Reading at University

Week 1 is over and university work is starting to kick in, this includes readings for each of your units.

Image of QUT Readings home page with the log in button on the right hand side of the top level menu highlighted in a yellow box with a yellow arrow pointing to it, saying click here.

The best place to access your readings is through your Blackboard Unit site. Under the Learning Resources tab you should be able to see QUT Readings. This will take you to the readings assigned for your unit and can include books, book chapters, journal articles, videos and lots more. You can access QUT Readings directly as well and search for a unit code as well as for past exam papers. Make sure when you are in QUT Readings that you click the log in button so that you can access all of the resources available. Visit QUT Library to find out more about how to find your readings and textbooks.

The first few weeks of university life can be overwhelming at times, especially with all of the readings you have to do before, after and during class. To assist you with doing your readings and to stop them from taking up all of your study time, QUT Library has put together a quick video to tell you about different strategies to use when reading such as skimming and scanning.

QUT Library has also put together a short workshop, Read it, Note it, Recall it, that you can access online anytime you like. This workshop gives you some more reading tips as well as some notetaking tips too! QUT has other online workshops available to assist with writing for university, researching for your assignments and referencing. You can access these online anytime you like.

If you have any questions about how to access your readings or need further assistance with reading strategies you can contact the library!

“I Got This Hat” – National Simultaneous Storytime 2016

Last Wednesday, as part of Library and Information Week, QUT Kelvin Grove and Caboolture libraries hosted the annual National Simultaneous Storytime which aims to encourage young Australians to read and enjoy books.

Local kindergartens supported the event and thoroughly enjoyed the reading of the book ‘I Got This Hat’ written by Jol and Kate Temple. Education students assisted the Library staff to organise the activities and enjoyed dressing up for the occasion maybe more than the children did.

CAB NSS 2016 Reading

From puppet play, dressing up and colouring in, to exploring the uses of an app called ‘Quiver’ on the iPads, the children were immersed in the book and enjoyed reading about different hats. There were also pirate hats to be made and games to play with the “I got this hat’ book app.

This is an event not to be missed next year!

National Simultaneous Storytime

Today is National Simultaneous Storytime! It is the part of Library and Information week and promotes reading and enjoying books to young Australians. Every year a picture book is chosen from an Australian author and illustrator and read simultaneously in libraries, schools, pre-schools, childcare centers, homes, bookshops and wherever else anyone can around the country!NSS2016-Web-Heading

This fun and exciting event encourages the value of reading and literacy. It addresses key areas of learning from the National Curriculum for Grades 1 – 6 and the pre-school Early Learning Years Framework. It is a great opportunity to get together and share the joys of books and reading.

I-Got-This-Hat-cover-imageThis year’s National Simultaneous Storytime book is I Got This Hat by Jol and Kate Temple, illustrated by Jon Foye. Around the country at 11am the story will be told simultaneously for all to enjoy. Even if you can’t make it by 11am or to a Storytime in person, have no fear for everyone can enjoy National Simultaneous Storytime.  It doesn’t matter whether you are at home, school, a public library or even a university student,  you can watch the video of I Got This Hat!

And to top it all off (literally!) why not wear a fun hat or make your own pirate hat to show your enthusiasm and support for National Simultaneous Storytime?

Reading for the holidays

Did you know now that semester is over you can actually read for fun?

QUT Library subscribes to some fantastic online resources which you can read on your mobile device when you take a break from uni. Whether you are jetting-off on an overseas adventure or relaxing by the pool, our ebook and audiobook choices will put you right into holiday mode.

Overdrive and BorrowBox are two options where you can read or listen to books online. You can download books to either your mobile phone, tablet, or desktop computer.

 

Goodbye Mad Men

10eHave you ever loved a television program so much that you cried when it ended? There were more than a few sad faces in the library when the season finale of Mad Men rolled around. We even had a tribute magnetic scrabble game on our staff message-board.

Mad Men ran for 7 seasons and reintroduced the modern world to the fashion, politics, and home-life of 1960’s America. We saw a glimpse of what life was like for the ad-men (and women!) of New York in a sometimes romanticised and sometimes no-holds-barred kind of way. The series grew to be a cultural phenomenon not only for the nostalgic value but for the social commentaries on gender, race equality, and of course, advertising.

