modern. The university is a leading research institution in the UK.

The University has two on-campus buildings, Melville Grove and Tudor Close, which offer apartment-style accommodation for international and study abroad students. If you wish to live off-campus, given its high student population, Liverpool offers a massive amount of accommodation and a student-tailored lifestyle. The University recommends budgeting around $4000-$5500 (AUD) for a semester, and given its proximity to other European countries, most students will want to budget some more for further travels!

There are plenty of amenities on campus including a fitness centre and sports fields, as well as heaps of things to do off-campus. The city has a great passion for music, art and culture, and plays host to a number of events each year. While you’re here catch a football (soccer) game, or two, at Anfield or Goodison Park.

Meet staff from the University of Liverpool at the QUT Exchange Fair!

 

Clarice’s South Korean Short-Term Exchange Experience

Clarice: Seoul, South Korea – Short Term Program 2016

As a student in Seoul, I find it to be so much cheaper than being a student in Brisbane; especially when it comes to our daily food and caffeine needs. I would barely spend over 10,000won (about AUD11-12) a day while I was studying there and it would cover all my breakfast, lunch and dinner needs. If you’re lazy enough, you could always buy convenience store lunchboxes (which can have things like rice, meat and kimchi) for 3,000-3,800won (AUD4-5) and it is very filling.

Samgyeopsal

And of course, when one is in Seoul, one would need to try the famous “Samgyeopsal” (or “pork belly”) which is the slab of meat in the middle. I find that Korean meats taste vastly different (and honestly, a lot better) from Australian meats. For this meal, we usually barbecue the meats on the plate and accompany it with a few drinks (no guesses as to what those drinks are) and lots of lettuce, to balance the flavour of meat and vegetables. Generally, a meal like this would cost about AUD70, but I had it for about 30,000won (around AUD32) for 3 people.

Painfully cheap….and something I will never get while I’m back in Brisbane.

I would say that Seoul is a wonderful place for an overseas study experience, because it is so different from Australia in terms of culture and student life, and EWHA Woman’s University is an amazing place to find out a lot more about feminist issues (such as the unending justice for the “comfort” women during the Japanese invasion) and that, being feminist does not necessarily mean the Western view of loud and proud feminism, but rather, a social issue that has to be faced with quiet dignity in order to make the world a better place for not only women, but men too.

One of the many delicious lunch that we students would often go out for once morning classes are over.

One of the many delicious lunch that we students would often go out for once morning classes are over.

I was pleasantly surprised to find out that the male professors and most of the male students who were there for the co-ed summer program were also genuine feminists and supported many social issues that women still face.

My time in EWHA has certainly changed me for the better, and helped me in recognising many aspects of myself as a woman that I never knew existed. I will always fondly remember my time there as a student and if given the chance, would not hesitate to do a longer exchange program next time round. I also highly recommend the EWHA Woman’s University International Co-ed Summer College to anyone interested, because I guarantee you will come away learning so much more than just academically.

Does Clarice’s experience interest you? Find out more about QUT’s Short Term Study Options.

Our wonderful history class, with a few people missing, and Prof Michael in the middle. We’re standing in front of EWHA's very own museum which houses a private collection of art and sculpture pieces donated by the alumni of EWHA.

Our wonderful history class, with a few people missing, and Prof Michael in the middle. We’re standing in front of EWHA’s very own museum which houses a private collection of art and sculpture pieces donated by the alumni of EWHA.

My Time in Mannheim

Caitlin: University of Mannheim, Germany – Semester 2, 2015 & Semester 1, 2016

My name is Caitlin and I set out on my year abroad to Europe in July, 2015. At that time, I had no idea that the next year of my life would be the best year yet!! For the next year, I was undertaking my study year abroad at the University of Mannheim, which is located in the South/West part of Germany. This was a city of approximately 360,000 inhabitants and it was here that I made friends from around the world.

Galata Tower, Turkey

Galata Tower, Turkey

Prior to moving into my apartment in Mannheim, I did a contiki tour solo in Turkey and Greece. It was the summertime and I saw the perfect opportunity to embrace the beautiful weather. I highly recommend doing some travel before you start your exchange semester or year, so that you feel a bit more confident towards travelling solo for when you do arrive in your exchange destination.

