Referencing Hack #7 – Referencing work quoted by someone else with QUT APA

Referencing an author you read quoted in a book or article by a completely different author can be tricky. Ideally you should find the original source of the quotation but this may not always be possible. But if you can’t, no worries, QUT Library is here to help with our next Referencing Hack!

To reference an author quoted in another work in your reference list, you only need to provide a reference for the source you actually read. This is known as the “secondary source” because it is one step removed from the original source of the idea or quotation. Don’t reference the original source if you haven’t read it yourself, this is a big referencing no-no. In the text of your assignment you need to cite the original author but add the prefix “as cited in” along with the citation for the secondary source after the original authors surname.

Here is an example of how to reference this type of information in the text of your assignment –

Image of an example in text citation. The example is a short quote that reads, according to Rowling open round bracket as cited in Jones 2015 page 301 close round bracket, the Dursleys were open quotation mark were proud to say that they were perfectly normal, thank you very much. Close quotation mark.

The secondary source is Jones (the text you actually read) so Jones is the resource that will appear in the reference list.

For your reference list only include the secondary source information, like so –

Image of an example of an entry in a reference list. The example is author of work which is Jones, F. Year of publication which is Open bracket 2015 close bracket. Title of book which is Juxtapositions of magic and suburbia in late twentieth century fiction. Place of publication which is New York, New York. Publisher which is Powell.

Check QUT Cite|Write APA for how to reference a book, journal article or other types of sources your secondary source might be. Plus you can find more information about referencing authors quoted in another author’s other work in QUT Cite|Write. Just go to the bottom of the page under “need help with” and look for further information on Authors.

Don’t forget to check out our other Referencing Hacks for help with your referencing! Or contact us for further assistance.

Referencing Hacks #6 – Numbered Images

Numbered referencing can be one tough cookie to crack. One particular question we get asked a lot is how to reference an image taken from the internet using QUT Numbered referencing. Have no fear! We have consulted the experts and this is the template we recommend.

[number] Author. Title of image [image on the Internet]. Date [cited date]. Available from: URL

Don’t have all of these pieces of information for your image? Here are some handy hints on how to navigate this.

  • No author? Check for an organisation or corporate author. If still none, omit this information
  • No date? Replace this section with [date unknown].
  • No title? Write a brief description of the image in square brackets and put this where the title would be.

Of course this only makes sense with some examples. Have a look at these to get more of an idea of what your numbered reference should look like for an image.

[1] Breath in cold air [image on the Internet]. [date unknown] [cited 2017 Sept 11]. Available from: https://motorimpairment.neura.edu.au/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/breathing1.jpg

[2] Centres for Disease Control and Prevention. Shingles on face [image on the Internet]. 2011 [cited 2017 Aug 22]. Available from: http://www.cdc.gov/shingles/about/photos.html

[3] Wisegeek. [Exterior view of ear with dry skin] [image on the Internet]. [date unknown] [cited 2017 Sept 11]. Available from: http://www.wisegeek.com/how-do-i-treat-dry-skin-in-the-ears.htm#

You can view more referencing hacks from QUT Library and if you need assistance, contact your referencing experts!

Referencing Hack #4 – What’s in a numbered reference?

One question we get asked a lot at the library is what are all the parts that make up the reference? This referencing hack breaks down a QUT Numbered reference so that we can fully understand all the components of it.

Here is our example, which is a journal article with DOI (Digital Object Identifier).

And here are what all the parts, separated by different colours, refer to.

Grey – This is the number assigned to the reference in text. These run consecutively with the first reference having the number [1] then the next reference has [2] and so on.

Pink – These are the authors of the journal article.

Light green – This is the title of the journal article.

Light Blue – This is the abbreviated name of the journal that this article was published in.

Orange – The online medium on which you accessed this article. This is usually [Internet].

Dark blue – The year the journal article was published.

Purple – The exact date that you referenced this article in your assignment.

Red – Information about the journal article. The volume number comes first and the issue number (if the article has one) follows in brackets.

Dark green – This refers to the number of computer screens the online resource runs over i.e. roughly how many screens did you scroll through to read the whole article?

Black – This is the URL of the journal article.

Yellow – The DOI [Digital Object Identifier] of the journal article.

These sections can be applied to other examples of numbered referencing also, with perhaps small tweaks. You can view more examples on QUT cite|write. If you need further assistance with understanding your referencing don’t forget you can always contact a referencing expert!

 

Referencing Hack #3 QUT Harvard Style

QUT Harvard is one of the four referencing styles we use at QUT and is based on The Chicago Manual of Style. Like APA, Harvard is what we refer to as an “Author/Date” style and refers to how the beginning of your reference should start.

Students in the Faculty of Creative Industries and School of Justice will be most familiar with QUT Harvard. A question we are asked often is how to cite a TV show or movie. When you are looking for the “author” of the work, who do we attribute credit to? Is it the director, writer, or producer? In the case of QUT Harvard you should always use the writer’s name as the lead reference, followed by the year it was produced, title of the work, the director and producer, where and who it was published by, and lastly the format of the resource.

Example (Writer as main author): Atherden, Geoffrey. 1986. Babakiueria. Directed by Don Featherstone. Produced by Julian Pringle. Sydney: Australian Broadcasting Corporation. DVD.

If the writer of the source is not credited you should then choose the person who is most responsible for creating the work.

Example (Director as main author): Featherstone, Don. 1986. Babakiueria. Produced by Julian Pringle. Sydney: Australian Broadcasting Corporation. DVD.

Key takeaway – if you can’t find a specific referencing example on QUT Cite | Write, you can always build your own reference using parts from other examples. Did you access your TV show or movie from an online database? Add the URL to the end of your reference. The trick for all of these is to be consistent and if you have any questions make sure to contact the Library.

Referencing Hack #1 – Edited eBooks

With assignments getting finalised, referencing is high on the To Do list. Over the next week or so we will be sharing our top tips for referencing to make completing your assignment that much easier.

The first tip we want to share is referencing a chapter in an edited eBook with QUT APA. Although there are no specific examples in QUT cite|write on how to do this, we recommend combining the references for Chapter in an Edited Book and Electronic Book (eBook) together. You keep the first half of the Chapter in an edited book example but when you get to the publishing details exchange them for the eBook details including the eBook platform and the URL or DOI for the eBook. Below are 2 examples, from the APA Blog, on how put this all together.

The second example contains a DOI, which is a Digital Object Identifier, and should always be used if available over a standard web address.

Key takeaway – even if you can’t find a specific referencing example for your resource on QUT Cite Write, you can build your own reference using parts from other examples. This goes for many referencing styles! However, if you are unsure about your referencing, you can always contact the library for assistance.

Have a tricky referencing question? Let us know know can add it to our Referencing Hack series!