Welcome to semester 2!

Blink and it is semester 2 already! Welcome to all the newcomers and welcome back to all the old hands. Are you ready to get back into study? O-Week is over and done with, so it’s time to get back into the game.

A couple of things to get you up to speed for second semester:

  1. QUT Readings has replaced the CMD (course materials database)
  2. Assignments are to be submitted online now – Goodbye Assignment Minder!
  3. QUT is now smoke free

If you’re a new student make sure to come to the Library Helpdesk and grab a hard-copy of Cite Write and have a chat to the friendly librarians who are waiting to help with all your study needs and questions. Don’t forget you can also contact us online, we’re always here to help!

Save the Date for Open Repositories 2017 Conference!

brisbane-1222078_1920 croppedGriffith University, QUT and UQ are ecstatic to announce that Brisbane will be hosting the annual Open Repositories 2017 Conference. This international conference first started back in 2006 and Australia was the very first host. It is really exciting to see it come back to the land of kangaroos and Tim Tams and more importantly Brisbane!

This conference brings together library and information professionals from a range of backgrounds including higher education, government, galleries, libraries, archives and museums. These industries bring their brilliant users and developers of open digital repository platforms to provide an interactive forum. Around 400 people from all over the world are expected to attend this forum in order to explore the global challenges and opportunities facing libraries and the broader scholarly information landscape.

Linda O’Brien’s, Pro Vice Chancellor, Information Services at Griffith University, remarks from the recent press release clearly highlights what this successful bid means –

“This announcement confirms what we already know – Australian universities are amongst the most innovative around the world and that Brisbane is a world-class conference destination.”

The specifics of the conference are below –

Date: 26-30 June 2017

Venue: Hilton, Brisbane

For further information you can check out their website and sign up to their mailing list.

So, if you have an interest in digital repositories or want to learn more about them make sure you save this date!

 

Study Hack – Online You

FacebookGoodEvil_JBHave you even sat down and Googled yourself just to see what would come up? Have you ever thought about what your online presence is? Take a look at our social media skills page to read up on how to Create a better online you. Your future self (and employers) will thank you for it!

So much of our lives, including studying, can and is being done online. We have universities course groups on Facebook, industry professionals to meet and follow on Twitter, Instgram and Flickr, Google+ community pages and blogs to follow and gain insight on particular topics. This is all great, however, it is worth thinking about the darker side of online technology. People are more available but also more hidden at the same time. How do you really know who you are talking to?

LookForHelpOnline_JBSo make sure you are getting the best out of your online presence and use it wisely. Create a linked in profile so that professionals within your industry can see your achievements. Ask questions to your tutor if they have created a Facebook group for your class. You can also speak directly to QUT Library staff online too through our Chat to a Librarian service. So even if you can’t get in to uni study help is still available!

Reading for the holidays

Did you know now that semester is over you can actually read for fun?

QUT Library subscribes to some fantastic online resources which you can read on your mobile device when you take a break from uni. Whether you are jetting-off on an overseas adventure or relaxing by the pool, our ebook and audiobook choices will put you right into holiday mode.

Overdrive and BorrowBox are two options where you can read or listen to books online. You can download books to either your mobile phone, tablet, or desktop computer.

 

Follow us!

Calling all social media fiends!

Do you want to keep up-to-date with all of the funky and informative things happening at QUT Library? Great! Take a look at some of our social media accounts while you’re on the bus and get to know the library a little better.

Not only do we have the usual Facebook and Twitter (what would librarians do without Twitter?), we’ve got Pinterest, Youtube, Instagram, and Flickr. All of these tools paint a picture of what the library has to offer. Stay tuned for more in-depth posts about the benefits of subscribing to each of these accounts.

Novelember

'Writing = Breathing' by Joe Flood (CC BY-ND 2.0)

‘Writing = Breathing’ by Joe Flood (CC BY-ND 2.0)

November is many things. In addition to Movember, Melbourne cup, end of semester (woot!) and start-christmas-shopping month it is also National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo).  Valuing enthusiasm, determination, and a deadline, NaNoWriMo is for anyone who has ever thought, even fleetingly, about writing a novel.

NaNoWriMo was established in 1999 in San Francisco. It is also a  nonprofit that believes stories matter and its aim is to get would-be writers writing. It’s first year, 1999, had 21 participants. This year, it is expected that 4000,000 participants from across 6 continents will take part. Last year 667 Brisbane would be wordsmiths were involved in NaNoWriMo reaching an average word count of 26, 575 each.

Your challenge, if you choose to accept, is to pen 50,000 words of your great literary work in the 30 days of November. If that seems just a tad too ambitious, why not just get started and see where it ends up?

Over 250 NaNoWriMo novels have been traditionally published. They include Sara Gruen’s Water for Elephants, Erin Morgenstern’s The Night Circus,  Jason Hough’s The Darwin Elevator, and Marissa Meyer’s Cinder

Sign up here and get started on your soon to be best-selling (or at least critically acclaimed) prose.

And if you’re looking for a quiet place to write then the new individual cubes on Level 6 Silent Zone of the QUT Library at Gardens Point are now open and can be booked here.

 

Light! End of the tunnel!

