Anti-Poverty Week

Anti-Poverty Week 13 – 19 of October 

Anti-Poverty Week supports the Australian community to have an increased understanding of poverty and to take action collectively to end it.

For more information about poverty in Australia visit the Anti-Poverty website.

QUT library also has a large number of resources about poverty and you can check them out here.

Seek help @ QUT

If you find yourself in need of financial assistance while you’re studying with QUT, we offer a number of support services to help get you through, just click here.

The QUT Guild Foodbank can also provide basic food items to get you through, they stock non-perishable items, fresh fruit and veg and hygiene products.

 

Open Access Week at QUT

Guest blog by Professor Ginny Barbour, Director of the Australasian Open Access Strategy Group (AOASG) & Professor in the Division of Research and Innovation, QUT

As we head towards the end of October – we again turn our focus to a week dedicated to open access (OA). Now in its 11th year, International Open Access Week, 21-27 October, is a global, community-driven week of action aimed at opening up access to research. It has grown into a truly national and global celebration.

This year’s theme is “Open for whom? Equity in Open Knowledge.” As open access becomes increasingly the norm, the 2019 Open Access Week Advisory Committee poses the question, “Whose interests are being prioritized in the actions we take and in the platforms that we support? Whose voices are excluded? Are underrepresented groups included as full partners from the beginning? Are we supporting not only open access but also equitable participation in research communication?” Building upon last year’s theme, “Designing Equitable Foundations for Open Knowledge,” these questions will help us determine how emerging open systems for research will address inequities in the current system and ensure that we don’t unintentionally replicate and reinforce them.

There has been much discussion over the past year of open access news from Europe and elsewhere, and especially of Plan S. Open Access Week is a time to remind ourselves, however, that open access is not an end in itself; it is a means to an end – that of an equitable, efficient, and FAIR means of sharing scholarly information. For academics who publish openly the benefits are concrete. A better readership for open articles is not surprising, but the benefit of increased academic usage are also becoming clearer through more citations. Other benefits are of increased citations associated with posting of preprints and of data sharing. Critically, depositing in an OA repository such as QUT’s ePrints, is demonstrated to be the best way to boost citations. Furthermore, open articles are better connected into global systems for sharing information, which means that ultimately they can have wider societal impact. Depositing records and full text is the most important way that QUT researchers can comply with QUT’s open access policy and that of the two big Australian funders, ARC and NHMRC — all for free. But more than that, QUT’s repository allows anyone anywhere to access its research outputs.

QUT Library and others will be celebrating Open Access Week with a number of events. Once again we will bringing our popular Open Access Bike Tour to Gardens Point and Kelvin Grove campuses on Monday 21 and Tuesday 22 October. There will be OA giveaways, lucky dips, badges and more. Watch this short video of last year’s bike tour, and see below to find out when the Open Access Bike will be coming to a campus near you.

 

All are welcome to attend a webinar with an international focus on Monday 21 October, entitled Advancing Science in Indonesia: Current Global Research Practices. In addition to myself, the webinar features Professor Brian Nosek, the Executive Director of the Center for Open Science, Professor Simine Vazire from University of California, Davis and focuses on improving research practices in science.

On Wednesday 23 October we will be launching Hacky Hour at QUT: Skills for Open Research. Come along to The Pantry at 2:00pm and chat with an expert about skills for open research. Follow us on Twitter @GPHackyHour for details.

Join QUT IP & Innovation Research on Thursday 24 October for a thought-provoking symposium on Open Innovation. This free event, featuring speakers from a range of disciplines, will examine Open Education, Law, Culture, Open Cities, Additive Manufacturing, Agriculture, Robotics and more. Register here.

If you will be attending eResearch Australasia, be sure to come along to our session on Doing open access advocacy by stealth. Stephanie Bradbury, Manager Research Support Team, QUT Library, and I will be running this interactive workshop on Thursday 24 October from 11:40am-12:40pm.

Come along and get involved. For more details, follow @QUTLibrary on Twitter or email library.research@qut.edu.au.

