International Human Rights Day

On Monday 10 December we celebrate International Human Rights Day.  While it will be celebrated in different ways by different people, the message around the world is the same.

This year the Universal Declaration of Human Rights turns 70.  The document, which proclaimed the inalienable right to which all human beings are entitled — regardless of race, colour, religion, sex, language, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status, is the most translated in the world.

A really lovely representation of these principals, and a great way to share them with a younger audience is the illustrated edition of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.  It’s published by the United Nations in Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian, and Spanish.

QUT is heavily involved in research into the area of human rights. Here’s some of our most recently published works about the current challenges and issues in the area — available in QUT’s ePrints repository.

O’Brien, Erin (2019) Challenging the Human Trafficking Narrative: Victims, Villains, and Heroes. 

Kauli, Jackie & Thomas, Verena (2018) Communicating the law: A participatory communication toolkit for human rights defenders in Papua New Guinea. 

Huggins, Anna & Lewis, Bridget (2018) The Paris Agreement: Development, the North-South divide and human rights. 

 

 

 

 

Wikipedia Editing Workshop

17 years ago, Jimmy Wales and Larry Sanger started Wikipedia and today, it’s one of the most popular websites in the world. It’s visited on average over 41 billion times a month! (Wikimedia Statistics 2018).

Are you one of those 41 billion visitors? Have you read something on Wikipedia and thought, ‘That’s not right! Someone should fix that’. You can be the one to ‘fix that’ and set the world right – learn how by attending a QUT Library Wikipedia Editing Workshop.

It’s a great opportunity for academics, HDR students and Research Support staff to engage with your research area using Wikipedia. In the workshop, you’ll practice writing for a general audience and contribute to Wikipedia by checking, verifying or adding information in your area of research or interest.

Join Wikipedia and make a profile before arriving, then put your editing skills into practice when you get here.

It’ll be held in QUT Library in conjunction with State Library of Queensland’s #QWiki Club.

3 September 12-1.30pm

QUT Kelvin Grove Campus, R306

image of a man and woman looking at an underwater seascape in the background. Overlaid with text about the wikipedia editing workshop

Book in to the Wikipedia Editing Workshop

Explore Nearmap

Do you want to see what your house and suburb looked like 10 years ago?

Would you like to put in solar power but are not sure how much electricity you would generate?

Nearmap is a database of high quality aerial photomaps of Australian cities over time. It is highly relevant for Landscape Architecture, Architecture, Civil Engineering and Urban Design. It may also be useful where a visual representation of census data over the map is desired.

Things you can do with Nearmap:

  • Track development of an area over time
  • Calculate solar energy production
  • Observe patterns of shade
  • Measure and mark out boundaries
  • Estimate the volume of pits, mounds and excavations in truckloads or cubic meters
  • See the elevation of bare earth and the actual surface, and details of slope between two points
  • View flood levels

Data layers:

  • Health including adult distress, childhood development, life expectancy
  • Law enforcement by types of crime
  • Property approvals, noise and value
  • Economics including business size, mortgage, income and rent values, and SEIFA relative social disadvantage
  • Environmental land use
  • Nearby schools
  • Demographics including country of birth, household size, age, age by gender, and population size

An example of Nearmap use…

  • Police Search and Rescue use Nearmap to find individuals and evidence. Using Nearmap to look at elevation and slope, the search team can calculate how fast people (children vs adults vs the elderly) will move, including factoring in tiredness over time. This allows the search area to be plotted for maximum efficiency.

Access Nearmap via QUT Library’s Databases and specialised search tools. You can then select a relevant study area or view all databases to find the Nearmap link.

Find out more at http://libguides.library.qut.edu.au/databases/nearmap

Love Data Week Guest blogger: Barriers to open data sharing

The 2014 Ebola outbreak mobilized groups of researchers across the world to sequence viral genomes and share data providing information crucial to “designing effective diagnostics, vaccines and antibody-based therapies” [1].  However uncertainties around ownership of data, intellectual property rights, patient consent and poor management of data all make access to the source of truth very difficult and often essential data is not available to research community working on epidemics.    QUT PhD candidate Anisa Rowhani-Farid, from the School of Public Health and Social Work, discusses some of these barriers to open data sharing in her guest blog today. 

