QUT helps break down the digital divide

Knowledge Unlatched logoIn 2014, QUT signed up as a founding member of a global initiative called Knowledge Unlatched (KU) which unites the two approaches of crowd-funding and Open Access to support the publication of specialist scholarly books.   Digital copies of the books supported by KU can be freely accessed by anyone in the world via OAPEN, HathiTrust and the British Library.  Libraries can include the books in their collections free of charge.

Frances Pinter, the Embassador/Founder of KU, says that the approach “ensures that in the digital world we are not just replicating the old print model, but that we can indeed do better and contribute to breaking down what is fast becoming a new digital divide.”

Frances Pinter will be giving a talk at the State Library of Queensland on Thursday 23 November 2017, 2:00pm – 3.00pm :

“Transforming publishing — issues around policy, funding and publishing”

Register for this free event here.

Contact Paula Callan, Scholarly Communications Librarian, for further details.

Don’t anyone panic!

QUT Library will still be open over the Summer Semester, however we will be closed between Christmas & New Year.

Each of your QUT library branches will provide a cool and calm place to work in air-conditioned comfort throughout the Summer semester.

Online chat will also continue for the Summer semester with QUT staff at the keyboard seven days a week.

Summer Semester Library opening hours are:

GARDENS POINT LIBRARY
18th November – 22nd December
Mon – Fri 8am-6pm
Sat & Sun 9am-5pm
CLOSED 23rd December to 1st January
2nd Jan – 16th February
Mon – Fri 8am-6pm
Sat & Sun 9am-5pm

LAW LIBRARY
18th November – 22nd December
Mon – Fri 8am-6pm
Sat & Sun closed
CLOSED 23rd December to 1st January
2nd Jan – 16th February
Mon – Fri 8am-6pm
Sat & Sun closed

KELVIN GROVE LIBRARY
18th November – 22nd December
Mon – Fri 8am-6pm
Sat & Sun 1pm-5pm
CLOSED 23rd December to 1st January
2nd Jan – 16th February
Mon – Fri 8am-6pm
Sat & Sun 1pm-5pm

CABOOLTURE LIBRARY
18th November – 22nd December
Mon – Fri 8am-4pm
Sat & Sun closed
CLOSED 23rd December to 1st January
2nd January –  7th January
Mon – Fri 8am-4pm
Sat & Sun closed
The Caboolture campus will transfer to the University of the Sunshine Coast from 8th January 2018

LIBRARY CHAT
18th November – 22nd December
Mon – Fri 8am-6pm
Sat & Sun 9am-5pm
CLOSED 23rd December to 1st January
2nd Jan – 16th February
Mon – Fri 8am-6pm
Sat & Sun 9am-5pm

 

Virtual Reality comes to the Games Lab at QUT Library!

Virtual Reality comes to the Games Lab at QUT Library! And it’s yours to explore. Borrow the PlayStation VR Headset from HiQ at Kelvin Grove and experience immersive virtual reality.

pexels-photo-123335 by Bradley Hook available at https://www.pexels.com/photo/sky-woman-clouds-girl-123335/ (CC0 license)

Ocean Descent, Danger Ball, The Luge, Resident Evil Biohazard and Batman Arkham are just some of the games and experiences available.

More VR games coming soon! Got a game to suggest? Let us know at askqut@qut.edu.au or tweet to @qutlibrary

Games in the Library

International Games Week is coming up and QUT Library is on board! We are setting up play dates at three of our campus libraries which will include a large variety of board games, including Monopoly, Twister and Yahtzee, old school Nintendo and new school Oculus Rift.

Not only are games super fun they also allow you to give your mind a break from all the intense study you are sure to be doing at the moment. By taking a 5-10 minute break you can recharge your brain plus gain glory by being the ultimate twister champion!

