Leeds Survival Guide, Part 2: Leeds Lingo

In the past few months of being in Leeds, there have been plenty of interesting and strange Yorkshire sayings that I’ve encountered. In Australia, we have words such as “snag”, “arvo”, “grog” that are native to the Australian language. Similarly, there are newfound words found in the ‘Yorkshire’ dialect found in places like Leeds, York and Sheffield.

As part of my Leeds Survival Guide, I’m going to share a few crucial and the most interesting words I’ve heard so far.

Most importantly, when you first make eye contact with a Yorkshire person you’ll most likely be greeted with “you alright?”. This happens to mean “how are you?” but if you’re not expecting it, it feels strange being asked if you’re alright by the cashier at a supermarket or a stranger you pass by.

Why yes I am okay… Do I not look okay?!

You are supposed to respond with something like, “yes I’m good, and you?”, but it is definitely something I had to get used to.

Aside from that, the following are some more intriguing things I’ve heard that I thought would be good for an incoming student to wrap their head around:

  • Ey up – Hello?
  • Aye – Yes (Kind of like a pirate with a British accent)
  • Clever clogs – Conceited person
  • Egg on – To urge someone to do something
  • Endways – Forward
  • Fancy dress – Costume (Not in fact nice clothing, but something like a Halloween costume)
  • Jiggered – Exhausted
  • Jock – Food or lunch (similar to the Australian use of ‘tucker’)
  • Lark – Good fun
  • Teem – Pour (e.g. “It’s teeming!” – “It’s pouring rain!”)
  • Us – Me, my or our
  • Usen – Plural of ‘us’ (Kind of like the way some Aussies say ‘youse’ as a plural of ‘you’)

And here are some Yorkshire idioms that are fun to say:

  • As daft as a dormhouse – Not very intelligent
  • As sharp as a Sheffield – Someone who is quick-witted
  • Catch as catch can – Everyone for themselves
  • Where there’s muck there’s brass – Where there’s hard work, there’s money

There are plenty more England ‘easter eggs’ like this to be found and it is most definitely worth it to explore and find them all. To quote a plaque I found in Whitby, I personally really ‘luv it ere’.

Interning in Indonesia

Catherine Johnson, Bachelor of Business

Short-term program: ACICIS – Business Professional Practicum (BPP) 2017, Indonesia

I started my trip excited yet apprehensive about what would await me in Indonesia, as it was my first time in Indonesia also my first time traveling to Asia. I undertook the Business Professional Practicum (BPP), which is a six-week program consisting of a two-week intensive Indonesian language course and business seminars at Atma Jaya University, followed by a four-week internship. The Australian Consortium runs the program for ‘In-Country’ Indonesian Studies (ACICIS) and you receive 12 credit points if you successfully complete the assessment.

When I arrived in Indonesia, I was definitely aware of the cultural difference and I found it exciting, not at all overwhelming. The first main difference I noticed was that the buildings in Jakarta are huge and it is a very busy and chaotic city, however, this is expected since it is a mega-city with a population of 15 million by day and 11 million by night. Because of the enormous population, the traffic did not even come close to Brisbane’s “traffic”. I found an app called Go-Jek – a cheap motorcycle taxi service which was great for when I was in a rush and wanted to weave through the traffic and reach my destination faster!

Go-Jeck Taxis

Something else I noticed about Jakarta is that at all hours of the day, there are locals on the streets, just chatting to each other or having food at a “warung” (street stall). I think it is great that locals can just walk outside and have someone to talk to. I also believe this is one of the reasons the crime and violence rate in Indonesia is so low and why Indonesians are some of the happiest people in the world – there are stats on it!

Another aspect about Jakarta, and Indonesia in general, is that it’s very rare for local Indonesians to come across foreigners, so as a result locals often tried to talk to me or in more touristy areas, I had people come up and ask for photos. However, it was harmless and generally people were just being friendly so it is nothing to be worried about if you consider going to Indonesia.

The field trips were a great part of the program as we were given the chance to visit the Indonesia Stock Exchange (IDX) and Google. These field trips gave me a real insight into Indonesian workplaces and we were able to ask questions and discuss certain topics. For example, what staff at the stock exchange do on a day-to-day basis and what strategies they are implementing to increase foreign investment and foreign listings at the IDX. Similarly, at Google had the opportunity to speak with the Strategic Partner Manager about the work that Google focuses on in Indonesia specifically.