[1]    Yozwiak, N. L., Schaffner, S. F., Sabeti, P. C.: Data sharing: Make outbreak research open access. Nature, 2015, 518:477–479, doi:10.1038/518477a

My desire to pursue research in this field began when I was a junior bench scientist some 10 years ago, conducting anti-malarial drug research. I was confronted with the commercial aspect of scientific research.  I learned about the institutional arrangements between industry, academia, the community, or “consumers”.  I also learned about how intellectual property, patents, and funding arrangements play a critical yet limiting role in contributing to the advancement of scientific knowledge.

Anisa Rowhani-Farid

PhD Candidate Anisa Rowhani-Farid

It became clear to me that scientific research is driven and, more often than not, pressured by the funding available from government and industry, and that these relationships are primarily based on the conception that scientific knowledge is generated through research that views knowledge as a commodity, distributed at a cost to other researchers and most importantly, populations that might need open access to that knowledge.

As I read more, I wondered what happened to all the public money that was spent on health and medical research. I read Chalmers and Glasziou’s (2009) paper on research waste, as well as the series that was published in the Lancet in 2014 called ‘Research: increasing value, reducing waste’.  I learned that around 85% of the world’s spending on health and medical research is wasted per year, and a contributing factor was that the findings of medical studies cannot be reproduced by other researchers and so seemingly successful medical breakthroughs are thus unverifiable [1, 2]. This reproducibility crisis in health and medical research made me think of the way in which scientific knowledge progresses.  I was fascinated by the paper written by John Ioannidis in 2005 where he concluded through simulations that most published findings in the scientific discourse are false and misleading [3, 4].

If most of what is claimed in the scientific literature is false, and if scientists are adopting malpractices because of the pressure to commercialise so-called ‘medical breakthroughs’, then how deep will the cultural change have to be for scientists to conduct high-quality research with integrity, and share all their findings, positive or negative? This question has motivated my doctorate of philosophy.

  1. Chalmers I, Glasziou P: Avoidable waste in the production and reporting of research evidence. The Lancet 2009, 374(9683):86-89.
  2. Chalmers I, Bracken M, Djulbegovic B, Garattini S, Grant J, Gülmezoglu M, Howells D, Ioannidis J, Oliver S: How to increase value and reduce waste when research priorities are set. The Lancet 2014, 383(9912):156-165.
  3. Ioannidis J: How to Make More Published Research True. PLoS Med 2014, 11(10):e1001747.
  4. Ioannidis JPA: Why Most Published Research Findings Are False. PLOS Medicine 2005, 2(8):e124.

Watch this video (YouTube 2m8s) from Anisa Rowhani-Farid and follow her @AnisaFarid on Twitter.

Anisa Rowhani-Farid (YouTube video, 2m8s)If you’re a researcher, we’d love to hear from you.  Leave a comment below on your data story.

Visit the Love Data Week blog each day for stories, resources and activities and if you would like to join the conversation via Twitter #lovedata18 #qutlibrary

 

Love Data Week 2018

It’s Love Data Week!

From the 12th to the 16th of February, along with other academic and research libraries, data archives and organisations, QUT Library is celebrating the value and importance of research data, which we believe are the foundation of the scholarly record and crucial for advancing our knowledge of the world around us.

The theme for the 2018 social media event is ‘data stories’ including :

Stories about data
Telling stories with data
Connected conversations
We are data

Anisa Rowhani-Farid, from the School of Public Health and Social Work, Faculty of Health who’s completing a PhD Towards a culture of open science and data sharing in health and medical research at QUT has this to say about data and reproducible science:

Efforts are underway by the global meta-research community to strengthen the reliability of the scientific method [1].  Data sharing is an indispensable part of the movement towards science that is open; where scientific truth is not a questionable commodity, but is easily accessible, replicable, and verifiable [2].  The cultural shift towards reproducible science is complex and it calls for a twofold change in the attitudes of individual researchers toward reproducibility, and the leadership provided by the systems and services that support scientific research.  As such, journals, universities, government bodies, and funders are key players in promoting this culture.  Transparency and reproducibility are elements central to strengthening the scientific method, and data provides the key to scientific truth [3].”