Highlights

During my year abroad, I had some amazing experiences and was able to share these experiences with the awesome people I met along the way. My favourite parts of the year abroad were the wine festivals in Germany, of course the beer festivals too: P below is a photo of my friends and I at the Stuttgart Volksfest Beer Festival!

My Brother and I in front of Mannheim

My Brother and I in front of Mannheim

Travelling to Amsterdam was amazing, I loved the city’s atmosphere and would go back again in a heartbeat. I was lucky enough to travel to Norway to spend Christmas with one of my closest friends from exchange and experience a proper Norwegian Christmas. I will never forget it!!! There I am below enjoying the Norwegian snow! I would do this year all over again; it will change your life!

To find out more about QUT Student Exchange, visit our website!

Friends for Life at San Jose State University

Charlie: San Jose State University, California, USA – Semester 1, 2016

Hi! I’m Charlie Shaw-Feather and I am studying a Bachelor of Engineering, majoring in Computer and Software Systems. I studied at San Jose State University (SJSU) for the spring semester, 2016.

As I am writing this I am on my way back to San Jose for a holiday to catch up with the friends that I made and the relationships I hope to last a lifetime.

Whilst on exchange I stayed at SJSU’s International house. This was a college owned house situated just off campus for international students, welcoming students from all countries. This formed an integral foundation for the time that I spent in San Jose. They hosted a plethora of different activities and events to engage students allowing them to get out of their comfort zone. When I stayed there was a little over 60 residents, about 12 of which were from the US.

I set out on exchange to experience as much of American college culture as I could and what better way than to join a fraternity. The colleges orientation week coincides with ‘rush week’ which is the time that fraternities and sororities seek new members. ‘Friends for life’; is one of the mottos that is prevalent throughout the Greek (fraternity/sorority) community and it is most certainly true.

The left picture is Tower Hall, an event building on SJSU’s campus. On the right, is Stanley Park in Vancouver, Canada.

The left picture is Tower Hall, an event building on SJSU’s campus. On the right, is Stanley Park in Vancouver, Canada.

 

The whole community is very accepting and it is an extremely rewarding experience. One of the great parts about being in a fraternity is the philanthropic events. For example, Kappa Sigma, the fraternity that I am a member of hosts a series of events each semester to support military veterans.

When planning my finances for my travels I had to not only account for my student exchange but I also had to plan for my short term program before hand as well; I was overseas for 8 months in total. QUT has plenty of different support systems for students including OS-HELP loans and bursaries. Without QUT’s support I would not have been able to experience as much of American culture as I did.

When paying for living expenses one of the reasons that I chose to stay at I-House was that they offered a meal plan. This meal plan was for 7 days a week with extra dining credits to spend on campus restaurants outside of the dining hall. It should be noted that the food was nothing to call home about, other than to complain…

To find out more about QUT Student Exchange Programs, click here!

Life in Sweden & at KTH

Peter: Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden, Semester 1, 2016

Through the QUT Exchange program I had the opportunity to spend not one, but two full semesters abroad in Stockholm, Sweden. I had done some backpacking through South East Asia in the past, but I had never left Australia for more than two months and I had never called another country home. Looking back on it now, I didn’t exactly realise the size of the challenge at hand – moving across the planet to a place where I don’t know anyone or understand the language – but that challenge along with every amazing experience has made it the best year of my life. Aside from learning the ins and outs of Stockholm, by the end of my exchange I had the opportunity to visit 17 countries and meet some incredible people.peter_davis1

My host university in Stockholm was Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan. Sound like a mouthful? Thankfully it’s also called the Royal Institute of Technology in English, but let’s just call it KTH. KTH was founded in 1827 and today is one of the largest and most prestigious technical institutions in Scandinavia. Universities work a little differently in Sweden and don’t tend to offer the same courses in competition with each. In Stockholm, Karolinska acts as the main medical school, Stockholm University specialises in subjects like Law and Business, and KTH is full of the country’s brightest engineers, programmers and scientists (among other things).

