Open Access Week at QUT

Guest blog by Professor Ginny Barbour, Director of the Australasian Open Access Strategy Group (AOASG) & Professor in the Division of Research and Innovation, QUT

As we head towards the end of October – we again turn our focus to a week dedicated to open access (OA). Now in its 11th year, International Open Access Week, 21-27 October, is a global, community-driven week of action aimed at opening up access to research. It has grown into a truly national and global celebration.

This year’s theme is “Open for whom? Equity in Open Knowledge.” As open access becomes increasingly the norm, the 2019 Open Access Week Advisory Committee poses the question, “Whose interests are being prioritized in the actions we take and in the platforms that we support? Whose voices are excluded? Are underrepresented groups included as full partners from the beginning? Are we supporting not only open access but also equitable participation in research communication?” Building upon last year’s theme, “Designing Equitable Foundations for Open Knowledge,” these questions will help us determine how emerging open systems for research will address inequities in the current system and ensure that we don’t unintentionally replicate and reinforce them.

There has been much discussion over the past year of open access news from Europe and elsewhere, and especially of Plan S. Open Access Week is a time to remind ourselves, however, that open access is not an end in itself; it is a means to an end – that of an equitable, efficient, and FAIR means of sharing scholarly information. For academics who publish openly the benefits are concrete. A better readership for open articles is not surprising, but the benefit of increased academic usage are also becoming clearer through more citations. Other benefits are of increased citations associated with posting of preprints and of data sharing. Critically, depositing in an OA repository such as QUT’s ePrints, is demonstrated to be the best way to boost citations. Furthermore, open articles are better connected into global systems for sharing information, which means that ultimately they can have wider societal impact. Depositing records and full text is the most important way that QUT researchers can comply with QUT’s open access policy and that of the two big Australian funders, ARC and NHMRC — all for free. But more than that, QUT’s repository allows anyone anywhere to access its research outputs.

QUT Library and others will be celebrating Open Access Week with a number of events. Once again we will bringing our popular Open Access Bike Tour to Gardens Point and Kelvin Grove campuses on Monday 21 and Tuesday 22 October. There will be OA giveaways, lucky dips, badges and more. Watch this short video of last year’s bike tour, and see below to find out when the Open Access Bike will be coming to a campus near you.

 

All are welcome to attend a webinar with an international focus on Monday 21 October, entitled Advancing Science in Indonesia: Current Global Research Practices. In addition to myself, the webinar features Professor Brian Nosek, the Executive Director of the Center for Open Science, Professor Simine Vazire from University of California, Davis and focuses on improving research practices in science.

On Wednesday 23 October we will be launching Hacky Hour at QUT: Skills for Open Research. Come along to The Pantry at 2:00pm and chat with an expert about skills for open research. Follow us on Twitter @GPHackyHour for details.

Join QUT IP & Innovation Research on Thursday 24 October for a thought-provoking symposium on Open Innovation. This free event, featuring speakers from a range of disciplines, will examine Open Education, Law, Culture, Open Cities, Additive Manufacturing, Agriculture, Robotics and more. Register here.

If you will be attending eResearch Australasia, be sure to come along to our session on Doing open access advocacy by stealth. Stephanie Bradbury, Manager Research Support Team, QUT Library, and I will be running this interactive workshop on Thursday 24 October from 11:40am-12:40pm.

Come along and get involved. For more details, follow @QUTLibrary on Twitter or email library.research@qut.edu.au.

Children’s Book Week

CONGRATULATIONS to the Children’s Book Council of Australia (CBCA) 2019 Book of the Year Award winners and honour books! Gritty, contemporary themes are tackled by many books, challenging their readers to contemplate a range of important social issues.

You can access the CBCA website for the Winners,  CBCA Short list and Notables list.

The Library has a lovely display of the CBCA books. All titles are available for loan and can be found in the Curriculum area on level 4 of R Block, Kelvin Grove Library.

 

We also have a Children’s Literature Library Subject Guide where you can read the shortlisted and winning books and follow the links to QUT Library’s online and print copies.