 

  1. Ioannidis JPA, Fanelli D, Dunne DD, Goodman SN: Meta-research: Evaluation and Improvement of Research Methods and Practices. PLoS Biol 2015, 13(10):e1002264.
  2. Reproducibility and reliability of biomedical research: improving research practice. In.: The Academy of Medical Sciences; 2015.
  3. Iqbal SA, Wallach JD, Khoury MJ, Schully SD, Ioannidis JPA: Reproducible Research Practices and Transparency across the Biomedical Literature. PLoS Biol 2016, 14(1):e1002333.

If you’re a researcher, leave a comment below on your data story.

Visit the Love Data Week blog each day for stories, resources and activities and if you would like to join the conversation via Twitter #lovedata18  @qutlibrary

Key technology tools for your IT Business Research

10 years ago when the iPhone was launched, the era of smartphones were just dawning. In 2005 most people received their news via radio, TV or Blackberries. Today most of us look first to our smart phones for information and if our phone is not to hand, we are at a loss and wonder what is going on in the world.

Those who analyse business trends love the Wayne Gretzky (Ice Hockey player) quote and Steve Jobs, at the end of the original iPhone launch couldn’t resist either: “Skate to where the puck is going to be, not where it has been”.

Indeed the holy grail of business analysis is predicting the path innovation will take and the speed at which it will move.

Sometimes it is a case of blink and technology overtakes you. (Just ask Nokia 🙂 )

So how to obtain a bleeding edge insight into today’s technology to predict future innovation trends?

Gartner has tools to frame information into visually concise evidence of current market conditions and future directions.

Gartner’s hype cycles graphically display the lifecycle of a technology and provides reference points as to where each company is located within that lifecycle.Use hype cycles to remove the hysteria of a technology’s popular value and instead discover its true commercial potential.

Gartner’s Magic Quadrants are visualization tools based on research, which positions companies within their market place and aligns them with their competitors.

Use Magic Quadrants to get quickly educated about a market’s technology providers, their competitive positioning and the strategies they are using to via for end-user business.

For more help contact HiQ

 

Christmas Break & the Library

Christmas and New Year are just around the corner. From the 23rd December until the 1st of January QUT Library is having a Christmas break and will be closed. But even though our libraries at Caboolture, Kelvin Grove and Gardens Point will be closed during this time you can still access many library resources online.

If you need to do some research, jump on the Library’s Website and search through Quickfind. Or search a database for your subject area by selecting looking under Databases and specialised search tools.

Not sure how to find the information you need? Have a look at our handy how to find guides to find the right database or website for your research.  You can also find online videos to watch at home and see what eBooks you can read right from the comfort of your home or at the beach!

And if you need further assistance, HiQ’s Contact Center will be available at the following times –

23 December – 31 December open 10am – 2pm

This excludes 25 & 26 December and the 1st January Public Holidays when HiQ are closed.

HiQ Service Points at Kelvin Grove Library & Gardens Point Library will be back in action on the 2nd January. Until then, from all of QUT Library, we hope you have a safe and happy holiday!

Winners of the SAGE Higher Degree Research Student Publication Prize Announced

A paper on the topography of the dragonfly wing has taken out first place in the SAGE Higher Degree Research Student Publication Prize. Chaturanga Bandara was awarded first prize and $1500 for his article, Bactericidal Effects of Natural Nanotopography of Dragonfly Wing on Escherichia coli, published in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

(L to R: Onur Bas, Chaturanga Bandara, Anna Worthy)