Brisbane Writers Festival

Celebrate the written word at this year’s Brisbane Writers Festival, 5-8 September.

Hosted by the State Library of Queensland, the Queensland Art Gallery & Gallery of Modern Art (QAGOMA), and various public libraries around Brisbane, the BWF features an impressive program of panel discussions, workshops, performances, and meet-the-writer sessions.

It’s a great opportunity for readers of all persuasions–not to mention students in Creative Writing and related disciplines–to hear local and international writers read and discuss their work. The diverse program comprises novelists, poets, children’s authors, journalists, historians, philosophers, and at least one former Prime Minister.

This year’s line-up includes Brisbane-born Melissa Lucashenko, whose novel Too Much Lip won the 2019 Miles Franklin Award; British author Jasper Fforde, perhaps best known for his highly original novel The Eyre Affair; multiple Walkley Award-winning journalist Kerry O’Brien; and over 150 other writers.

For devotees of Young Adult literature and getting into things for free, the BWF is hosting Love YA, a full day of (free) events at Brisbane Square Library, Saturday 7th September. Meet notable Australian YA authors such as James Moloney, Randa Abdel-Fattah, and Will Kostakis. If you’re not familiar with their books, there’s a good selection in QUT Library’s Curriculum Collection.

The work of many other featured BWF writers can be found in the Library’s General Collection.

National Science Week and Robotronica

From 10th to 18th August, science and technology take to the streets for National Science Week.

Established in 1997, this annual celebration of science and technology acknowledges the contributions of Australian scientists to the world, and encourages members of the general public to engage with science in all its forms.

There will be hundreds of nationwide events, including many free activities, talks, workshops, and live shows.

UQ Demotroupe

Free events include:

  • VR immersive experiences. Explore beneath the sea or beyond the stars simply by putting on a slightly odd pair of goggles.
  • Public lectures. Listen to astrophysicists, meteorologists, and other science luminaries explain the mysteries of the universe from a scientific standpoint.
  • Scinema International Science Film Festival. Watch science films from around the world, screening in various locations around Queensland.
  • Children’s activities. Introduce your kids to the joys of chemistry, Lego boats, and aeroelastic flutter bees.

CoralWatch Community at Brisbane Science FestivalAnd no celebration of science and technology would be complete without quite a few robots. Speaking of which, the Robotronica robotics and technology festival, coming hot on the heels of National Science Week, will take place on 18th August at QUT Gardens Point campus. QUT Library will be part of the action: if you’re keen to experience Virtual and Augmented Reality, the Library is the place to be. Drop in: it’s free!

 

 

 

 

 

 

World Poetry Day 2019

“Poetry lifts the veil from the hidden beauty of the world, and makes familiar objects be as if they were not familiar.” So said eighteenth-century English Romantic poet Percy Bysshe Shelley. If Shelley were alive today, he would no doubt be gearing up for World Poetry Day, an annual global celebration of poetry in all its forms.

Declared by UNESCO in 1999, WPD aims to promote the reading, writing, and teaching of poetry; to support linguistic diversity through poetry; and above all to remind us that poetry is a living and vibrant mode of expression—as is evident from contemporary spoken-word forms such as rap and hip-hop, not to mention the popularity of poetry slams.

If you are looking to explore the world of poetry, QUT Library is an excellent resource. Our extensive selection of print and e-books has something for all tastes, from the ancient Homeric epic The Iliad to the works of contemporary poets including Queenslanders David Malouf, Ellen Van Neerven, and QUT Creative Writing lecturer Sarah Holland-Batt.

And check out the Library’s video streaming service, Kanopy, to see poets and poetry come to life on the screen: there are documentaries, filmed performances, and more!

 

 

A Portrait of the Artist: Nick Earls on William Robinson

Prolific Brisbane novelist and short-story writer Nick Earls has turned to non-fiction to celebrate one of Australia’s most significant living artists in William Robinson: A new perspective.

