Open science, open data – the World Science Festival Brisbane

“It’s not enough to do it; it must be communicated” – Virginia Barbour, Executive Director, Australasian Open Access Strategy Group, on a key concept in science.

Providing open access to research, including publications, data, software, methodologies and all other research outputs, is a growing worldwide initiative, as is the drive to solve real-world problems and stimulate innovation.  The lack of access to research publications and their accompanying data is inhibiting national and international collaboration, public debate and research, however, times are changing.

Originally applied only to data, the F.A.I.R. principles now apply to all research outputs, as proposed at a November 2016 meeting of the G20 Science, Technology and Innovation Ministers Meeting.  Research findings that are F.A.I.R. are Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable.

“With F.A.I.R. access, Australian research will be more visible, the broader community will have better access to well-founded knowledge, Australian researchers will be able to more easily collaborate locally and globally, including with industry, and the Australian research enterprise will be more accountable to the community it serves” – F.A.I.R. Access Working Group

Dr Salvatore Mele from the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) reports that research in the field of physics has always been openly available, with researchers posting each other hard copies of publications that were submitted for review.  During the World Science Festival, which is being held in Brisbane from 22-26 March, the world-renowned Large Hadron Collider will be on display at the Queensland Museum.

Managed by CERN, the data collected from use of the Collider are published in the CERN Open Data Portal, and are accompanied by the software and documentation required to make sense of the data being shared.  Here at QUT, researchers can publish their data and accompanying material through our data repository, Research Data Finder.  We’re doing our bit to accelerate open science by providing access to open data!

Take a look at datasets that have already been added, including ‘Fusion transcripts in prostate cancer using RNA sequences derived from Australian and Chinese men’ by Dr Jyotsna Batra and Dr John Lai, and perhaps add one of your own at QUT Research Data Finder.

NEW: Sage Research Methods Video: Now on trial until May 5th

SAGE Research Methods Video has over 480 videos, including hours of tutorials, expert interviews, video case studies and mini-documentaries covering the entire research process.

Instead of reading about it, see research design and method in action! Search by type of method, professional discipline, or video type. Videos will help to bring methods to life. Stimulate class discussions by assigning videos for pre-class viewing, or use a clip in class to provide an alternative viewpoint. Videos can also be embedded into course management systems for exam preparation. Whether you are learning, doing, supervising or teaching. Students, academics and professionals can find extra help and support, to guide them through every step of their research project, or to succeed in their research methods course.

Is this something you wish to have in our collection or have a say on? Please review the resources and provide feedback here. For questions, please contact your Liaison librarian.

Who has been talking about your research? Altmetric Explorer knows.


Navigate the brave new world of alternative metrics (altmetrics) with Altmetric Explorer.

While traditional, citation-based metrics can take a significant amount of time to indicate the impact of research, altmetrics, that measure online attention, can give researchers a real-time indication of who is taking an interest in their research.

QUT researchers can now see who is talking about their research, and where.  Altmetric Explorer aggregates mentions of their works in a number of sources, including news outlets, blogs, policy documents, social media and Wikipedia, to calculate an ‘Attention Score’.  This is represented by a multi-coloured ‘doughnut’, where each colour corresponds to a type of source; the more colourful the doughnut the wider the reach.

You can use Altmetric Explorer to explore QUT’s publication data, or all research in the Altmetric database. Search by article title, keyword, researcher name, QUT faculty or school.  Currently, Altmetric Explorer only tracks QUT articles with Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs).  Register for an account in Altmetrics Explorer to access extra features.  So get ready to explore Altmetric Explorer and find out the colour of your ‘doughnut’. If you have any questions please contact your Liaison Librarian or Library Research Support.

Get your Research on at ResBaz!

Kickstart your research in 2017 with the Research Bazaar (ResBaz). It is on in Brisbane again this year and is hosted by The University of Queensland. ResBaz is an international festival celebrating digital literacies that are the foundation of modern research. It facilitates collaboration between early career researchers, PhD students, and researchers at other stages of their career using the next generation of digital research tools. You can learn from peers about the digital skills needed for cutting edge research in the 21st century!