Google Indonesia

Atma Jaya University, where the language course and industry-led seminars are held, is based in Central Jakarta and has 14 000 students. During the two weeks of my studies at Atma Jaya the local students were on holiday so the campus was relatively quiet. The facilities were less modern and the campus was smaller than QUT Gardens Point, despite that, it didn’t fail to impress me as it was clean, in the heart of the city and the students were all very approachable and friendly. The language course was helpful as I learned basic Indonesian to help with catching taxis, ordering and paying for food etc, and the classes only had about 7-10 students each so it accommodated a very interactive learning environment. I also had a lovely student volunteer from Atma Jaya, who was my buddy throughout my time in Indonesia in case I needed help with anything. She helped me set up my SIM card, find accommodation, recommend places to visit and she even went out of her way and took me and a few other Australians around Jakarta for the day. The support of Atma Jaya students was great and made the transition to living in Jakarta much easier than it otherwise would have been.

Atma Jaya University Campus

My Bahasa Indonesia language class at Atma Jaya University

The cost of living in Jakarta is much cheaper than in Brisbane. For example, I was able to get lunch from the canteen at Atma Jaya for 10,000 rupiah which equates to about $1 in Australia. The accommodation was also a lot cheaper, for 1 month in Jakarta it cost the equivalent to 1.5 or 2 weeks rent in Brisbane. The clothes and food that were sold in shopping centres (and there’s a lot of shopping centres in Jakarta!) was slightly cheaper than in Brisbane, but not nearly as cheap compared with eating street food or when buying clothes from a market. Water is very cheap in Indonesia and it is a necessity to buy as the tap water is unsafe to drink.

I managed to go and explore Indonesia on 4 different weekends. Firstly, I went to Bogor which is 60km south of Jakarta. I caught a train with some other Australians and 2 local Atma Jaya students from Jakarta to Bogor so it was a very cheap day-trip. I also went to Yogyakarta one weekend. I had to book a plane ticket to get there but it was definitely worth it as there was lots to do and see. On another weekend, a colleague from the IDX kindly drove me and the other Australian IDX interns to Bandung and showed us around. On my last full day in Indonesia, my IDX colleagues organised for me and the other interns to go white water rafting!

The internship at the Indonesia Stock Exchange would definitely be the highlight of my trip. I interned with 3 other Australians that were undertaking the same program as me and it was always great to have familiar faces around the office. I had a mentor who was very helpful and provided work that related to my accounting degree while also gaining an understanding of different areas of the IDX. It was great to be shown around the IDX facilities, including the IDX TV studio, the library and the main hall where the “opening bell” sounds each day at 9am for when stocks begin trading.

The colleagues within the team I worked were very inclusive and always willing to help with any questions I had. I noticed that food is a big part of the work culture in Indonesia, so there was always new food I’d never eaten before, so that was an added bonus! If you undertake this program you will find that interning in a new workplace, especially a country other than Australia, allows you to appreciate and be aware of the differences in work cultures, therefore become more adaptable and flexible to future jobs.

Prambanan Temple in Yogyakarta

White Water Rafting

First day at the Indonesia Stock Exchange

IDX Incubator

My colleagues during the internship

Last day at the Indonesia Stock Exchange

All in all, I’ve come back to Australia with an incredible appreciation for Indonesia, as well as life-long friends from Australia and Indonesia. My trip to Indonesia exceeded all of my expectations – the amazing people encompassed by the multitude of places to explore made it an enriching and rewarding experience, and is now a country that I will definitely come back to. I highly recommend the ACICIS programs that are offered, especially the Business Professional Practicum, as it provides a unique opportunity to travel abroad with financial support from the New Colombo Plan, meet likeminded people, experience an overseas workplace that aligns with your studies, all while gaining credit points towards your QUT degree.

 

Norwegian Adventure

Kathleen, O. Bachelor of Business

Norwegian Business School (Semester 2, 2017)

Norway? Why did you pick Norway? – Most common question I received after getting my acceptance letter. Next in line was Australia *shocked face* gosh that must have been a long flight, how long did it take? Really long mostly, but it was definitely worth it.

Snow = Building a Snowman

So why did I pick Norway? Well it was as far away from Australia I could think of, I was getting the opportunity of immersing myself into a different culture (but where they still speak English) and I was guaranteed to see snow. I have seen snow before just FYI but come on its snow, who doesn’t like snow?!Well I got to see snow, sadly only for a couple of weeks but I can now say that I lived somewhere it snowed, so I’m happy.

Host Country:

Norway is a beautiful country with its extremely picturesque mountains and fjords. For my exchange in Norway, I was based in the capital city, Oslo. It was a bit of an adjustment for me because while it’s the capital city, Norway does only have a population of 5.3 million so Oslo wasn’t really a big city.

Christmas markets

It may be a small city but its big at heart, there is always something going on in the city.

 

Like most European countries, transportation in Oslo was great and easy to use, I love ferries and one of my highlights during my stay in Oslo was catching a ferry to the Islands on the fjord, have a picnic, watch the sunset and see some natural wildlife – I was followed around the island by a couple of foxes, so cute. The downside to Oslo and Norway is that the cost of living is high, so be prepared to come home broke like I did. The transportation card for 30 days costs about 70 AUD, rent (I was staying at the student dorms run by the university) including electricity will set you back somewhere around the 600-700AUD a month. I would recommend the student dorms though, because they mostly come fully furnished so you don’t have to buy much.