Do you want to live in the world of 1960’s Madison Avenue for a little longer? Why not check out some of the awesome titles we have in our collection.

Books

Mad men unbuttoned : a romp through 1960s America / Natasha Vargas-Cooper.
Mad men and philosophy : nothing is as it seems / edited by Rod Carveth and James B. South.
Mid-century ads : advertising from the Mad Men era / edited by Jim Heimann ; introduction by Steven Heller.

E-Books

Mad Men and Politics [electronic resource] : Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America / Lilly J. Goren.
Mad Men, Mad World [electronic resource] : Sex, Politics, Style, and the 1960s. / Lauren M.E. Goodlad.
Analyzing Mad Men [electronic resource] : Critical Essays on the Television Series. / Scott F. Stoddart.

DVDs

Nineteen Sixties Drama

Print vs ebook showdown

Here's something print books can do that eBooks can't! "Book Sculptures" by  Paradasos  (CC BY-NC 2.0)

Well you can’t do this with an eBook! “Book Sculptures” by Paradasos (CC BY-NC 2.0)

Here in the QUT Library we don’t believe that print books and ebooks should be pitted against each other and held up to be mortal enemies forevermore. There are pros and cons to each and the new book smell is only a small plus for print after all.

But we’re reasonable like that. The rest of the world seems intent on the print versus electronic battle continuing on as evidenced last week by the Huffington Post article ‘Sorry ebooks. These 9 studies show why print is better’.

Among the nine pro-print reasons was an interesting point about the high ‘distractability’ of an ebook. In a blog for The Huffington Post, Naomi S. Baron noted that in “studies I have done with university students in several countries confirm what I bet you’ll find yourself observing,” she writes. ‘When reading either for (school) work or pleasure, the preponderance of students found it easiest to concentrate when reading in print. They also reported multitasking almost three times as much when reading onscreen as when reading in hard copy.”

It’s an interesting observation regarding the ability of the reader to hone concentration when reading the written word as opposed to digital and is something this Blog has discussed before. However, the benefits and convenience of ebooks can’t be denied and for those who want print – ebooks do have capacity for printing portions to allow for the best of both worlds!

So there’s no need to be Team Print or Team Ebook but if you have an preference for one over the other in different situations, let us know in the comments below!

 

Blind date with a book!

Book Swap - Located Level 3 Kelvin Grove Library.

Book Swap – Located Level 3 Kelvin Grove Library.

When Valentine’s Day comes around some people are thinking about flowers or chocolates while others are rolling their eyes. How about ditching the chocolate and putting your eyes to good use by … reading a book!

I’m sure you’ve heard of the saying ‘You can’t judge a book by its cover’ and what better way to put the idiom to literal use than by going on a blind date with a book?

The Book Swap located on Level 3 at Kelvin Grove Library has a number of titles waiting to be picked up and read – all you need to do is swap it with a book of your own. Make it a little bit interesting by wrapping your book in brown paper and writing a few hints on the front.

On a side note – 14 February has been adopted by librarians in Australia as Library Lovers Day! Show your appreciation for your local librarian by popping in and saying hi.

Summer Series Two – Summer reading

'2012-205 Reading' by Denise Krebs (CC BY 2.0)

‘2012-205 Reading’ by Denise Krebs (CC BY 2.0)

The QUT Library is ready and willing to enable a Summer spent reading in the hammock or by the pool.

You may be unaware of QUT Library’s extensive holdings of recreational reading material — both fiction and non-fiction — that is yours to borrow. So come and stock up so you can simply move from one book to the next without leaving your comfy spot. Whether it be literary classics, latest award winners or easy reads then the QUT Library has something to suit everyone.

Here are some classic summer-themed books to get you started:

To kill a mockingbird / Harper Lee. A young girl growing up in an Alabama town in the 1930s learns of injustice and violence when her father, a widowed lawyer, defends a black man falsely accused of rape —  from Worldcat. Deceptively simple, this is one of my all time favourite books that I re-read every year!

