International Human Rights Day

On Monday 10 December we celebrate International Human Rights Day.  While it will be celebrated in different ways by different people, the message around the world is the same.

This year the Universal Declaration of Human Rights turns 70.  The document, which proclaimed the inalienable right to which all human beings are entitled — regardless of race, colour, religion, sex, language, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status, is the most translated in the world.

A really lovely representation of these principals, and a great way to share them with a younger audience is the illustrated edition of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.  It’s published by the United Nations in Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian, and Spanish.

QUT is heavily involved in research into the area of human rights. Here’s some of our most recently published works about the current challenges and issues in the area — available in QUT’s ePrints repository.

O’Brien, Erin (2019) Challenging the Human Trafficking Narrative: Victims, Villains, and Heroes. 

Kauli, Jackie & Thomas, Verena (2018) Communicating the law: A participatory communication toolkit for human rights defenders in Papua New Guinea. 

Huggins, Anna & Lewis, Bridget (2018) The Paris Agreement: Development, the North-South divide and human rights. 

 

 

 

 

Human Rights Day

1 November 1949 - United Nations, Lake Success, New York: Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt (USA) holding the Universal Declaration of Human Rights as a poster in English.

1 November 1949 – United Nations, Lake Success, New York: Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt (USA) holding the Universal Declaration of Human Rights as a poster in English.

Human Rights Day celebrates the day the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights on 10 December 1948. The United Nations Prize in the Field of Human Rights and the Nobel Peace Prize are also generally awarded on 10 December.

This video created by the United Nations Development Programme in Rwanda succinctly illustrates the 30 articles of the Universal Deceleration of Human Rights. Check it out if you want to get a handle on human rights but don’t fancy reading the whole document.

[youtube RiPgIUO6jWs]

Connect with the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights on Twitter and Facebook to keep up to date with news and events in the lead up to Human Rights Day.