You're nearly there minifig! 'Small Climb' by  Black Zack (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

You’re nearly there minifig! ‘Small Climb’ by Black Zack
(CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

The weather’s warming up, and all that sunshine is like a beacon of hope – it’s almost the end of semester! You’ve already handed in a few assignments and things are rolling along. To make sure you keep the momentum going, here are a few tips:

  • Use the Assignment Calculator to help manage your time on these last assessments.
  • Set some time aside for each of your assessment pieces. A weekly planner is available here.
  • If you aren’t sure about your assignment task, talk to your tutor or lecturer about what is required.
  • Ask someone at the Library Helpdesk to show you our online learning resources and help you find information.
  • Book a Study Solutions appointment for a 25 minute one-on-one appointment to talk about your assignment.
  • Check out your faculty’s peer assistance program to talk to another student about your study.

Time can slip away quickly. For best results with less stress, start early, work consistently and finish strong!

Get help with your assignments without leaving your couch!

Lib_chat

For the times when you aren’t able to visit our Library Helpdesk on campus, we offer an online chat service, Chat to a Librarian.

You can use Chat to a Librarian during semester at these times:

  • Monday – Friday: 10am – 9.45pm
  • Weekends and Public Holidays: 12pm – 4.45pm

To get started, just hit the chat button on the QUT Library home page and fill in some basic information. One of our friendly librarians will be ready and waiting to answer your question.

You can use the chat service to get help with finding information for your assignment, assistance using databases, and advice on referencing.

If you need help outside the times the chat service is open (but you still want to stay at home in your pajamas), we have loads of information to help you anytime that you need it:

  • To find the answers to some common library questions, try the AskQUT Library FAQ.
  • For help with referencing, try QUT cite|write
  • There are some great tips on assignment research and writing available on Studywell.

We look forward to chatting with you soon.

So, learning to knit ISN’T going to help with my essay?

Procrastination-001 by  Ludie Cochrane (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Procrastination-001 by Ludie Cochrane (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Sorry procrastinators and those who thrive on the adrenaline rush of last-minute essay completion – the results are in and it’s not good news. A study out of the University of Warwick Business School has shown that students who hand in assignments at the last minute face a five per cent drop in marks when compared with those who submitted 24 hours or more before it was due.

The paper, Time of submission: An indicator of procrastination and a correlate of performance on undergraduate marketing assignments, which was presented at the European Marketing Academy conference investigated 504 first-year students’ and 273 third-year students’ end of term assignments

Work handed in ahead of schedule was far more likely to be awarded a distinction than work not handed in until much closer to the deadline. The average mark dropped by the hour until those handing in the paper at the last minute produced the worst results. Those that literally handed work in at the last minute could see as much as a five per cent drop on score, from 64.17 to 59.00 — taking them a whole grade lower.

Image provided by David Arnott and Scott Dacko, of Warwick Business School http://www.wbs.ac.uk/news/leaving-essays-to-the-last-minute-ruins-students-grades/

So what can you do about your procrastination habit?  How do you stop yourself from meandering into the depths of pointless activities, random hobbies (not that there isn’t value in knowing how to knit) and delaying the inevitable task ahead?

It’s all about time management.

  • The nifty QUT Library Assignment Calculator can keep you on track to complete an assignment with plenty of time to spare – including reminding you to take breaks and have some fun along the way!
  • For a more long-range view of how to manage your time across the semester, the QUT Library Semester & Weekly Planning guide can help you see at a glance what’s looming and help you juggle all your competing priorities.
  • For specific essay help, the Library Writing an Essay guide as well as our most popular resource, the Writing Structure Overview, specifically address the requirements of essay writing.

Also, check out our related QUT Library Blog post Writing great Assignments for more tips and save the knitting until semester break.

Why you’ve already forgotten how this sentence began

"Memory write/read failure" by  Marek Isalski (CC BY-SA 2.0)

“Memory write/read failure” by Marek Isalski
(CC BY-SA 2.0)

It is easy to under-appreciate how much you read on a screen each day – hey, look you’re doing it right now – and this ease and availability of content is one great benefit of the Internet. But, it seems  most technological advancements have a flip side and what researchers from Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand, have found definitely affects you as students or researchers!

As the average student is faced with weekly readings reaching double digits each week, it stands to reason that you’re attempting to read many of these on screen wherever possible. However, in their paper ‘Is Google making us stupid? The Impact of the Internet on Reading Behaviour’  authors Val Hooper and Channa Herath reveal that unfortunately, online reading appears to have negative effects on our cognition. Concentration, comprehension, recall and absorption rates all scored lower when reading online compared to paper-based reading. It appears that this offline/paper-based reading allows for ‘deep reading’ and the ability to annotate papers further assisted in information absorption and retention in both the short and long term.

All these benefits, of course, have to weighed up against the dollar cost of printing out every item you have to read and the environmental impact of doing so as well. But being aware from the outset that reading online may be putting you behind-the-eightball then you can employ some strategies to help get the most out of your readings on the screen and to counter this possible screen-nesia.  QUT Library’s Studywell has some strategies and resources for effective reading and notetaking.

There is an element of irony in this post being published in an online medium so do your best and try to remember what you’ve learned here today – may I suggest taking some notes by hand to assist in you in your retention?