Host University:

Studying at BI is a bit different to QUT there is a lot more emphasis on independent study. You still have the standard 3-hour contact hours, but instead of a lecture and tutorial, it’s just a 3-hour lecture. Also at least for me my final grade was 100% made of by my final exam or term paper. Which was a bit daunting and I found that it made studying at BI a lot harder than at QUT, as there was no way to assess how I was

Bergen

actually doing with the course content and if I needed to put more study time in. Thankfully, to pass you only require 30%, which was lucky for me as I spend more time travelling then studying.

 

One of the things I really liked abut studying at BI was the events they run throughout the semester focused but not exclusively towards international and exchange students. So there was free weekly coffee days, hiking and activity trips, and free food. Once a month (ish) BI runs a free food night, usually themed, called BI-nner. You have to get in fast though because everyone likes a free feed and tickets sell out in minutes. The University of Oslo also holds free movie nights once a fortnight, in their lecture halls. Its just a 10min train ride to the University from BI, so as ways to save money but hang out with your new found friends, this is a must.

Travel:

While I was living in Norway, I spend some time travelling Norway. I went to Bergen via the train – the worlds best scenic train ride apparently – and they are not wrong.

Northern Lights

Plus side too is that train is a lot cheaper than flying in Norway, downside it takes nearly 3 times as long to get where you are going. I also went to Tromso, saw the northern lights and went dog sledding. As recommendations go, Tromso or the Loften Islands is a must do if you are ever in Norway. I also got to travel around Europe. I went to Amsterdam with the International Student Society at BI. One of my friends and I also spent the weekend in Budapest – such a beautiful city and really cheap. We also spend a week in London after our exams had finished.

View from Buda Castle

We saw the Lion King and Aladdin, saw the sunset over London from the eye and shopped, shopped until our hearts were content.

I could go on about all the amazing things I did and saw while on my exchange but I would be here for ages. So my parting gift – seriously go on an exchange, I can’t recommend it enough! It is worth every dollar of my spend pennies.

Oh Candaaaa!

Rosanna, E. Bachelor of Business and Creative Industries

Ryerson University (Semester 1, 2017)

I experienced my exchange in Toronto, Canada and endured the frigid winter that it put on display. This was the first challenge I faced; the lead up to my exchange was so swift and overwhelmingly busy at times, that I had forgotten to prepare myself for -20 degree days, not including wind chill. I quickly discovered that I am a Queenslander at heart, I became a sun-worshiper and tested my room-mate’s patience with me as I constantly pointed out how cold it was and refused to go outside if it wasn’t a necessity.

Me playing in snow for the first time

I resided in a co-op building which was recommended to all the exchange students who were attending Ryerson University. This was great as it meant practically everyone who was involved in the program also lived, ate and drank together daily. My room-mates quickly became my closest friends which I cherished when battling my homesickness. This was another thing that shocked me and something I really didn’t think I would experience! I hopelessly missed the clear blue skies of Brisbane and the constant stream of vitamin D from the sun; it’s safe to say that I truly experienced Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)! EVERYTHING changed for me though on my mid-semester break, where my French room-mate and I took a spontaneous trip to Mexico. The trip healed my longing for sun while simultaneously changing my perspective on my not-yet enjoyed experience. People who go on exchange do-so for a reason; whether that may be to experience new things, for personal growth, to travel while studying or to drink your way through classes and scrape by with a satisfactory grade. For me, acknowledging that I was homesick and deciding to accept that and embrace the opportunity that I had worked so hard to give myself was the best decision I made.

The Toronto sky line from Toronto Island

I began to embrace the snow and the ice glazed streets and the fact that I could never feel my hands or feet. More importantly though, I embraced the people I was meeting and opened to the idea that my friends back home didn’t have to be my only friends. My greatest joy that the exchange program brought me were the friendships I found. People on exchange generally have this mentality and openness to life that I loved. Everyone is there with the assumption socialising is a priority, thus people had a zest for life and new experiences. It was refreshing and an opportunity to break away from the predispositions I felt held me back in Brisbane and an opportunity for me to become more confident in myself. Exchange gave me the time away from home that gave me the opportunity to be truly isolated from the friends and family that have surrounded me my whole life. I could experience who I was and what I wanted without those external influences and it felt quite liberating!

The Washington sister Women’s March in Toronto

I now have a new fondness and appreciation for home and the people there while also having a lust and excitement for travelling to unfamiliar places. The exchange program created a catalyst for me to be confident in myself and my passions and has enabled me to have a zestiness for life to carry out and achieve big blinding goals that I would never have thought I could achieve before leaving home! I’m very grateful that I took advantage of the opportunity and have signed up for a study tour in Peru at the end of this year to further my personal growth!