Enjoy Children’s Book Week and happy reading !

Artistry & Chemistry: The Robert Augustus Henry L’Estrange collection

While most of QUT’s library collection consists of the expected textbooks, online databases and other learning materials, we also have our special collections – unique collections of historically and culturally significant materials. Currently on display in the Kelvin Grove Library are items from the Robert Augustus Henry L’Estrange collection, generously donated by his family.

Image: L’Estrange Family, circa 1910

Robert L’Estrange (b.1858- d.1941) had a varied and wide-ranging life but he eventually settled with his family in Victoria Street, Red Hill – less than 500m from the KG campus. He was a keen and prolific amateur photographer and his photographic materials from the turn of the century form the basis of the collection.

Image: Unknown lady with rifle and a saltwater crocodile

Hundreds of his photos, taken between 1880 and 1919, have been digitised from the glass plate negatives by QUT Library. They depict life in Brisbane, North Queensland, and other parts of the world at the turn of the century, just when photography was becoming accessible to the at-home enthusiast. His subjects include early Brisbane cityscapes, local shopkeepers at their work, portraits of his family, and even a young girl’s backyard birthday party.

Image: Children’s party in the grounds of the Herston residence, Coralyn, ca. 1907

Image: Petrie Bight showing National Hotel and Customs House, Brisbane, 1900

Artefacts on display include glass-plate negatives, L’Estrange’s wooden Harrington & Co camera, lab equipment for preparing photographic chemicals, and lantern slides that would have been used with a gas-lit early form of projector.

Come in to Kelvin Grove library and check out the displays on Level 2 (underneath the central staircase) and Level 4 (between the fire stairs and the printers).

 

Exams – Are you prepared?

Exams will soon be upon us, and if you’re wondering how best to prepare (other than starting early), consider the following tips.

  • Research has shown that being in the right room at the right time on the right date significantly increases your chances of passing an exam. Remember to double-check these details. Also check which materials you are permitted to bring in.
  • Check your Blackboard site to see if your lecturer or tutor has provided any information regarding the content, duration, and/or format of your exam.
  • Make the most of any opportunity to practise. Again, consult Blackboard: your lecturer or tutor may have posted practice materials. Also check QUT Readings to see if there are any past exams available for your units.

  • Refer to QUT’s Exam Preparation page for advice on note-taking, managing your time, understanding different exam types (multiple choice, short answer, essay question, etc.), and more.
  • Take advantage of the Library’s extended opening hours. Gardens Point Library is open from 7am to 2am seven days a week until 21st June, and Kelvin Grove Library will be open 7am to 2am seven days a week from 3rd to 21st June.
  • See this helpful advice for managing exam-related stress. And remember that QUT Counselling Services are available to assist you further.

Best of luck from all of us at QUT Library! If you require any help, please don’t hesitate to ask.

 

World Poetry Day 2019

“Poetry lifts the veil from the hidden beauty of the world, and makes familiar objects be as if they were not familiar.” So said eighteenth-century English Romantic poet Percy Bysshe Shelley. If Shelley were alive today, he would no doubt be gearing up for World Poetry Day, an annual global celebration of poetry in all its forms.

Declared by UNESCO in 1999, WPD aims to promote the reading, writing, and teaching of poetry; to support linguistic diversity through poetry; and above all to remind us that poetry is a living and vibrant mode of expression—as is evident from contemporary spoken-word forms such as rap and hip-hop, not to mention the popularity of poetry slams.

If you are looking to explore the world of poetry, QUT Library is an excellent resource. Our extensive selection of print and e-books has something for all tastes, from the ancient Homeric epic The Iliad to the works of contemporary poets including Queenslanders David Malouf, Ellen Van Neerven, and QUT Creative Writing lecturer Sarah Holland-Batt.

And check out the Library’s video streaming service, Kanopy, to see poets and poetry come to life on the screen: there are documentaries, filmed performances, and more!

