Referencing Hack #3 QUT Harvard Style

QUT Harvard is one of the four referencing styles we use at QUT and is based on The Chicago Manual of Style. Like APA, Harvard is what we refer to as an “Author/Date” style and refers to how the beginning of your reference should start.

Students in the Faculty of Creative Industries and School of Justice will be most familiar with QUT Harvard. A question we are asked often is how to cite a TV show or movie. When you are looking for the “author” of the work, who do we attribute credit to? Is it the director, writer, or producer? In the case of QUT Harvard you should always use the writer’s name as the lead reference, followed by the year it was produced, title of the work, the director and producer, where and who it was published by, and lastly the format of the resource.

Example (Writer as main author): Atherden, Geoffrey. 1986. Babakiueria. Directed by Don Featherstone. Produced by Julian Pringle. Sydney: Australian Broadcasting Corporation. DVD.

If the writer of the source is not credited you should then choose the person who is most responsible for creating the work.

Example (Director as main author): Featherstone, Don. 1986. Babakiueria. Produced by Julian Pringle. Sydney: Australian Broadcasting Corporation. DVD.

Key takeaway – if you can’t find a specific referencing example on QUT Cite | Write, you can always build your own reference using parts from other examples. Did you access your TV show or movie from an online database? Add the URL to the end of your reference. The trick for all of these is to be consistent and if you have any questions make sure to contact the Library.

One Librarian One Reference – Wikipedia and Librarians

Whether or not you use it, Wikipedia is a wealth of knowledge and information on just about every aspect of the world we live in, from the composition of an atom to the synopsis of your favourite television program. Students are often warned about citing Wikipedia in an academic setting because entries are created and edited by you, the user, which means anyone could create an unreliable entry which could be mistaken as fact. Anyone familiar with the internet would consider it dangerous to trust a source of information created by a group of anonymous users however Wikipedia has garnered for itself a reputation for being the first point-of-call for many knowledge seekers.

In the age of fake news, how can I tell Wikipedia is accurate?

Take a look at this article for some tips on how to tell if the wiki page you are reading is a reliable source of information. One of the first things you should do is check the citations of the article which are the little blue numbers which appear above a sentence in Wikipedia. The number will lead you to the source of the information cited in the article. If the article is credible, the information will be from an academic journal or other reliable source. QUT Library’s Finding Information page has some helpful resources to help you evaluate online sources.

How are Librarians helping the cause?

This is where the hashtag #1lib1ref comes in – this is a worldwide initiative where librarians (and you!) come together to edit Wikipedia pages by searching for uncited statements and adding a citation using a reliable source. You can read more about it on the WikiMedia page.