Here are all the details you need to know to get your game on –

Tuesday 31st October, 10am – 12pm

  • Gardens Point Library, V Block, Level 3 Activity Room

Wednesday 1st November, 12-2pm

  • Law Library at Gardens Point, C Block, Level 5 Industrial Moot Court (C507)

Friday 3rd November, 12-2pm

  • Kelvin Grove Library, R Block, Level 4 Games Lab

Remember, playing games is not only good for your soul but good for your brain! We hope to see you there and wish all you gamers a GG!

Virtual Reality in the Library

QUT Library at Kelvin Grove will be showcasing our Virtual Reality resources during Week 13. Try various VR headsets including Oculus Rift, PlayStation and Voxkin , and discover the wide range of VR content available to you from the Library!

Come and join us in the Games Lab on Level 4 and HiQ Level 2 on Wednesday 25th and Thursday 26th of October between 1pm-3pm.

Can’t make it to the library then? We have you covered! Our Games Lab is open the same time as HiQ so you can pop in and play the PS4 and Xbox One to your hearts content. Plus we have a whole bunch of games available for you to play and borrow.

Hopefully we will see you for some fun with virtual reality or maybe borrowing some games!

Referencing Hack #7 – Referencing work quoted by someone else with QUT APA

Referencing an author you read quoted in a book or article by a completely different author can be tricky. Ideally you should find the original source of the quotation but this may not always be possible. But if you can’t, no worries, QUT Library is here to help with our next Referencing Hack!

To reference an author quoted in another work in your reference list, you only need to provide a reference for the source you actually read. This is known as the “secondary source” because it is one step removed from the original source of the idea or quotation. Don’t reference the original source if you haven’t read it yourself, this is a big referencing no-no. In the text of your assignment you need to cite the original author but add the prefix “as cited in” along with the citation for the secondary source after the original authors surname.

Here is an example of how to reference this type of information in the text of your assignment –

Image of an example in text citation. The example is a short quote that reads, according to Rowling open round bracket as cited in Jones 2015 page 301 close round bracket, the Dursleys were open quotation mark were proud to say that they were perfectly normal, thank you very much. Close quotation mark.

The secondary source is Jones (the text you actually read) so Jones is the resource that will appear in the reference list.

For your reference list only include the secondary source information, like so –

Image of an example of an entry in a reference list. The example is author of work which is Jones, F. Year of publication which is Open bracket 2015 close bracket. Title of book which is Juxtapositions of magic and suburbia in late twentieth century fiction. Place of publication which is New York, New York. Publisher which is Powell.

Check QUT Cite|Write APA for how to reference a book, journal article or other types of sources your secondary source might be. Plus you can find more information about referencing authors quoted in another author’s other work in QUT Cite|Write. Just go to the bottom of the page under “need help with” and look for further information on Authors.

Don’t forget to check out our other Referencing Hacks for help with your referencing! Or contact us for further assistance.

Odd socks day…because everyone can have an odd day!

On Friday 6th October put on your odd socks and to help remove the stigma surrounding mental health with Odd Socks Day! Stigma associated with mental illness is one of the biggest barriers to people looking for help. By wearing odd socks you can show your support, plus look great while doing it!

Mental illness has far reaching effects, even if you are not the one in five Australians who might experience it you cannot evade its impact for long. Whether you know someone who is suffering or are suffering yourself there is no condemnation for reaching out for help. Everyone will face the consequences of mental illness at some point, whether financial, social or emotional. QUT offers a lot of support including personal support and counselling as well as financial help and support.

QUT Library also has many resources available so you can learn more about mental health. Whether you are curious, want to support someone or need some advice, you can stay informed with these mental health books, ebooks and videos.

So this Friday make sure to wear your odd socks and share it with us on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram #oddsocksday because everyone can have an odd day!

Different socks

Information Searching #3 – Lexis Advance

For those who have to do legal research you may be familiar with Lexis Advance, previously known as Lexis Nexis. Legal research can be a daunting prospect but Lexis Advance’s new design has lots of handy little tricks that can give you a leg up on your legal research. Here are our Law Librarians top tips for getting started with Lexis Advance.

