Explore Nearmap

Do you want to see what your house and suburb looked like 10 years ago?

Would you like to put in solar power but are not sure how much electricity you would generate?

Nearmap is a database of high quality aerial photomaps of Australian cities over time. It is highly relevant for Landscape Architecture, Architecture, Civil Engineering and Urban Design. It may also be useful where a visual representation of census data over the map is desired.

Things you can do with Nearmap:

  • Track development of an area over time
  • Calculate solar energy production
  • Observe patterns of shade
  • Measure and mark out boundaries
  • Estimate the volume of pits, mounds and excavations in truckloads or cubic meters
  • See the elevation of bare earth and the actual surface, and details of slope between two points
  • View flood levels

Data layers:

  • Health including adult distress, childhood development, life expectancy
  • Law enforcement by types of crime
  • Property approvals, noise and value
  • Economics including business size, mortgage, income and rent values, and SEIFA relative social disadvantage
  • Environmental land use
  • Nearby schools
  • Demographics including country of birth, household size, age, age by gender, and population size

An example of Nearmap use…

  • Police Search and Rescue use Nearmap to find individuals and evidence. Using Nearmap to look at elevation and slope, the search team can calculate how fast people (children vs adults vs the elderly) will move, including factoring in tiredness over time. This allows the search area to be plotted for maximum efficiency.

Access Nearmap via QUT Library’s Databases and specialised search tools. You can then select a relevant study area or view all databases to find the Nearmap link.

Find out more at http://libguides.library.qut.edu.au/databases/nearmap

New look Quick Find!

The new look Quick Find on the Library website can now be personalised just for you. Alongside your favourite features, you’ll find the following new functionality:

  • Permanently save your favourite items and search history to My Favourites.
  • Easily filter search results to show only online material or use the ‘Available in hardcopy’ filter to show only physical items.
  • Search for your unit code and find a link to your QUT Readings list.
  • Find more links to related articles in search results for peer-reviewed articles, like those on a similar topic, articles from the reference list or articles that have cited the paper.
  • Use the new browse items search to easily find your textbook or find books by a certain author.
  • Easily check if the Library has access to a specific journal using the new ‘Find a journal’ search.
  • Request scans of print journals and chapters of books held in the Library from within search results.
  • See your current loans and requests displayed in a more user-friendly way in the new-look ‘My loans and holds’, making it easy to check current loans, view hold and scan requests, or see any Library messages.
  • Automatic renewal of items on loan the end of the loan period (up to five times, unless recalled).

Visit QUT Library’s website for information about the new Quick Find search.

We’d love to know what you think about the new Quick Find, let us know your feedback or suggestions

 

Patents Search – Tracking Innovation

Want to discover the latest breakthroughs of applied researchers in your field? Looking for practical solutions to real-world problems? Interested in device design drawings and detailed specifications?

You should search for patents that have been granted to inventors.  Need to know where to begin your patent search? Consult our library subject guide on patent searching. http://libguides.library.qut.edu.au/patents

Scientists, engineers and technologists often find their search of databases that index and contain the conventional, peer-reviewed literature fails to yield detail on cutting-edge innovation. They understand that to gain a more complete understanding of the state-of-the-art they need to expand their literature discovery by searching for registered patents.

What is a Patent?

A patent is a right granted to the inventor for a device, substance, method or process that is new when compared with what is already known. A patent protects new inventions and covers how things work, what they do, how they do it, what they are made of and how they are made. It gives the owner the right to prevent others from making, using, importing or selling the invention without permission. Patents are often granted for small, incremental improvements to a known technology. A patent is legally enforceable. It gives the inventor exclusive right to commercially exploit her / his invention for the life of the patent.

Patent Search for Beginners

Google Scholar search will include patents in your search results (by default). There is also a specialist Google Patents search interface. All the major patents offices have their own search engine and discovery platform.

When an invention or device is truly new, there is no established or agreed terminology to describe it. The inventor (usually via their attorney or agent) also have a vested interest in making their patent difficult to discover. Accordingly, you should also search for patents by class.

