Journal Impact Factors

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The 2014 Journal Impact Factors (JIFs) have arrived from Thomson Reuters. You can find them right now in Journal Citation Reports (JCR). A JIF for a journal for a given year measures the overall number of citations of articles published in that journal in the two previous years, and divides them by the number of citable items of that journal for those two years.

Example: JIF= (2011 citations to 2010+2009 articles)/(no. of “citable” articles published in 2009+2010)

Highlights in JCR this year:

  • 272 new journals have received their first Impact Factor.
  • 53% of journals will receive an increase in their Impact Factor.
  • 39 titles have been suppressed, either for high rates of self-citation or ‘citation stacking’. (Suppression from the JCR lasts one year and requires reevaluation before a journal is relisted.)
  • 11,149 journals are ranked. Australian journals make up a small percentage of that number.

What’s new?

While editors and researchers are very much interested in the Journal Impact Factors (JIFs), there is a new complementary calculation so that journals can be compared within and between subject disciplines.

The JIF Percentile translates a journal’s category rank into a percentile. For example, a journal that is ranked 19 out of 291 Biochemistry & Molecular Biology journals would receive a JIF Percentile score of 0.94. * JIF Percentile is calculated as (n – r + .5)/n where n = number of journals in the category and r = descending rank of the journal within that category.

More information?