There are several events happening in Brisbane throughout ResBaz including a Festival Day and a variety of workshops. Some of the information shared will be about OpenRefine and Web scrapers, bioinformatics as well as some Software Carpentry lessons.

For those able to get to Brisbane the details are as follows –

Where: University of Queensland, St Lucia campus (Advanced Engineering Building)

When: 7-9 February, 2017.

What: ResBaz includes several events and workshops. Registration for the market day is available and recommended. Registration for the workshops is essential.

For those who can’t to get to Brisbane, don’t worry! ResBaz is an international event and hosted in other locations around the globe so you can find a ResBaz location near you.

Can’t make it toResBaz? No worries, QUT Library offers research support to students. Check out QUT Library’s resources for researchers and the training and assistance we offer to all Higher Degree Research Students, other researchers and research support staff.

International Data Week

data

From 11th – 17th September, it is International Data Week. The theme for International Data Week is about mobilising the data revolution, exploring how to improve our knowledge and benefit society through data driven research and innovation.

While data scientists, researchers, entrepreneurs and industry leaders from across the globe gather at Denver, Colorado for the international conference, events closer to home are being held for researchers and those interested in what’s behind research data, such as managing research data, sharing and publishing research data.

Higher degree research students and new QUT researchers are encouraged to attend research skills workshops. Workshop details on the research support calendar.

QUT, together with the State Library of Queensland and ANDS (Australian National Data Service), will also host Sprint to the Finish for 23 (research data) Things. This event is an opportunity for those completing 23 (research data) Things to share what has been learned. The Sprint will also include a tour of The Cube, one of the world’s largest digital interactive learning and display spaces dedicated to providing an inspiring, explorative and participatory experience of QUT’s Science and Engineering research.

Sprint to the Finish is open to anyone, however you will need to complete at least Things 1-5 of the course. Register for this event on Eventbrite.

Reference management in the cloud with Paperpile

Paperpile is an easy to use web-based reference and document management system with secure Google sign-in that allows you to collect, organise and cite your references and documents and share them with collaborators.

Paperpile offers 15GB of free storage and import options from all major databases and other product libraries (including EndNote and Mendeley). The web-based system allows you to access your library on different computers and mobile devices without the need to download software.

As a QUT researcher you have free access to QUT’s Paperpile site licence and can find more information on our website about installing Paperpile.

 

Sharing research data

Are you a QUT researcher? Make your datasets available, discoverable and accessible with Research Data Finder

Are you a QUT researcher? Make your datasets available, discoverable and accessible with Research Data Finder

QUT researchers can now make their datasets openly available, discoverable and accessible using QUT’s Research Data Finder. Researchers can easily self-deposit datasets, quickly describe and publicly share them with the broader research community, maximising opportunities for data re-use and ensuring compliance with funders and publishers.

Two examples where researchers have shared their dataset are below.  There is a link to the dataset at the top right corner in the Access the Data section.

Why share data?

Both the ARC and NHMRC encourage the dissemination of research data (Section C of ARC Discovery grants instructions to applicants).  The Australian Code for the Responsible Conduct of Research states: “Researchers have a responsibility to their colleagues and the wider community to disseminate a full account of their research as broadly as possible.” [Section 4.4]

Public Library of Science (PLOS) and Nature journals require authors to make all data underlying the findings described in manuscripts fully available without restriction, with rare exception.

QUT’s Management of research data policy (MOPP D/2.8.7) advises that QUT ‘research data will be made available for access and re-use by other researchers subject to any contractual, ethical, privacy or confidentiality matters’.  The Guidelines for the Management of Research Data at QUT provide further details on all aspects of research data management including  access and re-use, access agreements, and a range of licences (copyright and Creative Commons).

Other benefits of sharing research datasets in Research Data Finder are:

  • An increase in citations by up to 69% (Piwowar & Vision, 2013)
  • Data is readily available for re-use when required
  • An improved research profile
  • Increased national and international opportunities for collaboration and innovation

Contact your Liaison Librarian for more information about depositing datasets into Research Data Finder

Share QUT research at the click of a button

Have you read an interesting article in QUT ePrints, and been keen to share it with the world?  Or, have you deposited an article in QUT ePrints and want to make it as visible as possible?