 

 

Get back into study

You’ve just been through O-Week and you’re getting ready to start a new year of lectures, tutorials and research and it all feels a little bit exciting and overwhelming all at the same time. Don’t stress about it though. Get prepared by using some of QUT Library’s resources on academic listening and note-taking; check out the information on the Study page of your Digital Workplace; and use Study Smart, a self-paced research and study skills tutorial, all to help you get the academic year started right.

Study Smart. Research and study skills tutorial

Once you’ve checked your unit outlines, use the Assignment Calculator to work out when you need to start those assignments to keep those stress levels to a minimum. And don’t forget that we’re here to help you in the Library with all of your researching and referencing needs. See (or contact) the staff in HiQ at Gardens Point or Kelvin Grove to make an appointment with a library specialist (face-to-face, telephone, video chat), or use our online chat or email if digital is more your thing. More details can be found on our Need help? page.

Time to get out of here?

The Library has plenty of travel guides to plan your well deserved break 

Whether you are heading off on a road trip, flying interstate or internationally we have got you covered.  There are loads of guides at the Kelvin Grove Library as well as online that you can access from anywhere.

Here are some quick links for some travel guides: 

Or just type in the destination of your choice and add the words ‘travel guide’ here on our Library homepage

If you are on campus you can also browse the collection at the Kelvin Grove Library on the 3rd floor in the 915 call number area.

Whatever you do we wish you well for a safe holiday break!

 

QUT Open Day 2018

QUT Open Day is this Sunday the 29th July, and it’s the perfect opportunity to explore everything happening at QUT, whether you’re a prospective student or currently studying here.

  • talk to staff and students from all faculties and study areas
    (including courses based at Kelvin Grove campus)
  • go to information sessions
  • explore the facilities at Gardens Point campus

While you’re visiting QUT, why not catch a free shuttle bus to Kelvin Grove?
There will be tours of the campus and facilities, including the Library and HiQ.
Buses will run every 15 minutes from 8am to 3.45pm

A visit to QUT Library is highly recommended!
  • Join a tour of the Law Library and courtrooms. The QUT Law Library provides specialised legal information, resources and access to highly qualified law librarians. You’ll find the Law Library on Level 5 of C Block, Gardens Point campus
  • Explore Gardens Point Library (V Block, Gardens Point campus) and Kelvin Grove Library (R Block, Kelvin Grove campus) where you can take a 15 minute guided tour of the Library and HiQ.

For more details, check out the QUT Open Day Program and create your own customised day plan for all of the seminars and tours you’d like to attend.

Don’t keep history a mystery

This month we celebrate National Reconciliation Week. 

The theme for 2018 is Don’t keep history a mystery, and aims to highlight some of the lesser known aspects of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, histories, cultures, and achievements.  It’s calling on all Australians to ask the question:  What are some of the things I don’t know about our shared history?

On Thursday 31 May there’ll be a free screening of the movie, We Don’t Need a Map on level 2 of the Library/HiQ, R Block, KG.  Everyone’s welcome, and popcorn will be provided!

We Don’t Need a Map is a thought provoking look at Australia’s relationship with the Southern Cross, from its significance to indigenous Australians to its adoption as a national symbol.

There are a number of other activities happening around campus including the Inter-uni Reconciliation Cup against Griffith Uni,  and the first Vice-Chancellor’s Forum for the year with guest speaker, Stan Grant.

Check out more QUT Reconciliation Week activities here and find other community and national Reconciliation Week events here.

Virtual Reality comes to the Games Lab at QUT Library!

Virtual Reality comes to the Games Lab at QUT Library! And it’s yours to explore. Borrow the PlayStation VR Headset from HiQ at Kelvin Grove and experience immersive virtual reality.

pexels-photo-123335 by Bradley Hook available at https://www.pexels.com/photo/sky-woman-clouds-girl-123335/ (CC0 license)

Ocean Descent, Danger Ball, The Luge, Resident Evil Biohazard and Batman Arkham are just some of the games and experiences available.

More VR games coming soon! Got a game to suggest? Let us know at askqut@qut.edu.au or tweet to @qutlibrary