  1. Advanced Search – This is where all the old search forms from Lexis Nexis have gone including Cases and Legislation. These advanced search forms allow you make your search more specific. For example you can search for cases related to a provision of legislation or for legislation that contains a defined term. 
  2. Analytical Materials – This is what all secondary sources in Lexis Advanced are called and this includes dictionaries, encyclopaedias, journal articles and commentaries. Use the Advanced Search form for Analytical Material to search throughout all secondary sources. Or locate the full list of Analytical Materials for Australia by selecting the Browse button at the top of the screen > Publications > Australia > By Content Type > AU Analytical Materials. 
  3. Search Everything – This button is located next to the main, red search box and is very powerful! If you click on it options appear for narrowing your search. This includes jurisdictions and content such as cases, legislation, analytical materials and forms and precedents. You can also narrow by legal topics and any recent publication or searches you have looked at. 
  4. Favourites – Add your most used searches or publications to your favourites box so you can easily access them. This is one of the best parts about Lexis Advance! You can do this by clicking the star next to the publication title either when in the publication itself or by looking at the Recent & Favourites tab under the Search Everything button. Once the star is yellow it’s a favourite, yay! And you can access it from the home page of Lexis Advance.

For more assistance with legal research pop into the Gardens Point Law Library on Level 5 of C Block or contact us! 

Referencing Hacks #6 – Numbered Images

Numbered referencing can be one tough cookie to crack. One particular question we get asked a lot is how to reference an image taken from the internet using QUT Numbered referencing. Have no fear! We have consulted the experts and this is the template we recommend.

[number] Author. Title of image [image on the Internet]. Date [cited date]. Available from: URL

Don’t have all of these pieces of information for your image? Here are some handy hints on how to navigate this.

  • No author? Check for an organisation or corporate author. If still none, omit this information
  • No date? Replace this section with [date unknown].
  • No title? Write a brief description of the image in square brackets and put this where the title would be.

Of course this only makes sense with some examples. Have a look at these to get more of an idea of what your numbered reference should look like for an image.

[1] Breath in cold air [image on the Internet]. [date unknown] [cited 2017 Sept 11]. Available from: https://motorimpairment.neura.edu.au/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/breathing1.jpg

[2] Centres for Disease Control and Prevention. Shingles on face [image on the Internet]. 2011 [cited 2017 Aug 22]. Available from: http://www.cdc.gov/shingles/about/photos.html

[3] Wisegeek. [Exterior view of ear with dry skin] [image on the Internet]. [date unknown] [cited 2017 Sept 11]. Available from: http://www.wisegeek.com/how-do-i-treat-dry-skin-in-the-ears.htm#

You can view more referencing hacks from QUT Library and if you need assistance, contact your referencing experts!

Finding Information #2 – Searching PubMed

PubMed is a freely available version of the U.S. National Library of Medicine’s MEDLINE database and also provides access to some additional content not selected for MEDLINE. PubMed doesn’t contain full-text articles, but may link to publishers’ websites and other resources

Access PubMed via QUT Library’s Databases and specialised search tools. You can then select Health or view all databases to find the PubMed link. When you connect to PubMed, using your QUT login details, and search for information a QUT Fulltext Finder link may appear. This allows you to check if a fulltext copy of an article is available via QUT Library.

Simple steps for searching PubMed:

  1. Identify your search terms for each of your main concepts
  2. Perform a simple search by entering terms in the PubMed search box
  3. Include terms from the controlled vocabulary MeSH (Medical Subject Headings)
  4. Use the advanced search to see your search history and combine searches
  5. Apply limits to your search results using the filters sidebar

PubMed uses Automatic Term Mapping which automatically searches for phrases and MeSH terms. Check for successful mapping to MeSH terms by viewing the “Search details” box on your Search results page.

For more help searching PubMed, check out the comprehensive online PubMed Tutorial.