Europe has a bachelor-master system in which most people complete five years of study. In Sweden, all students are required to study their bachelor’s degree in Swedish, and their two year masters degree in English. Because of this, I was able to study equivalent units for my four year degree in Australia from fourth and fifth year units in Sweden. The KTH Main Campus was built over 100 years ago and is filled with beautiful red brick buildings, with the main courtyard being something akin to Hogwarts.

peter_davis2Our accommodation was organised through KTH and provided by the state-run SSSB (Stockholm student accommodation). Lappkärsberget or ‘Lappis’ as it is so affectionately known isn’t located on the KTH campus, but is a short walk away from the campus of Stockholm University, which is only one subway stop away. The area houses several thousand people, mostly in corridor rooms. My room was spacious and had its own bathroom and a lot of storage, and each corridor has a kitchen and common area shared between 13 people. In true Swedish style, my neighbourhood was not only near a subway stop, but also surrounded by forest and a short walk from the lake.

Discover more about QUT’s Student Exchange Programs here!

Highlights of my Time in Japan

Jackie: Kansai Gaidai University, Osaka, Japan – Semester 1, 2016

At KGU you have three accommodation options; you can apply for a homestay, apply to live in a dorm or you can find your own options. I chose to live in a dorm because I had never lived independently before. I had always wondered what on campus living was like and it was well worth it. I made close friends with the other girls I lived with and it was a nice area to be in. It wasn’t too far from school or a grocery store or the bus.jackie_4

The highlight of exchange in Japan was the amazingly rich and diverse culture. One day I would be in Osaka (which is known in Japan for being the life of the party) exploring all the weird and quirky things. The next day I would be in Kyoto exploring the incredibly significant and important government building, learning about all of Japans history from my friends who are smarter than me and staring in awe at the Sakura (Cherry Blossoms) wondering how a flower could be so beautiful. (Side note: also the food was amazing. My friends and I still message each other about how much we miss Udon and Sashimi).jackie_3

My exchange was amazing and if I could do it again or go back and extend my trip I would. I learnt so much about myself and other cultures, which I would never have known otherwise. I can’t recommend Japan enough as a host country. I feel like I have seen so much of Japan because of my exchange and for that I will be forever grateful.

Interested in going on a QUT Student Exchange? Learn more here. Or drop in and see our exchange ambassadors at Gardens Point in A Block.

Cost of Living in London and Travel

Hannah: City University London, Semester 1, 2016

I did not fully comprehend how much living in London would cost until I got over there, however I had enough savings to not stress about money, live comfortably and enjoy many travel opportunities. This should definitely be communicated to future exchange students, as I met other students who really limited their opportunities until the end before travelling because they were constantly budgeting. Throughout the semester I had time to travel to Iceland, Switzerland, Budapest, Prague, Vienna and Scotland. I did a few trips in England including Nottingham, Peterborough and Cambridge, although I regret not being organised enough to visit some other places.

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The Alps

After my exams finished, my lease also finished and I begin a five-week solo travel experience across Europe. From London I travelled to Norway before visiting Copenhagen, Berlin, Munich, Innsbruck, Salzburg, Venice, Rome, Florence, Milan, Barcelona, Paris and Amsterdam. It was such an amazing experience I met lovely people in Hostels along the way and saw beautiful architecture, cities and natural landscapes. Travelling was definitely a highlight of my trip although it was lonely at times I made use of every opportunity and I was able to meet a friend made through the exchange program on my last stop in Amsterdam.

Colosseum

Colosseum

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Travel Pic

City University was different from QUT in terms of diversity of culture; it was so refreshing to be in a country and university, embracing difference and acceptance. London is one of the most multicultural countries in the world, although I felt Australia was quite diverse, London was nowhere I had ever been, it was so exciting to be immersed in culture, language and practices. I was able to develop cultural awareness about different cultures through my classes and interactions with other students. My exchange experience has been a truly rewarding and memorable experience I will always cherish and would recommend it to any student at QUT.