The SAGE Higher Degree Research Student Publication Prize was awarded to a Higher Degree Research (HDR) student, who was the lead author on a paper published in a peer reviewed journal with a Q1 or Q2 ranking in Scimago. A panel of six judges, three academics and three librarians, evaluated the submissions on originality and readability (writing style and clarity). QUT Library Research Support Manager, Stephanie Bradbury, said that the calibre of entrants to the competition was extremely impressive, and that Chaturanga was the unanimous choice of the judging panel. Second place and $900 was awarded to Onur Bas for his paper, An Integrated Design, Material, and Fabrication Platform for Engineering Biomechanically and Biologically Functional Soft Tissues. Anna Worthy was awarded third place and received $500 for her paper, Atomic resolution of structural changes in elastic crystals of copper(II) acetylacetonate, published in Nature Chemistry.

The awards were presented to the winners on Monday 11 December by Scholarly Communications Librarian, Paula Callan. QUT Library would like to thank SAGE for sponsoring the Higher Degree Research Student Publication Prize.

 

 

 

Patents Search – Tracking Innovation

Want to discover the latest breakthroughs of applied researchers in your field? Looking for practical solutions to real-world problems? Interested in device design drawings and detailed specifications?

You should search for patents that have been granted to inventors.  Need to know where to begin your patent search? Consult our library subject guide on patent searching. http://libguides.library.qut.edu.au/patents

Scientists, engineers and technologists often find their search of databases that index and contain the conventional, peer-reviewed literature fails to yield detail on cutting-edge innovation. They understand that to gain a more complete understanding of the state-of-the-art they need to expand their literature discovery by searching for registered patents.

What is a Patent?

A patent is a right granted to the inventor for a device, substance, method or process that is new when compared with what is already known. A patent protects new inventions and covers how things work, what they do, how they do it, what they are made of and how they are made. It gives the owner the right to prevent others from making, using, importing or selling the invention without permission. Patents are often granted for small, incremental improvements to a known technology. A patent is legally enforceable. It gives the inventor exclusive right to commercially exploit her / his invention for the life of the patent.

Patent Search for Beginners

Google Scholar search will include patents in your search results (by default). There is also a specialist Google Patents search interface. All the major patents offices have their own search engine and discovery platform.

When an invention or device is truly new, there is no established or agreed terminology to describe it. The inventor (usually via their attorney or agent) also have a vested interest in making their patent difficult to discover. Accordingly, you should also search for patents by class.

Patent Classification

Patent examiners typically classify an inventor’s application for a grant of patent into several classes, depending on that invention’s components and functions. Classification brings together similar devices and concepts, even when different terms have been used to describe the invention.

Classification systems provide a language independent search tool, one that embraces all domains of technology:

  • Patent classes are well-defined and scoped;
  • Patent classes are arranged in an ordered and logical fashion;
  • Patent classes are hierarchical. Classes are deconstructed into detailed sub-classes.

To conduct a thorough and comprehensive patent search you should search by class.

Learn More — Delve Deeper

QUT Library has a subject guide to help you navigate the patent process and that shows you how to discover patents.

Finding Information #2 – Searching PubMed

PubMed is a freely available version of the U.S. National Library of Medicine’s MEDLINE database and also provides access to some additional content not selected for MEDLINE. PubMed doesn’t contain full-text articles, but may link to publishers’ websites and other resources

Access PubMed via QUT Library’s Databases and specialised search tools. You can then select Health or view all databases to find the PubMed link. When you connect to PubMed, using your QUT login details, and search for information a QUT Fulltext Finder link may appear. This allows you to check if a fulltext copy of an article is available via QUT Library.

Simple steps for searching PubMed:

  1. Identify your search terms for each of your main concepts
  2. Perform a simple search by entering terms in the PubMed search box
  3. Include terms from the controlled vocabulary MeSH (Medical Subject Headings)
  4. Use the advanced search to see your search history and combine searches
  5. Apply limits to your search results using the filters sidebar

PubMed uses Automatic Term Mapping which automatically searches for phrases and MeSH terms. Check for successful mapping to MeSH terms by viewing the “Search details” box on your Search results page.

For more help searching PubMed, check out the comprehensive online PubMed Tutorial.