Patent Classification

Patent examiners typically classify an inventor’s application for a grant of patent into several classes, depending on that invention’s components and functions. Classification brings together similar devices and concepts, even when different terms have been used to describe the invention.

Classification systems provide a language independent search tool, one that embraces all domains of technology:

  • Patent classes are well-defined and scoped;
  • Patent classes are arranged in an ordered and logical fashion;
  • Patent classes are hierarchical. Classes are deconstructed into detailed sub-classes.

To conduct a thorough and comprehensive patent search you should search by class.

Learn More — Delve Deeper

QUT Library has a subject guide to help you navigate the patent process and that shows you how to discover patents.

Finding Information #2 – Searching PubMed

PubMed is a freely available version of the U.S. National Library of Medicine’s MEDLINE database and also provides access to some additional content not selected for MEDLINE. PubMed doesn’t contain full-text articles, but may link to publishers’ websites and other resources

Access PubMed via QUT Library’s Databases and specialised search tools. You can then select Health or view all databases to find the PubMed link. When you connect to PubMed, using your QUT login details, and search for information a QUT Fulltext Finder link may appear. This allows you to check if a fulltext copy of an article is available via QUT Library.

Simple steps for searching PubMed:

  1. Identify your search terms for each of your main concepts
  2. Perform a simple search by entering terms in the PubMed search box
  3. Include terms from the controlled vocabulary MeSH (Medical Subject Headings)
  4. Use the advanced search to see your search history and combine searches
  5. Apply limits to your search results using the filters sidebar

PubMed uses Automatic Term Mapping which automatically searches for phrases and MeSH terms. Check for successful mapping to MeSH terms by viewing the “Search details” box on your Search results page.

For more help searching PubMed, check out the comprehensive online PubMed Tutorial.

O Week – What’s happening in the library?

Welcome!

QUT Library offers a range of orientation activities to help you prepare for Semester 2, whether you are new to QUT or returning for another semester.

Library Tours

This tour is much more than a walk around a building because QUT Library is so much more than just a building! Your Library has study spaces, services, resources and people to help you, both at your campus and online. During O Week, library tours are held on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday at Gardens Point and Kelvin Grove. Tours depart from HiQ at:

  • 10am
  • 11am
  • 12pm
  • 1pm
  • 2pm

Referencing made simple

Referencing is an important skill that you must use at uni. This session introduces you to the principles and styles of referencing and citing using QUT cite|write. It also explains how you can paraphrase the work of others, avoid plagiarism, and make sure that your work has academic integrity.

Researching made easy

It’s easy to find information but getting the best scholarly information quickly is a skill. After this session, you will use databases more efficiently to find relevant information and current journal articles for your assignments.

Kelvin Grove Library

We look forward to welcoming you to QUT Library for Semester 2 and if you need help please contact us.

For more information about O Week, check out QUT orientation for students

Search tips: Wildcards, Truncation, and Boolean – What do they all mean?

You may be aware of the simple search strategy we librarians like to call Boolean. It’s a form of database logic which can help connect your keywords together when you search in a database.

The three basic Boolean operators are AND, OR, and NOT and you can use these to broaden or narrow your search.

For example:

Puppies AND kittens – results containing those two keywords

Puppies OR kittens – broadens results

(Puppies AND kittens) NOT dogs – narrows results

There are extra tools you can use to help refine your search strategy, these are called wildcards and truncation.

Truncation help by broadening your keyword search by attaching to the root of a word, this is usually done by adding an asterisk to the end of the root of a word.

For example:

Child* = children, children’s, child’s, childhood

Wildcards are useful when multiple spellings of a word can affect your search. Remember, the symbol of the wildcard may change depending on which database you use.

For example:

coloni?e = colonise, colonize

 Wom!n = woman, women

If you want to read further about this, take a look at one of our resources to help you Think Like a Computer and bring your research to the next level.