The great Gatsby / F. Scott Fitzgerald. The Great Gatsby is a 1925 novel written by American author F. Scott Fitzgerald which follows a cast of characters living in the fictional town of West Egg on prosperous Long Island in the summer of 1922. The story primarily concerns the young and mysterious millionaire Jay Gatsby and his quixotic passion and obsession for the beautiful former debutante Daisy Buchana. — from Wikipedia.

Let the great world spin / Colum McCann. Award-winner Let the Great World Spin is a novel laced together by several different narratives, spanning from a waspy Park Avenue wife of a judge to a hooker to an Irish immigrant. The common thread? All characters are centered in New York City, summer blazing, while the Vietnam War rages on abroad. Despite the chaos abroad and on US soil, the city comes to a standstill when onlookers spot a man begin to walk on a tightrope between the World Trade Center towers. — from flavourwire

Atonement / Ian McEwan. In 1935, 13-year-old fledgling writer Briony Tallis and her family live a life of wealth and privilege in their enormous mansion. On the warmest day of the year, the country estate takes on an unsettling hothouse atmosphere, stoking Briony’s vivid imagination. Robbie Turner, the educated son of the family’s housekeeper, carries a torch for Briony’s headstrong older sister Cecilia. He hopes that Cecilia has comparable feelings. All it will take is one spark for this relationship to combust. When it does, Briony — who has a crush on Robbie — is compelled to interfere. She goes so far as to accuse Robbie of a crime he did not commit. Cecilia and Robbie declare their love for each other, but, ultimately, he is arrested. Briony bears false witness and the course of three lives is changed forever. — from Wikipedia

Come and browse the shelves or search for particular titles using the Library catalogue.

And if an eBook reader is on your Christmas list, then you’ll be pleased to know that many titles are available for loan as eBooks, or audiobooks,  downloadable from the Library website. So you don’t even have to interrupt your lolling to restock your reading material!

Let us know your favourite summer-themed book or a book you re-read every year!

Why you’ve already forgotten how this sentence began

"Memory write/read failure" by  Marek Isalski (CC BY-SA 2.0)

“Memory write/read failure” by Marek Isalski
(CC BY-SA 2.0)

It is easy to under-appreciate how much you read on a screen each day – hey, look you’re doing it right now – and this ease and availability of content is one great benefit of the Internet. But, it seems  most technological advancements have a flip side and what researchers from Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand, have found definitely affects you as students or researchers!

As the average student is faced with weekly readings reaching double digits each week, it stands to reason that you’re attempting to read many of these on screen wherever possible. However, in their paper ‘Is Google making us stupid? The Impact of the Internet on Reading Behaviour’  authors Val Hooper and Channa Herath reveal that unfortunately, online reading appears to have negative effects on our cognition. Concentration, comprehension, recall and absorption rates all scored lower when reading online compared to paper-based reading. It appears that this offline/paper-based reading allows for ‘deep reading’ and the ability to annotate papers further assisted in information absorption and retention in both the short and long term.

All these benefits, of course, have to weighed up against the dollar cost of printing out every item you have to read and the environmental impact of doing so as well. But being aware from the outset that reading online may be putting you behind-the-eightball then you can employ some strategies to help get the most out of your readings on the screen and to counter this possible screen-nesia.  QUT Library’s Studywell has some strategies and resources for effective reading and notetaking.

There is an element of irony in this post being published in an online medium so do your best and try to remember what you’ve learned here today – may I suggest taking some notes by hand to assist in you in your retention?

Ahhhhh new book smell

So, who doesn’t love that giddying aroma of a new book?

For those that like to dig beneath the romanticism to some bare bones facts here is what you’re actually smelling: varying amounts of Vinyl acetate ethylene; alkyl ketene dimer and hydrogen peroxide just to name a few of the chemicals behind that addictive perfume.

In total, books will actually give off several hundred volatile organic compounds!

'The aroma of new books' By Compound Interest (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)

‘The aroma of new books’ By Compound Interest (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)

For a constant supply of New Books – and their smell- sign up to our monthly feed of new titles and be the first to know what’s new!