Commissioned by QUT’s William Robinson Gallery at Gardens Point Campus, Earls’ enlightening and often humorous chronicle of Robinson’s life and work comes in an attractive hardcover edition, available at the Gallery and at the QUT Bookshop.

William Robinson: A new perspective was launched in tandem with the Gallery’s currently showing Nature Imagined exhibition, featuring Robinson’s visionary renderings of the landscapes of South East Queensland.

For a more interactive experience,The Cube (Gardens Point Campus) is displaying selected Robinson landscapes digitised at high resolution, allowing you to zoom in on the details and gain insights into his techniques.

Want to learn more about William Robinson and his work? Keen to sample some of Nick Earls’ fiction? The QUT Library is an invaluable resource.

 

October is for Mental Health

There is a lot going on in October!

  • Queensland Mental Health Week 6-14 October  
  • World Mental Health Day 10th of October
  • Mental Health Month

Did you know?

1 in 5 Australians are affected by mental illness, yet many don’t seek help because of stigma.

We can all do something to help shed a more positive light on mental health.

Here are some links to the various events that have loads of helpful practical information for you or someone you know.

Queensland Mental Health Week

World Mental Health Day

Mental Health Month

 

 

Australian Reading Hour

Australian Reading Hour

What is Australian Reading Hour? Australian Reading Hour is an initiative supported by the Australian Government, Better Reading and the Copyright Agency Cultural Fund to encourage all Australians across the country to pick up a book and read for one hour on your own or with your children. It is being driven by libraries all across Australia to promote the benefits of reading.

What are the benefits of reading? Well, it helps to increase literacy and numeracy skills and has a positive and significant effect on your work. Reading reduces stress by 68%, relieving stress more quickly than listening to music, going for a walk or having a cup of tea, and we all know that tea fixes everything 😉. The more leisure books people read, the more literate they become and the more prosperous and equitable the society they live in becomes. Reading a gripping novel causes positive biological changes in the brain that can last for days. Who knew that indulging in your fave author or book genre could have a positive effect on society and yourself? When tested for empathy, readers of narrative fiction achieved significantly higher than other groups. With a bit more empathy, our world would be a more harmonious place to live.

Children who know adults who read for pleasure take it for granted that reading is valuable and reading is closely linked to increasing our understanding of our own identities. It was found by the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research that reading to children six to seven days a week puts them almost a year ahead of those who are not being read to. So reading to children and encouraging them to read is setting them up for success in life. Isn’t that what every parent wants?

Sounds good. When is it? It’s on Thursday September 20 2018, and the hour and reading material are your choice. Find more information and to register your interest on their website, go to  https://www.readinghour.org.au/.

I don’t have a book to read for leisure at the moment. Do QUT Libraries have anything? Yes! QUT Libraries have more than just your textbooks. There are great fiction novels in print and online, for adults and children. Check Quick Find today.

But I prefer non-fiction. That’s okay. QUT Libraries have that covered too. We have autobiographies, biographies, commentaries, self-help books plus a whole lot more. The choice is yours! 😊

Don’t forget, when searching in Quick Find, you can limit your results to books and ebooks only.

Don’t keep history a mystery

This month we celebrate National Reconciliation Week. 

The theme for 2018 is Don’t keep history a mystery, and aims to highlight some of the lesser known aspects of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, histories, cultures, and achievements.  It’s calling on all Australians to ask the question:  What are some of the things I don’t know about our shared history?

On Thursday 31 May there’ll be a free screening of the movie, We Don’t Need a Map on level 2 of the Library/HiQ, R Block, KG.  Everyone’s welcome, and popcorn will be provided!

We Don’t Need a Map is a thought provoking look at Australia’s relationship with the Southern Cross, from its significance to indigenous Australians to its adoption as a national symbol.

There are a number of other activities happening around campus including the Inter-uni Reconciliation Cup against Griffith Uni,  and the first Vice-Chancellor’s Forum for the year with guest speaker, Stan Grant.

Check out more QUT Reconciliation Week activities here and find other community and national Reconciliation Week events here.