Share buttons on QUT eprints

Now it’s easy to share QUT research!

All items in QUT ePrints now have sharing buttons, making it really simple to share an article with your Facebook friends or Twitter followers.  You can share QUT ePrints across two hundred platforms, including:

  • Reddit
  • Google
  • LinkedIn
  • Delicious
  • WordPress

Look for the share buttons next time you visit QUT ePrints.

 

Be prepared: Getting the best out of Study Solutions!

" Day133: Flickr keeps you studying!" By Abdulrahman AlZe3bi. CC BY-NC 2.0

” Day133: Flickr keeps you studying!” By Abdulrahman AlZe3bi. CC BY-NC 2.0

At the Library, there really is no such thing as a stupid question. Did you know that the most common question we get asked is, “Where are the bathrooms?” Helping you to find the bathroom is just one of the many ways we can help in the Library.

Many students get stuck with pesky research, writing and referencing questions over the course of the semester. At every branch Library, you can have your researching and referencing questions answered straight away at the Library Helpdesk. Our staff are trained to help you get started and point you in the right direction to get your assignments started.

If you have a longer or more complicated question, the Library can provide support for your studies through a Study Solutions appointment. By booking a Study Solutions appointment, you can get a 25 minute face to face appointment for help with your study, research and assignments. From understanding your assignment question, providing feedback on a draft, to working in groups, or organising your work/study load, we are here to help.

You can book a 25 minute consultation from Week 3. Bookings open a week in advance and fill up quickly – so be prepared and book early.

If you miss out on an appointment, never fear! Drop-in sessions are available at both Gardens Point and Kelvin Grove libraries from 12pm-2pm, Tuesday to Thursday. The time of your consultation will depend on how many students are waiting – so be prepared and have your burning question ready and waiting to maximise your time.

So! You’ve booked a consultation or you’re planning on coming to a drop-in session…. what can you do to prepare yourself to get the best out of your Study Solutions session?

1. Be on time! Make sure to note the date, time, and location of your consultation. Write it in your phone, diary, or the back of your hand. Remember you can keep track of your bookings online.

2. Come to your consultation with something specific to work on. Whether it be your assignment question, your draft, a particular study issue you’ve been having, or a question about a resource – this helps us to tailor the support specifically to your needs. Please remember that library staff cannot proofread assignments for you, we can give you tips and strategies so you can proofread yourself (hint: read your assignment out loud to the mirror!).

3. Check our online study resources and see if your question is answered there. If you familiar yourself with resources such as Cite Write, Studywell, and Studysmart, you’ll be well on your way to being a top student on your own!

4. If you’re looking for specific academic language and learning support you can get in touch with Academic Language and Learning Services (ALLS) to arrange an appointment. Language and Learning Educators are specially trained to help students and staff who need help with speaking and writing.

 

Journal Impact Factors

""

CC BY 2.0

The 2014 Journal Impact Factors (JIFs) have arrived from Thomson Reuters. You can find them right now in Journal Citation Reports (JCR). A JIF for a journal for a given year measures the overall number of citations of articles published in that journal in the two previous years, and divides them by the number of citable items of that journal for those two years.

Example: JIF= (2011 citations to 2010+2009 articles)/(no. of “citable” articles published in 2009+2010)

Highlights in JCR this year:

  • 272 new journals have received their first Impact Factor.
  • 53% of journals will receive an increase in their Impact Factor.
  • 39 titles have been suppressed, either for high rates of self-citation or ‘citation stacking’. (Suppression from the JCR lasts one year and requires reevaluation before a journal is relisted.)
  • 11,149 journals are ranked. Australian journals make up a small percentage of that number.

What’s new?

While editors and researchers are very much interested in the Journal Impact Factors (JIFs), there is a new complementary calculation so that journals can be compared within and between subject disciplines.

The JIF Percentile translates a journal’s category rank into a percentile. For example, a journal that is ranked 19 out of 291 Biochemistry & Molecular Biology journals would receive a JIF Percentile score of 0.94. * JIF Percentile is calculated as (n – r + .5)/n where n = number of journals in the category and r = descending rank of the journal within that category.

More information?