Open science, open data – the World Science Festival Brisbane

“It’s not enough to do it; it must be communicated” – Virginia Barbour, Executive Director, Australasian Open Access Strategy Group, on a key concept in science.

Providing open access to research, including publications, data, software, methodologies and all other research outputs, is a growing worldwide initiative, as is the drive to solve real-world problems and stimulate innovation.  The lack of access to research publications and their accompanying data is inhibiting national and international collaboration, public debate and research, however, times are changing.

Originally applied only to data, the F.A.I.R. principles now apply to all research outputs, as proposed at a November 2016 meeting of the G20 Science, Technology and Innovation Ministers Meeting.  Research findings that are F.A.I.R. are Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable.

“With F.A.I.R. access, Australian research will be more visible, the broader community will have better access to well-founded knowledge, Australian researchers will be able to more easily collaborate locally and globally, including with industry, and the Australian research enterprise will be more accountable to the community it serves” – F.A.I.R. Access Working Group

Dr Salvatore Mele from the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) reports that research in the field of physics has always been openly available, with researchers posting each other hard copies of publications that were submitted for review.  During the World Science Festival, which is being held in Brisbane from 22-26 March, the world-renowned Large Hadron Collider will be on display at the Queensland Museum.

Managed by CERN, the data collected from use of the Collider are published in the CERN Open Data Portal, and are accompanied by the software and documentation required to make sense of the data being shared.  Here at QUT, researchers can publish their data and accompanying material through our data repository, Research Data Finder.  We’re doing our bit to accelerate open science by providing access to open data!

Take a look at datasets that have already been added, including ‘Fusion transcripts in prostate cancer using RNA sequences derived from Australian and Chinese men’ by Dr Jyotsna Batra and Dr John Lai, and perhaps add one of your own at QUT Research Data Finder.