My Glasgow Highlights and Advice

Ashleigh: University of Glasgow, Semester 1, 2016

There are so many things I should put in this section, but my top five highlights (in no particular order) would be going to a beach and hot spa in Reykjavik, Iceland in the middle of Winter, the torchlight procession at Edinburgh’s Hogmanay, New Year’s Eve from Westminster Bridge, spending my birthday looking over Barcelona and taking a sunset cruise in Santorini!

Looking over Barcelona on my Birthday

Looking over Barcelona on my Birthday

Sunset Cruise in Santorini

Sunset Cruise in Santorini

Tips and Advice

Firstly, budget more than you estimate you’ll need as a contingency and have some Australian currency spare in case your wallet goes missing or you need more changed over quickly. Then, be flexible when you travel so you can spend as little as possible while still getting the most out of it. Most importantly, no matter where you go or how much travel you do, don’t get stuck with people you find from back home. Go out, get involved in the culture and meet people from everywhere! This is a piece of advice I was given on my flight over and something which I will always take with me because if you stick with the same people, you’ll probably keep doing the same thing and won’t really experience the culture as much as you could.

New Years Eve in London

New Years Eve in London

Why I chose to study at The University of Hull

When I first arrived at the University of Hull, I was incredibly overwhelmed with my new surroundings. My student accommodation was one that you saw in movies; all the houses on my street were identical. However, once I had unpacked and settled in and met my new housemates I instantly loved it. Starting off as complete strangers, you would not believe how close you become after the semester has finished. It was like a little family was formed. Living in a student house was one of the best choices as I had the opportunity to live and experience a variety of cultures. My roommates were from France, America, Germany and the Ukraine. So you can imagine what the family dinners consisted of.pic 3

I initially chose Hull as I had heard through friends and family that Hull had a reputable business program and a strong exchange relationship with QUT. This partnership assured me that this exchange semester would improve my Business studies and educational development.

Hull itself is small town located in Kingston upon Hull, a city in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is renown for its professional football team and its famous cheesy chips. Although it was only a small town, it gave me the opportunity to become good friends with the locals and create life long friendships. Hull is also conveniently located about an hour away from Leeds, which allowed me to travel to Dublin, Copenhagen and Edinburgh all for around 20 pounds. It was also an overnight ferry trip to Amsterdam, making weekend trips a must. Hull was also extremely affordable. Many items were considerably cheaper than the South, especially the nightlife.

 I didn’t really have an initial budget for my exchange. I decided to go over with the approach of having ‘no regrets’ and knowing that Hull was known for its cheap prices really did help. On average, I would spend approximately 120 pounds a week which including weekly grocery shopping, clubbing nights out, taxis, home cooked family dinners and the occasional recovery meal of cheesy chips.pic 1

I would definitely recommend travelling whilst abroad!! Make the most of your time overseas as it goes incredibly quickly. Make sure you don’t get lazy and too comfortable, keep remembering where you are in the world and travel as much as possible (while still studying and passing, of course). Make the most Ryanair’s 20 pound return flights to Europe. Like everyone says, the world is your oyster and it’s what you make of it. I was lucky enough to travel throughout the June/ July break as the Hull University semester didn’t start till late September. I explored many parts of Europe and honestly had the best 3 months of my life.

Also join a sporting team!! Wednesday nights were by far my favourite night in Hull. It was when each sporting team had ‘circle’, aka socials where socialise with your sporting team and then head over to the nightclub on campus where each team soon partied on. pic 4These socials involved horrendous dress up themes, which changed week to week and also the opportunity to meet other sports teams when there were joint socials. If you manage any spare room in your suitcase, I highly recommend packing some dress up options. These nights were seriously great, nothing better than a blast from the past (S Club 7) and current bangers like J Biebs.

One tip would be definitely packing your favourite Australian foods, snack and chocolates to overcome homesickness. Tim Tams is a must as these can be found in certain shops however for three times the price in Australia and also vegemite. You cannot go wrong with vegemite on toast for breakfast. Necessities like phone, cameras and laptops are also important as it is a great way to stay in contact with everyone back home.

Discovering the University of Essex

I went on exchange to the University of Essex in the second semester of 2015. The University of Essex is situated in Colchester which has claimed to be the oldest town in Britain. Colchester is a relatively small, historic town but is fast-growing. When I first arrived, I was surprised to see how small Colchester is compared to Brisbane as I already thought Brisbane was a small town. It is also home to the Colchester Castle. Colchester is only a 45 minute train ride to London and an 1 hour bus ride to Stamford Airport. This makes it easy to take weekend trips to London. Ryanair , a budget airline mainly flies from Stamford Airport to a majority of the European destinations which is very convenient when travelling during the semester.

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The University

The University of Essex is home to 10,500 students coming from 130 different countries. The nationalities are very diverse so you won’t feel as you are the only foreigner. Many facilities available to the students such as a gym, sports centre, theatre, night club, hairdresser, campus store, banks, restaurants, post office, bars and many more. There is also a market day happening every week where people come onto campus and set up stores selling a variety of things such as sushi, flowers, curry, cake, old record CDs, t-shirts and many more as the stores change every week. There are also two lakes right beside the campus if anyone wanted to enjoy a nice day out on the grass.

Accommodation

The dorms are situated in the campus which makes it very convenient to get to class. It usually only took me 2-5mins to get to class from my dorm depending on where the classroom is. I shared my dorm with 6 other people of the same gender where we get our own bathroom and bedroom but share the kitchen. I chose to stay in the Courts as I appreciate having my own bathroom. The room was quite pleasant where a desk, chair, bed and bedside table is provided. However, you will have to provide your own bedding. There are also heaters in every room, even the bathrooms in the United Kingdom, so there is no need to worry about freezing in winter. The kitchen was supplied with a kettle, rice cooker, fridge and cabinets. You will have to buy your own toaster if you wanted toast and any other cooking utensils. The kitchen are cleaned once a week and garbage are emptied every day. However, it is up to you to clean your bathroom and bedroom. The other option is the Towers where rent is a bit cheaper but you share a dorm with 12 people and have no private toilet. However, it allows you to meet more people and there are parties happening every week at the Towers.

Study

I studied law subjects on exchange which were pretty easy to match with the units back at QUT. The University of Essex has three terms instead of two semesters and give different assessments to the exchange students. I was only required to complete one 100% essays for each subject. pic 2The University of Essex also has less students as compared to QUT, thus their classes are smaller as there is usually only about 30 people enrolled in one subject. For each law subject, I only had a 2 hour lectorial. However, it is required of the students to tap into their class every lesson to mark attendance and failure to attend a certain number of class will require an explanation. I recommend booking transport such as buses, trains and flights in advance as they go up in prices as much as 4x if you book last minute. Also be aware of pickpockets in Europe as they are everywhere and are very creative in the way they try distract and steal your things.

Finance

I budgeted around $15,000 for exchange as I travelled before and after the semester. I also travelled to Asia after leaving Europe. The only way budget way to get around town is taking the bus which is more expensive compared to Brisbane. There is no card system such as the oyster card which is used in London and everyone is required to buy paper tickets when they board the bus. There are also no concession fares. Food is around the same cost depending on where you shop and what you are buying. It is a bit cheaper to shop in Aldi then Tesco but it is a bit inconvenient to get to Aldi in Colchester. There is also a shop called Poundland where everything is one pound. You can find a variety of things from pasta sauce to plates, cups and Halloween costumes so it’s highly recommended to go shop there for essentials before you go to Tesco to buy the rest. I used a Citibank debit card because there is no withdrawal fee. I also had a travel card from Commonwealth for back up but I mainly used my Citibank card.

Overall

Going on exchange has given me a valuable experience which I would not be able to gain otherwise. Being able to live in another country for three months was very valuable as it has made me more independent, mature and grown up in many different ways. There were many issues where I had to make my own decisions and figure out how to solve it. Unexpectedly, my biggest dilemma throughout my exchange is what I should cook for my next meal. I also appreciate the opportunity to travel to many different countries I would recommend anyone to go on exchange as it provides a rare opportunity to live in a different country and gives you a chance to explore and visit different countries before you are stuck in a 9-5 full-time job. I had second thoughts before going due to many different issues but decided to go in the end and had no regrets.